ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
69°
Cloudy
H 78° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    69°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 78° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    75°
    Afternoon
    Cloudy. H 78° L 67°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    73°
    Evening
    Thunderstorms. H 80° L 55°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

National
Thousands donate to Michaels manager after customer berates her, claims discrimination
Close

Thousands donate to Michaels manager after customer berates her, claims discrimination

Thousands donate to Michaels manager after customer berates her, claims discrimination
A viral video shows a woman berating employees at a Chicago Michaels art and crafts store (not pictured) and claiming she was discriminated against because she is white. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Thousands donate to Michaels manager after customer berates her, claims discrimination

A Chicago woman was recorded on video yelling at a Michaels arts and crafts store manager because of what she said was discrimination against her because she is white.

WGN reported that the woman was shopping at the store the day before Thanksgiving and was not happy about being asked to purchase a reusable bag to store her items.

Shopper Jessica Grady recorded the incident, which she said lasted about 45 minutes, and uploaded a 10-minute video to YouTube and shared publicly it on Facebook.

In a profanity-laced rant, WGN reported that the unidentified woman said, "I was just discriminated against by two black women!"

>> Read more trending stories

As Grady records, the woman gets upset with her and some other shoppers for recording her. WLS reported that the woman first argued with a store employee and then directed her frustration with the manager.

"You screamed at me from across the store like you were in your own living room, you’re an animal," she said. "You’re an animal."

The woman also said she voted for President-elect Donald Trump. Later in the video, she appears to be calling 911, asking for police to respond because she is being discriminated against.

According to Grady, police were repeatedly called to the store but arrived only after she said the woman "needed medical attention because she was shouting and crying outside the store." Grady said 10 people waited in the store the entire length of the incident for police to arrive.

Michaels issued a statement about the incident:

At Michaels, we do not tolerate discrimination or racism of any kind against our team members or customers. We regret that our customers and team members were affected by this unfortunate incident and are grateful for the leadership of our store team in working to resolve it without further escalation.

WLS spoke with the woman in the video who maintains that she was discriminated against and the situation has been exaggerated. 

Grady created a GoFundMe page to support the unidentified manager and "give her back some holiday cheer and send the message that … this hatred will not be tolerated." More than $22,000 has been raised. Grady's goal was $400.

"I was inspired by her. This incident started over a $1 reusable bag, but it's not new for African Americans and other POC. We have to stand up; if you can't speak up, at least be a witness and share your story."

Grady said in an update on the fundraising page that she has been speaking to the manager about what to do with the additional funds.

"I want this to be her decision to empower her to meet the needs of her family and of her community," she said.

Grady said in a Facebook post Monday that she has received word that the woman's identity has been found and listed on social media, but she asked that people not respond with harassment or violence toward her.

"Do not try to contact her or harass her. Do not post her contact info. Violence is not the answer. Also, she is not the point. Her actions are -- and the fact that this behavior has been normalized is unacceptable," Grady said. "It's happening everywhere. I posted this video so that people would see that this is real. What matters are the employees she hurled the insults at."

"Don't get caught up in demonizing one individual," she said. "This is bigger than that."

Read More
  • A study by Business Insider and Foursquare says the most popular fast-food chain in Oklahoma is Taco Bueno. A press release from Bueno says Business Insider and Foursquare took the total number of visits to each restaurant in various fast-food chains and then divided that by the number of restaurants in the respective chain. The first Taco Bueno was in Texas, but their second restaurant ever was opened right here in Tulsa way back in 1972. There are now 64 locations in Oklahoma. And there are 120 more in Colorado, Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana.
  • A day after Senate approval of a budget outline for 2018 that authorizes expedited work on a tax reform plan- without the threat of a Senate filibuster – House GOP leaders set the table for a vote next week on the budget measure, instead of engaging in House-Senate negotiations that could take several weeks, as Republicans look to generate more momentum for the first major tax reforms since 1986. Friday afternoon, House GOP leaders signaled their plan to simply accept the budget plan passed 51-49 by the Senate, setting a Tuesday meeting of the House Rules Committee, which sets the ground rules for bills on the floor of the House. “We want Americans to wake up in the new year with a new tax code, one that is simple and fair,” said House Speaker Paul Ryan. “Now it is time to meet this moment and deliver real relief to hardworking people.” Approval of the Senate-passed plan would allow tax-writing committees in both the House and Senate to get to work on the actual details of tax reform; what’s been released so far is an outline, but not the fine print. “This is another important milestone for tax reform, and sets the stage for us to pass major tax cuts that will deliver more jobs and higher wages for hardworking Americans all over the country,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. As for Democrats, some feel like they are being set up by the GOP, predicting that Republicans will unveil their tax reform bill, and then demand a vote on it days later. “I am perfectly willing to negotiate,” said Sen. Clare McCaskill (D-MO). “I can’t do it in a vacuum.” “It doesn’t work that way,” McCaskill told reporters. “Why can’t we have a bill?” When you look back at the 1986 Tax Reform Act – that took months to make its way through the House and Senate, and then a conference committee for final negotiations. Need some weekend reading? Here is the link to the explanation of the 1986 Tax Reform Act – it’s only a little under 1,400 pages. It’s a gentle reminder that if you do ‘real’ tax reform – it is a very complicated endeavor.
  • State Attorney General Mike Hunter sent a letter to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions one day after Attorney General Sessions was in Oklahoma. “We need to start treating the industry from the top down like the criminal enterprises they are,” said Hunter. Attorney General Hunter said the letter’s intent is to open communications to develop a federal and state partnership to combat the opioid epidemic. “There is clear evidence of these companies spending millions of dollars on lobbyists and fraudulent marketing campaigns in order to get these drugs into communities across the nation.” Hunter says the feds could go after the manufacturers under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO).
  • Scientists may be a step closer to solving the mystery surrounding death and what happens next. New research finds a person’s brain is still active after the heart stops beating, so many people actually may be aware that they have died, according to a new report. >> Read more trending news Researchers from New York University’s Langone School of Medicine are currently conducting a study to explore how the brain functions after death.  To do so, they examined individuals who suffered cardiac arrest, but were later revived. The scientists noted that death was defined by when the heart stops and blood stops flowing to the brain. During the evaluation, many patients were able to recall full conversations and visuals, and in some cases, participants even reported hearing they had been pronounced dead.  'They'll describe watching doctors and nurses working; they'll describe having awareness of full conversations, of visual things that were going on, that would otherwise not be known to them,' lead author Sam Parnia told Live Science. >> Related: No cure, yet, but scientists may have found the cause of dyslexia Scientists confirmed the patients’ stories with doctors and nurses present at the time of death, and were stunned to hear what the subjects remembered. Why is there still brain activity after death? Brain death is a process. It takes up to 20 seconds before brain waves are no longer detectable. Once they aren’t, a set of cellular processes take place that eventually result in brain death. And this could occur hours after the heart has stopped, Parnia said.  'If you manage to restart the heart, which is what CPR attempts to do, you'll gradually start to get the brain functioning again. The longer you're doing CPR, those brain cell death pathways are still happening — they're just happening at a slightly slower rate,' he said. The scientists are now expanding their ongoing experiment, which will be the largest of its kind, to investigate the occurrences of consciousness after death and how it may affect the rest of a person’s life if they are revived. >> Related: After near-death experience, Atlanta teen pursues songwriting dreams 'In the same way that a group of researchers might be studying the qualitative nature of the human experience of 'love.'” Parnia said.  “For instance, we're trying to understand the exact features that people experience when they go through death, because we understand that this is going to reflect the universal experience we're all going to have when we die.
  • Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. One out of every six premature deaths in the world in 2015 — about 9 million — could be attributed to disease from toxic exposure, according to a major study released Thursday in the Lancet medical journal. The financial cost from pollution-related death, sickness and welfare is equally massive, the report says, costing some $4.6 trillion in annual losses — or about 6.2 percent of the global economy. “There’s been a lot of study of pollution, but it’s never received the resources or level of attention as, say, AIDS or climate change,” said epidemiologist Philip Landrigan, dean of global health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and the lead author on the report. The report marks the first attempt to pull together data on disease and death caused by all forms of pollution combined.