ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day Created with Sketch.
81°
Clear
H 81° L 63°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    81°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 81° L 63°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    64°
    Morning
    Cloudy. H 81° L 63°
  • windy-day Created with Sketch.
    71°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy / Wind. H 78° L 50°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Tenn. temporarily recognizes three same-sex marriages

Trending on Facebook

More Popular and trending stories

A federal judge in Nashville ruled to recognize the marriage of three same-sex couples in Tennessee Friday. This comes after the couples filed a lawsuit asking the state to reconsider its ban on gay marriage.

"Judge Aleta Trauger issued a preliminary injunction against the state, saying it can not enforce Tennessee's ban on same-sex marriages."  (Via WTVF)

"Now Friday's ruling did not say Tennessee's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, however, the judge in this particular case believes the U.S. Constitution does protect the rights of same-sex couples." (Via WSMV)

In the order Trauger wrote, "At this point all signs indicate that, in the eyes of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs' marriages will be placed on an equal footing with those of heterosexual couples and that proscriptions against same-sex marriage will soon become a footnote in the annals of American history." (Via USA Today

The ruling only applies to the three couples, all of whom were married while living in New York or California and later moved to Tennessee. WATE talked to one of the couples involved in the lawsuit who are expecting their first child.  

"All of the protections and rights that any married spouse would have over their child. So it means an incredible amount to me that we can go into the hospital without me having to worry about having those rights in place."

The couple says they hope this is a step in the direction of overturning Tennessee's ban altogether — something that has some of the state's conservative lawmakers on edge.

In a statement Republican Sen. Mike Bell said, "I am saddened that a federal judge has chosen to, at least in a narrow way, overturn the will of over 81 percent of the people of the state of Tennessee who voted to define marriage as between a man and a woman. I am hoping that the higher courts — which I am assuming this will be appealed — will overturn this activist judge’s ruling." (Via The Tennessean | Tennessee General Assembly

The Los Angeles Times points out Tennessee is just one of the many states battling to overturn same-sex marriage bans. Last week four Indiana same-sex couples sued for recognition.  

The ruling is being reviewed by the Tennessee Attorney General's office, which could ultimately overturn it. Seventeen states and Washington, D.C. currently allow same-sex marriage. 

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Tulsa police Thursday released video of an incident in which an officer used his patrol car to end a gunfight. Madison Dickson was the suspect in a string of violent crimes that spanned nearly a week when she was spotted in a vehicle near 91st and Harvard last Saturday. She tried to run, and gunfire is heard on the video, which officers say was directed toward them. The officer swerves left as she points the gun at him, then veers right and runs her over as she attempts to flee. Additional videos released to media by TPD indicate an officer also used a Taser on Dickson after she was down, because she still had the gun and wasn’t responding to commands. “She might not be able to, hang on,” one officer says as others are yelling at her to show her hands. EMSA arrived on the scene a few minutes later, but Dickson died from her injuries.
  • After hours of negotiations that featured personal intervention by President Donald Trump, Republican leaders in the Congress were forced to back off a planned vote on a GOP health care bill, unable to find enough votes approve it and send it on to the Senate for further work. While House leaders said votes were possible on Friday, there was no final agreement to vote on, as more conservative members of the House Freedom Caucus refused to get on board with a deal offered by the White House. “We have not gotten enough of our members to get to yes,” said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), the chair of the Freedom Caucus. “I am still a no at this time,” Meadows told a crush of reporters. “I am desperately trying to get to yes.” Rep. Mark Meadows: “I am still a no at this time. I am desperately trying to get to yes” https://t.co/cQi0OGdJGY — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) March 23, 2017 Other Freedom Caucus members said very little as they exited a Congressional hearing room after a two hour meeting on the health bill, leaving Meadows to get out the message. “No comment,” said Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-FL). “Mark’s got everything,” referring to Meadows. “You know I’m not going express the substance of anything that we talked about in there,” said Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) said as reporters trailed him down the hall. Earlier at the White House, there had been optimism after a meeting between Freedom Caucus members and the President. Lengthy standing ovation from the Freedom Caucus when @POTUS walked into the Cabinet Room just now. Big momentum toward #RepealAndReplace. pic.twitter.com/N1FLGAVFMN — Cliff Sims (@CSims45) March 23, 2017 But, there was no deal.
  • Conservative Republicans opposed to the health care reform bill offered by their leadership have forced a delay in a vote on the measure, which was expected to happen Thursday. House GOP leadership announced they will push the vote back about 2:30 Central Time after a flurry of meetings between Republican members of the Freedom Caucus, moderates pushing the plan, and the White House. The delay is seen as a rebuke of the Trump administration, which has brought pressure to bear in an attempt to bring those more conservative members on board. Those Republicans opposed to the bill in its current form generally want deeper cuts in spending on the program. Some have called it “Obamacare Light,” and say it doesn’t offer enough substantial changes to current law. Those in favor of the bill argue it eliminates the mandate, and puts choice back in the hands of consumers. There’s no official announcement on when House Speaker Paul Ryan might try to reschedule a vote.
  • The CEO of a Connecticut-based marketing firm says job applicants must pass what he has dubbed the “snowflake test” before he will hire them.  In an interview with Stuart Varney on the Fox Business Network, Silent Partner Marketing CEO Kyle Reyes defined a snowflake as “somebody who is going to whine and complain and come to the table with nothing but an entitled attitude and an inability to back their perspective.” Some of the questions on the test include a job candidate’s position and beliefs on America, guns, and police. Reyes said he’s not worried about discrimination lawsuits because he believes the test is really just the same kind of personality assessment that companies do routinely in job interviews. He says roughly 60-percent of applicants have not passed his test. Click here to see the whole “Snowflake Test”.
  • A Tulsa parent is speaking out after she says her daughter had a birth control implant embedded into her arm during a trip from school. >> Read more trending news  Miracle Foster says her parental rights were violated. It all started when her 16-year-old daughter attended a Youth Services of Tulsa lecture about sex education at Langston Hughes Academy. After one of the sessions, the teen and other girls reportedly said they wanted to learn more, and the school arranged for Youth Services of Tulsa to pick them up and take them to a clinic. Rodney L. Clark, the school's principal, says he called Foster to get permission to allow her daughter to go on the trip before they left. Foster says that her daughter then received a three-year Norplant implant at the clinic without her parental consent. Representatives from Youth Services of Tulsa say they do not have to tell a parent about any contraceptives given to minors. Title X federal guidelines allows for teens as young as 12 to receive various forms of contraceptives without a parent's consent. They also said they merely inform and transport teens to the clinics of their choice. They are not involved in the conversations between the teens and the physicians at theses clinics. Foster told FOX23 that she feels that she and her daughter should have had the opportunity to discuss what's best for her.  Clark released a statement Wednesday:  'This was not a field trip. Youth Services of Tulsa does an annual in-service on Sex Education. They offer students an opportunity to contact them on their own for more information. The parent gave her child permission to leave the school. Under Title X once young people are at the clinic and are of reproductive age, they can make decisions on their own without parental consent. As you can understand this situation involves a minor and we do not release information about students. Nevertheless, the student was well within their rights of Title X which is a federal guideline that provides reduced cost family planning services to persons of all reproductive age.