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Tiny dog thrown from car has huge fight ahead

Abby is barely 4 pounds, and her casts are so big she has to take extra slow steps to move. 

A driver rescued Abby after watching someone throw her from a moving car. 

Jacksonville Humane Society Shelter Medical Director Dr. Lauren Rockey says the 1-year-old Chihuahua is in pretty good shape despite the serious injuries.

She even walked for the first time, for the Action News camera.

“When Abby first came in she wasn't using her front legs, so we did X-rays and she has fractures where our wrists would be in humans. She has two fractures as well on both of her front legs,” said Rockey.

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Abby is on medicine to manage the pain, but she still wags her tail with hope. Vets say the puppy has a long road to recovery ahead of her. She faces surgery to install a plate with screws down each of the bones in her lower body to help her heal.

“This is a quick fix, it's an acute injury. We're obviously finding it pretty quickly and getting her repaired quickly, should be an eight-week recovery time. We really want to make sure that she rested her legs,” says Rockey.

Humane Society Executive Director Denise Deisler has a message for the person who did this to the dog with a fighting spirit.

"If they've got issues with anger, issues with patience, and issues with understanding and control, then they've got no business having dependent beings in their life and I would certainly hope that Abby would be the last dependent being that is harmed at their hands," said Deisler.


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