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National
Why is the Honda Accord the most stolen car in America?
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Why is the Honda Accord the most stolen car in America?

Why is the Honda Accord the most stolen car in America?

Why is the Honda Accord the most stolen car in America?

Cars can be quite an expensive target for thieves. But if you're shopping for a new one and you're interested in the Honda Accord, consider this: It's reportedly been ranked the most stolen vehicle for the last several years. (Via Wikimedia Commons / Bull-Doser)

A report released Monday by vehicle-tracking company LoJack lists the Honda Accord as the most stolen vehicle in 2013, followed by the Honda Civic. The Accord tops the list for the fifth year in a row. (Via USA Today / Cars.com

Another similar report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau also lists the Accord as the top target for theft - making up a total of nearly 60,000 thefts in 2012 alone.

So, what makes the Accord such a prime target in the eyes of thieves? The answer might be an economic issue - that of supply and demand. 

A LoJack executive tells ABC: "The Honda Accord continues to be a top seller ... for a variety of reasons including their reliability. ... That means year after year there are more Accords on the road, getting into car accidents or needing parts for repair."

Anyone selling an Accord can often get three times its value just for its parts alone, as they can be interchangeable across model years. (Via Honda)

According to the NICB's list of top stolen cars, the most stolen were Accord models from the '90s. So modern, more technologically advanced Accords probably aren't as easy to break into.

And as USA Today points out, most of the cars on that list are frequent best-sellers aside from a few, such as the Acura Integra, which hasn't been available in the U.S. since 2001.

LoJack is one of the largest vehicle-tracking companies in the world, and its security systems are commonly found in many modern cars today. It's important to note LoJack's list only accounts for vehicles equipped with one of its systems.

A spokesperson for Honda released a statement saying the company "cannot completely account for criminal behavior," but it does equip new vehicles with security devices to counteract theft.

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