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National News

    Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton was set to reveal his choice Wednesday to replace Al Franken in the U.S. Senate, with the top contender seen as his longtime adviser Lt. Gov. Tina Smith.Dayton has declined to answer questions about the appointment since Franken announced his impending resignation last week following allegations of sexual misconduct. In making the appointment, Dayton was weighing a short-term replacement against pressure from top Democrats in Washington to name someone who would run in 2018 in a special election to complete Franken's term ending in 2020.A Democratic official told The Associated Press last week that Dayton was ready to choose Smith as a placeholder before being pressured to appoint someone who could leverage the appointment into a 2018 run.That official and a second Democratic operative said that Smith was considering a 2018 run amid that pressure. Both Democrats spoke on condition of anonymity to speak freely about private discussions ahead of an announcement.Smith, who earlier this year passed up an expected campaign for governor, did not immediately respond to telephone messages Tuesday. She has not responded to questions about the appointment since Franken announced plans to resign in the coming weeks.Smith, 59, a native of Albuquerque, New Mexico, arrived in Minnesota in 1984 to take a marketing job with General Mills. She grew more political active in the 1990s, founding her own marketing and political consulting firm and eventually managing Walter Mondale's unsuccessful 2002 Senate run as well as his son Ted Mondale's 1998 governor for candidate — also unsuccessful.She also served as a vice president of external affairs for Planned Parenthood Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota, from 2003 to 2006. After that, she served as chief of staff to Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak before taking the same job with Dayton.The special election for Franken's seat is certain to be a closely watched and expensive race for what amounts to a swing seat. Republicans have already floated the possibility that former two-term Gov. Tim Pawlenty will run, giving them a widely known candidate who can raise plenty of money.In a sign of Pawlenty's potential political strength, a top Democratic-allied interest group, Alliance for a Better Minnesota, last month paid for a poll attacking him at a time when he was said to be considering a run for governor.Pawlenty deflected questions about a Senate run Tuesday in an appearance on CNN, where he weighed in on the Alabama Senate race against Republican Roy Moore's candidacy. Moore narrowly lost the race to Democrat Doug Jones.
  • In less than 24 hours, authorities say a would-be suicide bomber's botched attack on a Manhattan transportation hub underneath Times Square became an open-and-shut case after a search of his apartment and hearing the suspect's his own words.Akayed Ullah, who's expected to make his first court appearance on Wednesday, made it clear from a hospital bed where he was being treated for burns from a pipe bomb he strapped to his body that he was on a mission to punish the United States for attacking the Islamic State group, said Acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim. A search of the Bangladeshi immigrant's apartment turned up bomb-making materials, including screws matching those found at the scene intended as carnage-creating shrapnel.'His motivation,' the prosecutor said, 'was not mystery.'Kim said Ullah picked the morning rush on Monday to maximize casualties in his quest 'to kill, to maim and to destroy.'Ullah, 27, with a hate-filled heart and an evil purpose,' carried out the attack after researching how to build a bomb a year ago and planned his mission for several weeks, Kim said.The bomb was assembled in the past week using fragments of a metal pipe, a battery and a Christmas tree light bulb, along with the metal screws, authorities said.The defendant 'had apparently hoped to die in his own misguided rage, taking as many innocent people as he could with him, but through incredible good fortune, his bomb did not seriously injure anyone other than himself,' Kim said.Ullah was charged with providing material support to a terrorist group, use of a weapon of mass destruction and three bomb-related counts. He could get up to life in prison.With a tragedy averted and a growing certainty that he acted alone, attention turned to how best secure New York City's vast public transportation system and the daunting task of identifying those eager to do it harm.The security 'requires every single member of the public's help,' said New York Police Commissioner James O'Neill. 'It requires their vigilance.'There also was political fallout, heightened by news that Ullah had taunted President Donald Trump on Facebook with a post that read, 'Trump you failed to protect your nation.'In reaction to the bombing, the president demanded a tightening of immigration rules that allowed Ullah to enter the country in 2011 on a visa available to certain relatives of U.S. citizens. Less than two months ago, an Uzbek immigrant who came to the U.S. through a visa lottery was accused of killing eight people in New York by mowing them down with a truck along a bike path.'We're going to end both of them — the lottery system and chain migration. We're going to end them fast,' Trump said at the White House.Republican Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley requested background information on Ullah's visa history and whether he'd ever been on a terrorism watch list.Ullah lived with his father, mother and brother in a Brooklyn neighborhood with a large Bangladeshi community, residents said. He was licensed to drive a livery cab from 2012 to 2015, but the license was allowed to lapse, officials said.
  • The decision to allow white nationalist Richard Spencer to speak at the University of Cincinnati is generating strong reactions from the school community.The university announced in October that it would allow Spencer to speak. At the time, UC's board of trustees condemned hate, but cited the fundamental right to free speech at a public university.Messages to first-year president Neville Pinto and other administrators obtained by The Associated Press through a public records request show that crosstown basketball rival Xavier University was among the first to offer support.Xavier spokeswoman Kelly Leon wrote in an email that her school would help in any way that it could.She shared the Xavier leadership's Oct. 16 statement assuring the private Catholic school's community that while its policies uphold the First Amendment, 'Speakers and events that are designed to spread hatred and invoke violence ... are not welcome and will not be tolerated on our campus.'Leon said Spencer has not requested to speak at Xavier.Spencer's attorney, Kyle Bristow, has said Spencer will be at UC on March 14, during spring break. The school said no contract has been signed.Bristow has lawsuits pending against Ohio State, Michigan State and Penn State for not allowing Spencer to speak.UC English professor Russel Durst wrote to Pinto twice by email, first urging him not to allow Spencer to appear and then criticizing him for allegedly buckling under pressure.'As a Jewish person, I feel personally targeted,' Durst said in an interview on Tuesday. 'I feel that it's not educational at all; it's just promoting hate.'Durst said that he is 'very fond of' and impressed by Pinto overall as president and added that if Spencer is speaking at UC, he is pleased it will be during spring break when most students and employees will be away.Messages released by the school indicated that faculty, alumni and students who wrote in the days following the decision to allow Spencer to speak were nearly evenly divided between supporting and condemning it.'Leaders often lack the strength and clarity to handle such conflicts in a principled, honest, and effective way,' UC professor Louis Bilionis, the law school's former dean, wrote to Pinto. 'Thanks for leading UC well.'Spencer uses the term 'alt-right' to describe a mix of racism, white nationalism and anti-immigration views. Pinto, who took office in February after serving as acting president at the University of Louisville, was born in India.The records show that UC officials quickly drew up 'talking points' for communicating with the parents of students, emphasizing that student safety and security would be the top priority. The school created an online site about the decision.The UC Progressive Alliance, a self-described coalition of student groups, wrote to school officials that while it agreed that free speech is a right, 'we as students have the right to feel safe on campus' and that Spencer's presence on campus would threaten that right.Authorities estimated security costs at $600,000 for Spencer's Oct. 19 appearance at the University of Florida, where counter-protesters far outnumbered Spencer supporters and booed him off stage. Spencer was a scheduled speaker at a 'Unite the Right' rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August that led to deadly violence when a man struck and killed a protester with his car.A late September email exchange showed that a school events services official initially indicated Spencer could book a space for a $1,500 fee. Georgia State University student Cameron Padgett, who made the request, responded with thanks and advised: 'The speaker Richard Spencer is controversial, so I wanted to be clear on that.'Padgett's comment turned out to be an understatement amid the flurry of responses that followed.___Follow Dan Sewell at http://www.twitter.com/dansewell
  • Closing arguments are set to take place in the New York trial of three former South American soccer officials charged in the corruption scandal engulfing the sport's governing body.Ex-presidents of national soccer federations in Paraguay, Peru and Brazil have denied accusations they participated in a vast conspiracy involving tens of millions of dollars in bribes paid in exchange for help winning lucrative commercial rights to the FIFA (FEE'-fuh) World Cup and other tournaments.The trial has seen a juror dismissed for sleeping, a defendant accused of threatening a witness by running his fingers across his throat in a slicing motion and surprise testimony by a former member of the Jonas Brothers.Prosecutors rested their case Tuesday. The defense chose not to put on a case. Closing arguments are set to begin Wednesday morning.
  • Japan’s recent decision to up its patrols in response to rising appearances of mysterious ships implies there might be a serious problem with North Korea’s food supply. >> Read more trending news The Guardian reports that at least 28 North Korean boats washed ashore or were found adrift in Japanese waters, the result of North Korean fishermen’s decision to push farther and farther out to sea to make bigger catches for their military, citizens and exports to China. Several of the vessels found were “ghost ships,” labeled as such when found with either a dead or missing crew. Though the number of stray vessels found in Japan this year is consistent with last year’s number, some have expressed concern for the high number of ships found in November compared to the number found last November. The Washington Post offered possible explanations for the spike in appearances, including food shortages which may be the result of tougher sanctions recently passed against the country. “North Korean fishermen have to work harder than ever before, and they have to go farther out into the sea, but they don’t have new boats,” said Atsuhito Isozaki, associate professor of North Korean studies at Keio University in Tokyo. “Plus, North Korea doesn’t have enough gasoline anymore, so they’re running out of fuel.” The concerning state of North Koreans’ food supply was highlighted last month following the dramatic rescue of a North Korean soldier who defected while on duty. Oh Chong Song abandoned his post in November and began to run toward South Korea. He was shot at more than 40 times by his fellow soldiers, and at least five bullets hit him. South Korean soldiers were able to crawl to the area where he lay and he was transportedto a hospital by a United Nations Command helicopter. While rushing to save his life, trauma surgeon Lee Cook-Jong discovered parasitic worms, some were over 10 inches long, in the soldier’s digestive tract. The worms, which have been discovered in other defectors, indicated the use of a detrimental, government-backed approach to health and agriculture in the country: night soil. “Night soil” is a fertilizer made up of human excrement and used by North Korean farmers. There is a perception in the country that night soil makes food taste better and the method has even been personally supported by dictator Kim Jong-Un. The five-hour surgery consisted of removing a bullet, fixing a number of wounds caused by the bullet and removing the parasitic worms that were making their way out of Oh Chong Song’s body. “In my over 20-year-long career as a surgeon, I have only seen something like this in a textbook,” Cook-Jong later said of the flesh-colored parasites he found.
  • Three South Florida men have been charged in connection with a widely viewed video showing a shark being dragged behind a fast-moving boat. >> Read more trending news Michael Wenzel, 21, of Palmetto, Robert Lee Benac, 28, of Bradenton, and Spencer Heintz, 23, of Palmetto, were all charged with multiple crimes in connection with the video and other social media posts. The charges came after a four-month investigation, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said. 'As we've said since this video and other images came to light, these actions have no place in Florida, where we treasure and conserve our natural resources for everyone,' said Commission Chairman Bo Rivard. 'We appreciate the patience and support of the public as our law enforcement investigators worked with the Hillsborough County State Attorney's Office to identify a number of serious violations that will be brought to the courts for adjudication. It is our hope these charges will send a clear message to others that this kind of behavior involving our fish and wildlife will not be tolerated.' All three men face two counts of felony aggravated animal cruelty. Benac and Wenzel were also charged with one count of misdemeanor illegal method of taking. >> Related: Mother, daughter arrested, accused of beating student at bus stop Florida Gov. Rick Scott released the following statement on the charges: “I was outraged by the sickening video of a shark being horribly abused earlier this year. Florida has no tolerance for this mistreatment, and I am proud of the hard work of FWC law enforcement during this investigation to hold these individuals accountable for their horrific actions.”
  • Doug Jones has been declared the winner of the Alabama Senate election. The race was called for Jones by CNN, Fox News and the Associated Press. With 99 percent of the precincts reporting, Doug Jones is ahead 49.6 percent to 48.8 percent for Roy Moore.
  • An Alaska lawmaker who has been accused by several women of inappropriate behavior refused to resign on Tuesday amid calls for him to leave his post from leaders of the House majority and the head of the state Democratic Party.State Rep. Dean Westlake, who is recovering from heart surgery, said he sought the counsel of friends, family, native leaders, elders, and God when making his decision to remain in office. He announced his decision in a statement, and was confirmed by his staff.'I want to once again apologize to any woman whom I have made uncomfortable with either my actions or words. I never intended to hurt anyone, but I understand now that I have. I am truly sorry for that, and I want to thank anyone who came forward. Doing so required strength and bravery,' he said.No one from the House majority was able to comment Tuesday evening, and a message left with the state Democratic party was not immediately returned.He vowed to become an ally and supporter of women moving forward. 'I am committed to being better and to changing my behavior. I will learn from this experience,' he said.His announcement came after a former legislative aide, Olivia Garrett, complained last spring to House leadership about two instances of unwelcome physical contact from the Democrat at work-related functions outside the Capitol. Garrett decided to go public after she said no one informed her how the matter was handled.Six other female aides then came forward to accuse Westlake of acting inappropriately toward them or making them feel uncomfortable, the Anchorage Daily News reported Friday. The paper said those women asked not to be identified.Garrett, who did not work for Westlake, told The Associated Press on Friday that she recently filed a human resources complaint against Westlake and said it was being investigated.'These allegations have become a confidential personnel matter, and in respecting the process I cannot discuss the details,' Westlake said.Garrett initially complained last March in a letter to House Speaker Bryce Edgmon and House Majority Leader Chris Tuck.She provided the AP with a copy of a letter, in which she details the physical contact, including one incident in which she says Westlake grabbed her buttocks.Edgmon, a Democrat from Dillingham, said he spoke with Westlake after receiving the complaint in March. Tuck, an Anchorage Democrat, declined to comment on the matter to the AP, saying it was a personnel issue.Sexual misconduct allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein in October have led women around the country to come forward with claims against powerful men in politics, entertainment and media.The Alaska Legislature recently put together a panel to recommend changes to its policy on sexual and other workplace harassment.After Garrett went public, Westlake issued a statement saying he welcomed a review and updated sexual harassment policies.'I firmly believe that everyone deserves a safe, healthy, and professional working environment,' he said. 'I sincerely apologize if an encounter with me has made anyone uncomfortable. That has certainly never been my intent.'Leaders of the House majority coalition on Friday called for Westlake to resign after the other women came forward.A statement from majority leaders, released by Edgmon, said the coalition, largely comprised of Democrats, takes seriously its obligation that everyone who works in the Capitol should feel safe and respected.'In light of recent reports of inappropriate behavior related to his position in the Legislature, House leadership believes Representative Dean Westlake should resign from the office his constituents sent him to Juneau to represent,' the statement said.The chairwoman of the state Democratic Party, Casey Steinau, said Westlake should immediately step down.'There is no place where sexual misconduct, harassment, or sexual assault is acceptable,' Steinau said in a statement. 'Elected officials, regardless of party must be held accountable.'Westlake is a freshman lawmaker from the western Alaska community of Kotzebue. He narrowly won the Democratic primary over incumbent state Rep. Benjamin Nageak of Barrow in August 2016. Nageak challenged the results, claiming election workers botched the election, which Westlake won by eight votes.Nageak won at the state court level, but the Alaska Supreme Court reversed that decision and awarded Westlake the primary election. He was unopposed in the general election___Associated Press writer Becky Bohrer in Juneau, Alaska, contributed to this report.
  • Doug Jones, a Democrat who once prosecuted two Ku Klux Klansmen in a deadly church bombing and has now broken the Republican lock grip on Alabama, is the state's new U.S. senator.Here are some facts about Jones:CLOSE TO HOMEJones, 63, grew up in the working-class city of Fairfield, just west of Birmingham, an area where steel mills once belched smoke that left a rust-colored haze hanging over the metro area. His father was a steelworker and so was one of his grandfathers; the other worked in a coal mine. Jones spent time working in a mill when not in school.Now an attorney in private practice, Jones lives just a few miles from his hometown in the hilly suburb of Mountain Brook, Alabama's richest locale with an average family income estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau at $225,000 annually.DEMOCRATIC ROOTSJones got his start in government as an aide to the last Democrat elected to the U.S. Senate from Alabama, the late Howell Heflin.After graduating from Samford University's law school in 1979, Jones worked as staff counsel to the Judiciary Committee for Heflin, and Jones still considers Heflin a role model.Heflin cited his health in retiring from the Senate, and Republican Jeff Sessions was elected to replace him in 1996. Jones will now assume the seat vacated by Sessions when he was nominated as U.S. attorney general by President Donald Trump. Republican appointee Luther Strange has held the seat in the interim.CHURCH BOMBINGYears before running for Senate, Jones made a name for himself prosecuting two KKK members for the bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church, a brutal crime that killed four black girls in 1963.One Klansman was convicted in the blast in 1977, and a renewed investigation was underway by the time President Bill Clinton appointed Jones as U.S. attorney in Birmingham in 1997. Jones led a team of federal and state attorneys during trials that resulted in the convictions of Thomas Blanton Jr. in 2001 and Bobby Frank Cherry in 2002.Last year, Jones was among the speakers who urged Alabama's parole board to refuse an early release for Blanton. The board agreed, and Blanton remains in prison serving life for murder.PARTY GUYAlabama's Democratic Party has been on life support since Republicans gained ascendency years ago, holding no statewide offices and a minority in each legislative chamber, but Jones supported an effort to revive the organization in 2013.A former party chairman formed the Alabama Democratic Majority to raise money and recruit candidates, and Jones was among those publicly supportive of the effort. The foundation was dormant by 2014, but Trump's victory has helped breathe new life into local organizations, including the Democratic Party in Republican-heavy Shelby County, where officials say membership has jumped from around a dozen to more than 200 people since the 2016 election.Jones' victory can only help re-energize the party even more.
  • Trading barbs with President Donald Trump via Twitter on Tuesday, women Democrats demanded that Congress investigate past claims of sexual misconduct leveled against the President during the 2016 campaign, as several lawmakers took the extra step of asking for Mr. Trump’s resignation. “President Trump should resign. But, of course, he won’t hold himself accountable,” said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), who has emerged as the leader of efforts to pressure the President on the issue of past allegations. Mr. Trump lobbed a Twitter barb directly at the New York Democrat on Tuesday morning, labeling her a “lightweight” and “total flunky.” Lightweight Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a total flunky for Chuck Schumer and someone who would come to my office “begging” for campaign contributions not so long ago (and would do anything for them), is now in the ring fighting against Trump. Very disloyal to Bill & Crooked-USED! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2017 Gillibrand answered back, saying her voice would not be shut down by the President. You cannot silence me or the millions of women who have gotten off the sidelines to speak out about the unfitness and shame you have brought to the Oval Office. https://t.co/UbQZqubXZv — Kirsten Gillibrand (@SenGillibrand) December 12, 2017 And she was joined by other Democrats as well, in calling for the stories about the President to get more of a public airing. . @realDonaldTrump is a misogynist, compulsive liar, and admitted sexual predator. Attacks on Kirsten are the latest example that no one is safe from this bully. He must resign. https://t.co/7lNI23K7ib — Senator Mazie Hirono (@maziehirono) December 12, 2017 Are you really trying to bully, intimidate and slut-shame @SenGillibrand? Do you know who you're picking a fight with? Good luck with that, @realDonaldTrump. Nevertheless, #shepersisted. https://t.co/mYJtBZfxiu — Elizabeth Warren (@SenWarren) December 12, 2017 A day after the White House turned aside questions about past claims made by women against the President, Mr. Trump directly addressed the matter, saying that it was all “FAKE NEWS,” calling the charges against him nothing more than ‘false accusations and fabricated stories.’ Despite thousands of hours wasted and many millions of dollars spent, the Democrats have been unable to show any collusion with Russia – so now they are moving on to the false accusations and fabricated stories of women who I don’t know and/or have never met. FAKE NEWS! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2017 At a news conference on Tuesday afternoon, a group of House Democratic women asked Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC), the head of the House Oversight committee, to investigate the accusations against Mr. Trump. “At least 17 women have publicly accused the President of sexual misconduct,” the letter to Gowdy stated. “The President’s own remarks appear to back up the allegations,” the letter continued. “The President has boasted in public and in crude terms that he feels at liberty to perpetrate such conduct against women.” “The ‘Me-Too’ movement has arrived,” said Rep. Lois Frankel (D-FL). “Victims must be heard, perpetrators must be held accountable.” 'To date, more than 17 women have publicly come forward to accuse Donald Trump of sexual misconduct,' lawmaker says. 'Simply said, Americans deserve the truth.' https://t.co/mIxkZRGYzP pic.twitter.com/QhBvmGSxE1 — CBS News (@CBSNews) December 12, 2017 At a news conference, Frankel said the letter – which originally had 58 signatures – had swiftly jumped to over 100 in all. “Americans deserve the truth,” Frankel told reporters. While the Democratic women were in the spotlight, some of their male colleagues also chimed in with calls for a more thorough review of the accusations against Mr. Trump. “If you called for Franken to step down, don’t you also have to say it is the right thing for the President to resign?” said Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) on CNN.
  • After enduring weeks of speculation on what would happen if controversial Republican Roy Moore wins a seat in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers on Capitol Hill are waiting like everyone else to see the next act in this political play, as Senate GOP leaders have made clear they won’t give Moore a hero’s welcome if he does emerge victorious on Tuesday night in Alabama. As Senators arrived for their first vote of the week on Monday evening, Republicans ran a gauntlet of reporters asking a simple question – will Roy Moore soon be in the U.S. Senate? “I don’t know,” said Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), the senior Senator from the Yellowhammer State, who has made clear that he did not vote for Moore, but instead wrote in another Republican in the Alabama Senate race. Pressed again to say if Moore would win, Shelby re-emphasized his vote. “Not with my help,” he said. The polls in Alabama have been back and forth in recent weeks. The latest on Monday from Fox News, showed a 10 point lead for Moore’s Democratic opponent, Doug Jones. Fox News Poll: Enthused Democrats give Jones lead over Moore in Alabama https://t.co/7RZmnq0zXN #FoxNews — Mihai Scorobete (@MihaiScorobete) December 11, 2017 “We’ll see,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), who denounced Moore, and gave $100 to the Jones campaign. “At this point it’s what I call a turnout race,” said Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL), when asked who would win. “It depends who gets their vote out.” While Byrne believes the edge is with the GOP, political pollsters say his turnout argument is on point. “Tomorrow’s Alabama Senate special election will depend on which candidate has more people turn out to vote for him,” pollster Frank Luntz wrote Monday on Twitter. This group of conservative Alabama voters say all 9 of Roy Moore's accusers have been paid to lie against him. #ALSen https://t.co/OT1vV33KRT — Frank Luntz (@FrankLuntz) December 9, 2017 Outside the Senate chamber, many Republicans wanted to wait and see the vote totals before worrying about their next move. “Let’s see what happens,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), as he was pursued by a group of reporters. “That’s a decision that I leave to the Leader,” Johnson said when asked how Moore should be dealt with by his fellow Republicans – if he wins. “I’m not going to make a call on his qualifications,” said Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC) of Moore. “That will be a decision that will be made after the outcome of the election.” Others were quiet on the subject of Roy Moore for an obvious reason. “The answer to your question is, I’m doing good,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA), before I had even asked the Senator a question. “I can’t talk to you about anything because I’m the Ethics Chairman,” Isakson added, as the Georgia Republican would be in charge of any ethics review of Moore, which the Senate Majority Leader has made clear he would ask for that if Moore is elected. Isakson – and his GOP colleagues – will find out Tuesday night what’s next for them, and what’s next for Roy Moore.
  • A couple in Edmond solved a mystery after their child’s pacifiers kept disappearing. The mother and father couldn't figure out what was happening to their child's pacifiers until the baby's grandmother saw the family dog swipe one off a counter.  One nauseous pooch and a trip to their veterinarian's office confirmed the couple's hunch. The family’s dog, named Dovey, had 21 pacifiers lodged in her stomach.  Dovey is on the mend and home, but the vet cautioned pet owners that 'dogs will eat anything, anytime.'  
  • The Broken Arrow Police Department now has an Unmanned Aerial System Program, better known as a drone. They say it will be used for Crime and Collision Scene Investigation, Emergency Management Incidents, Search and Rescue Operations, and Tactical Situations. They make a point to point out it won't be used for Routine Patrol, Warrantless Searches, or as a Weapons Platform. The drone was made possible by a donation from alumni of the Citizens Police Academy.
  • A scuffle with and Oklahoma police officer led to the death of a man over the weekend. Oklahoma City Police Sgt. Robbie Robertson says an officer responded to a request to check on a person lying on the side of the road. Police say when the fight started after the officer approached the man. He knocked her pepper spray away. She then attempted to use a Taser and he took that from her and tried to use it on her. Robertson says the officer then drew her gun and fired, killing the man. The officer has been taken to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries to her face and hands.