ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
64°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 70° L 63°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    64°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 70° L 63°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    66°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 70° L 63°
  • cloudy-day
    68°
    Evening
    Cloudy. H 70° L 63°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

National News

    Police are investigating after a 6-year-old boy and three of his family members were shot Sunday evening in the parking lot of a Texas Roadhouse steakhouse in San Antonio. >> Read more trending news Police Chief William McManus said Sunday that the shooting, which happened as people were waiting outside the restaurant to eat, left the 6-year-old with a gunshot wound to his leg. Police said two of the boy’s three injured family members, all adults in their 20s, were hospitalized Sunday in critical but stable condition. The shooting happened around 8:40 p.m. outside the Texas Roadhouse steakhouse on Cinema Ridge, the San Antonio Express-News reported. “We do not believe that this shooting is random,” McManus said. “There were a number of people that were standing (outside the restaurant). All the people that were hit were from the same family.” The gunman, who has not been identified, fired about 10 shots at the family within 15 feet of the front of Texas Roadhouse, the Express-News reported. He was masked at the time of the shooting, according to the newspaper. Police continue to investigate the attack.
  • One of the teachers killed in last week’s mass shooting at a Florida high school once told his fiancée what to say at his funeral if he ever was killed in a school shooting, the New York Post reported. >> Read more trending news Scott Beigel, who was watching coverage of a school shooting on television with his fiancée, said her “Promise me if this ever happens to me, you will tell them the truth — tell them what a jerk I am, don’t talk about the hero stuff,” Gwen Gossler said during Beigel’s funeral at Temple Beth El in Boca Raton. “OK, Scott, I did what you asked,’’ Gossler said during Beigel’s funeral service, the Post reported. “Now I can tell the truth. You are an amazingly special person. You are my first love and my soulmate.’’ >> Florida shooting heroes: 3 coaches, teachers gave lives for students Beigel, 35, a geography teacher at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, was one of 17 people killed when a gunman opened fire at the South Florida school on Valentine’s Day. Beigel had unlocked his classroom to allow students to enter and was killed when he tried to lock the door again, the Post reported. Stoneman Douglas student Kelsey Friend told ABC’s “Good Morning America” that Beigel saved her life. “He unlocked the door and let us in,” Friend said. “I had thought he was behind me, but he wasn’t. When he opened the door, he had to relock it so we could stay safe, but he didn’t get the chance to. “He was in the doorway and the door was still open and the shooter probably didn’t know we were in there because he was lying on the floor. If the shooter had come in the room, I probably wouldn’t be (alive).” Beigel was born in Dix Hills, New York, and attended the University of Miami, according to his obituary. He also coached the Stoneman Douglas cross-country team and was a counselor at Camp Starlight in Pennsylvania. A post on a Facebook page for the camp called him a “friend and hero.”
  • Police, along with the FBI, are searching for a missing 5-year-old boy in Kansas. Lucas Hernandez was reported missing Saturday evening. He was last seen at 3 p.m. in his bedroom by his stepmother, after she took a shower and fell asleep, KAKE reported. Police were called more than 3 hours later, at 6:15 p.m., to alert them he was missing. As of Sunday, an Amber Alert was not issued because there was no indication that he was abducted, KAKE reported. >> Read more trending news  A relative of Lucas told KSN, “He’s a bright little boy. He loves school. He loves his dad, his stepmom and his siblings. We just want him home safe, and if you have any information, anything about Lucas, please bring him home safely.” But a great aunt of Lucas’ said they were worried about him, The Wichita Eagle reported. Sally Rasmussen told the paper that she called the Kansas Department for Children and Families last year. His great grandmother, Jeannie Houchin, said that she was told that there was an investigation launched by the child protection agency, but the department didn’t confirm the women’s allegations The Eagle reported. Police searched Lucas’ home and neighborhood using K-9 units, but didn’t find anything. They also went door-to-door asking neighbors if they noticed anything, The Eagle reported. The FBI has sent its Child Action Rapid Deployment team to help find Lucas, KAKE reported.
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump (all times local): 9:55 a.m. President Donald Trump is spending President's Day at his private golf club in West Palm Beach. Trump has been in Florida for the weekend. He spent his time largely at his Mar-a-Lago estate as White House aides advised him against golfing too soon after a deadly school shooting in a nearby community. The White House did not immediately answer questions about whether the president was playing golf Monday. The president also visited the golf club Sunday evening. An avid golfer, Trump heads to one of his courses almost every weekend. President Barack Obama took heavy criticism in 2014 when he went golfing during a vacation just minutes after denouncing the militants who had beheaded an American journalist. He later said he 'should've anticipated the optics' of immediately going to play golf. ___ 9:40 a.m. The White House says President Donald Trump supports efforts to improve the federal gun background check system after a school shooting in Florida that left 17 dead. Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday that the president had spoken to Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican, about a bipartisan bill designed to strengthen the FBI database of prohibited gun buyers. Sanders said, 'While discussions are ongoing and revisions are being considered, the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.' The bill would penalize federal agencies that fail to provide the necessary records and reward states that comply with federal grant preferences and other incentives. Trump has been a strong supporter of gun rights and the National Rifle Association.
  • Police in Florida are searching for a 12-year-old girl who was reported missing early Monday, seven months after her sister went missing and was found dead several days later, the Bradenton Herald reported. >> Read more trending news The Manatee County Sheriff’s Office said Jalyssa Shannon left her home around 9 p.m. Sunday. Her mother, Michelle Mosley, called deputies around 1:30 a.m. when the girl did not come home, The Tampa Bay Times reported. Jalyssa’s sister, 13-year-old Janessa Shannon, was found dead in Riverview, Florida, on July 12, 2017, 10 days after she was reported missing, the Herald reported. Janessa’s body was found in a nature preserve near the Riverview home of her father, Nahshon Shannon, the Times reported. >> Police, FBI search for missing 5-year-old Kansas boy In October 2017, Nahshon Shannon. 37. was arrested on charges of first-degree felony murder and aggravated child abuse, the Times reported. Jalyssa is about 4-foot 11-inches tall and weighs approximately 175 pounds, sheriff’s deputies said. She has black hair and brown eyes, and was last seen wearing a black shirt and capri pants.  
  • Former Associated Press photographer Max Desfor, whose photo of hundreds of Korean War refugees crawling across a damaged bridge in 1950 helped win him a Pulitzer Prize, died Monday. He was 104. Desfor died at his apartment in Silver Spring, Maryland, where he'd been living in his retirement, said his son, Barry. Desfor volunteered to cover the Korean War for the news service when the North invaded the South in June 1950. He parachuted into North Korea with U.S troops and retreated with them after forces from the North, joined by the Chinese, pushed south. He was in a Jeep near the North Korean capital of Pyongyang when he spotted a bridge that had been hit by bombing along the Taedong River. Thousands of refugees were lined up on the north bank waiting their turn to cross the river. 'We came across this incredible sight,' he recalled in 1997 for an AP oral history. 'All of these people who are literally crawling through these broken-down girders of the bridge. They were in and out of it, on top, underneath, and just barely escaping the freezing water.' Desfor climbed a 50-foot-high section of the bridge to photograph the refugees as they fled for their lives. 'My hands got so cold I could barely trip the shutter on my camera,' he remembered. 'I couldn't even finish a full pack of film. It was just that cold.' The Pulitzer jury in 1951 determined that Desfor's photos from Korea the previous year had 'all the qualities which make for distinguished news photography — imagination, disregard for personal safety, perception of human interest and the ability to make the camera tell the whole story.' The Pulitzer board honored his overall coverage of the war, based on a portfolio of more than 50 photos, and cited the Taedong River bridge shot in particular. A native of New York, Desfor was born in the Bronx on Nov. 8, 1913, and attended Brooklyn College. He joined the AP in 1933 as a messenger. After teaching himself the basics of photography and moonlighting as a baby photographer, he began shooting occasional assignments for the AP. He became a staff photographer in the Baltimore bureau in 1938 and moved to the Washington bureau a year later. During World War II, Desfor photographed the crew of the Enola Gay after the B-29 landed in Saipan from its mission to drop an atomic bomb on Hiroshima in August 1945. He was with the first wave of Marines at Tokyo Bay shortly after Japan's surrender that month and photographed the official surrender ceremony aboard the USS Missouri on Sept. 2, 1945. Desfor worked for the AP in the Philippines and in India, where he photographed Mahatma Gandhi and later covered the assassinated leader's funeral in 1948. He also worked in the AP's Rome bureau and was set to return to the U.S. when war broke out in Korea. After the war Desfor served as supervising editor of Wide World Photos, the AP's photo service, and returned to Asia in 1968 as photo chief for the region. He retired from the AP in 1978, then joined U.S. News & World Report as photo director. Desfor and his wife, Clara, raised a son, Barry, of Wauconda, Illinois. She died in 2004. In January 2012, when he was 98, Desfor and his longtime companion, Shirley Belasco, surprised guests at a party celebrating her 90th birthday by marrying in front of their guests. They had been friends since the 1980s when the Desfors and Ms. Belasco lived in the same Silver Springs apartment building and became a couple a few years after his wife's death. A photo Desfor took during his long career that had particular meaning to him also came from the Korean War. Walking near a field he spotted two hands, blue from cold, sticking up in the snow and photographed them. The hands, which had been bound, belonged to one of several civilians taken prisoner and executed, their bodies left to be covered by snowfall. 'I labeled that picture, later on, 'Futility,' because it's always been — I've always felt that it's the civilians caught in the crossfire, the civilians, the innocent civilians, how futile it is for war,' he said for the oral history. 'That epitomized it to me.
  • A 15-year-old Florida boy was arrested after posting a message on Instagram threatening to kill people at several Broward County schools, authorities said.  >> Read more trending news Just after midnight Friday, Broward Sheriff's Office detectives were notified about the online post from a Fort Lauderdale teen. He posted it one day after 17 people were killed during a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.  The teen told detectives that the post was a joke aimed to scare his cousin and he appeared remorseful, according to a sheriff’s news release.  The juvenile is facing one count of sending a written threat to kill, which is a third-degree felony.
  • Consumers Energy will phase out electricity production from coal by 2040 to slash emissions of heat-trapping gases that cause global warming, the Michigan utility's president and CEO told The Associated Press. The utility plans to generate 40 percent of its power from renewable sources such as wind and solar energy by then, Patti Poppe said in an interview ahead of a public announcement Monday. She said the utility will also will rely on natural gas, hydropower and improved efficiency to meet customer needs. Consumers Energy and DTE Energy Co., which supply most of Michigan's electricity, are among many U.S. providers moving away from coal even as President Donald Trump's administration boosts fossil fuels and seeks to unravel former President Barack Obama's policies that promoted cleaner power. 'We believe that climate change is real and we can do our part by reducing our greenhouse gas emissions, and we also believe it doesn't have to cost more to do it,' Poppe said. 'We believe we're going to be on the right side of history on this issue.' Coal is becoming less competitive as the cost of producing renewable energy steadily falls, she added. Power companies are under increasing pressure to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, which are trapping heat in the atmosphere and promoting what scientists describe as a dangerously warming climate that will endanger human health and natural systems. A 2016 state law set a renewables target for Michigan utilities of 15 percent by 2021. Environmentalists are circulating petitions for a statewide ballot initiative that would require 30 percent by 2030, which Consumers Energy and DTE have criticized as unnecessary. Poppe told the AP that Consumers Energy will file a plan by June with the Michigan Public Service Commission with a detailed timetable for phasing out coal and supplying its customers with power from a mix of renewable and traditional sources. Commission approval will be needed before the utility can proceed. The utility closed seven its 12 coal-fired plants in 2016, which the company said had lowered its carbon generation by 38 percent from 2008 levels. Its long-term strategy will yield an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions, Poppe said. Rapidly developing technology and falling prices are making green energy more cost-effective than it was even a decade ago, when many in the industry warned that mandating use of renewables would drive up rates. Particularly helpful are improvements of systems for storing renewable energy for use when the wind isn't blowing or skies are cloudy, Poppe said. 'We don't have to make a sucker's choice of either affordable prices or clean energy,' she said. 'We can do what's right for the planet and the customers we serve. We don't think there's a trade-off to be made here.' Consumers Energy owns two wind turbine farms and buys power from a third. It co-owns with DTE a hydroelectric plant on Lake Michigan. The utility says it is upgrading its natural gas infrastructure around the state. Along with its renewable energy plan, Consumers Energy also announced a five-year plan for reducing its environmental footprint that includes saving 1 billion gallons of water, reducing waste sent to landfills by 35 percent and restoring or improving 5,000 acres of land. The utility says its customers include 6.7 million of Michigan's 10 million residents. ___ Follow John Flesher on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/johnflesher ___ Sign up for the AP's weekly newsletter showcasing our best reporting from the Midwest and Texas: http://apne.ws/2u1RMfv
  • A Wisconsin family had an unexpected visitor over the weekend, and it was all caught on security camera. A cougar was spotted in the backyard of a home in the town of Brookfield on Saturday, WITI reported. >> Read more trending news  Police and officials from the Department of Natural Resources confirmed that the animal was a cougar and was considered “passive,” thinking it was injured or hit by a car, WITI reported. They didn’t use a tranquilizer gun because of how close the animal was to homes. It was gone when DNR officials arrived to assess the situation Sunday, according to WITI. But not before it visited a home, even taking a look inside, WITI reported.
  • America's union leaders are about to find out if they were right to fiercely oppose Neil Gorsuch's nomination to the Supreme Court as a pivotal, potentially devastating vote against organized labor. The newest justice holds the deciding vote in a case to be argued Feb. 26 that could affect the financial viability of unions that are major supporters of Democratic candidates and causes. The unions represent more than 5 million government workers in 24 states and the District of Columbia who could be affected by the outcome. The other eight justices split 4 to 4 when the issue was last at the court in 2016. The court is being asked to jettison a 41-year-old ruling that allows states to require government employees who don't want to be union members to pay for their share of activities the union undertakes on behalf of all workers, not just its members. These so-called fair share fees cover the costs of collective bargaining and grievance procedures to deal with workplace complaints. Employees who don't join the union do not have to pay for the unions' political activities. Conservative anti-union interests are backing an Illinois government employee who says that being forced to pay anything at all violates his First Amendment speech rights. 'I'm not against unions,' said the employee, 65-year-old Mark Janus, who is represented by American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 31. 'I don't oppose the right of workers to organize. But the right to say no to unions is just as important as the right to say yes.' He said he opposes his union's fight for wage and benefit increases when the state is 'in pretty terrible financial condition right now.' William Messenger, the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation lawyer who is representing Janus at the Supreme Court, said everything the union does, including its bargaining with the state, is political and employees should not be forced to pay for it. The issue might have been settled in Janus' favor two years ago. In January 2016, the court heard an identical complaint from California teachers and appeared to be ready to decide that states have no right to compel workers to pay money to unions. But less than a month later, Justice Antonin Scalia died and the court soon after announced its tie, in effect a win for the unions. The one-sentence opinion did not identify how each justice voted, but the court appeared split between its conservatives and liberals, the same breakdown seen in two other recent cases about public sector unions. Those unions cheered President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to fill the court's vacancy. But the Senate took no action on Garland's nomination, President Donald Trump won the election and the union opponents rushed new cases to the court to challenge the union fee arrangement. Union sentiment about Gorsuch was unvarnished when he was nominated and confirmed. 'In Neil Gorsuch, Trump has nominated an extremist judge intent on overturning basic, well-established Supreme Court precedents,' American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten said. Following Gorsuch's Senate hearing, the Service Employees International Union said, 'Throughout the last three days of testimony, Judge Gorsuch has again proved that he isn't the kind of judge who gives working people a fair shot at justice.' Having won an unexpected reprieve in 2016 and with Gorsuch on the bench, labor leaders are predictably fatalistic about where this case is headed, focusing on how they might adapt to a world without compulsory payments. Union leaders have described the years-long fight against fair share fees as a political attack launched by wealthy special interests that want to destroy the labor movement Their fear is that a ruling for Janus that frees employees from supporting the unions financially will cause union members to stop paying dues, too. 'Are you going to lose some people?' asked Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. 'Sure. I'm not going to lie to you.' Three Nobel Prize-winning economists and 33 other scholars described the potential fallout as a classic free-rider problem. 'If individuals are not required to contribute, many who undisputedly benefit will nevertheless withhold their contributions out of simple self-interest, and others will withhold their contributions to avoid being taken advantage of by the free riders,' the academics wrote in a Supreme Court filing in support of the unions. But Saunders, Weingarten and other union presidents said their focus has been on reconnecting with members, who have been more engaged since Trump's election. 'The opportunity here is to re-engage in a way that the reason for unions in the first place becomes a prominent reason again,' Weingarten said.
  • A 30-year-old man died of injuries after a shooting in Atlanta's Buckhead neighborhood that police believe involved an Uber Eats driver. >> Watch the news report here Police say Ryan Thornton, 30, ordered food from the app to be delivered to the Concorde Condominium on Pharr Court South late Saturday. At 11:30 p.m., Thornton walked away from the delivery car with his order.  Police said words may have been exchanged, and that's when shots were fired from the delivery car. The driver took off in a white Volkswagen.  One of the people WSB-TV's Lauren Pozen spoke with lives close to where the incident happened. The person, who didn't want to be identified, said he heard five gunshots go off outside his apartment.  >> Read more trending news  Thorton died at Grady Memorial Hospital.  If you’ve never heard of Uber Eats, it’s a smartphone app that many people use to order take-out. Uber told WSB-TV that it has a 'no weapons' policy for its drivers.  As the search for the driver continues, this shooting has those who use the app a little hesitant to continue to do so.  'Something needs to be done to further the safety of Uber Eats and make us feel safe,” said the man who lives near the scene. Uber said a statement that it is shocked and saddened by the news and is working with the Atlanta Police Department. 
  • Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones said Sunday he will take steps to bolster local school safety by training those who work there. Jones posted to social media that his office will offer free conceal-and-carry classes to a limited number of teachers in Butler County. He also said training on how to react during school shootings would be provided. He said the details would be coming soon online at the Butler County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page. Jones said Saturday he has “been saying this for years” as he tweeted a Fox News story that Polk County, Florida, Sheriff Grady Judd said it would be a “game changer” to allow some handpicked teachers to carry firearms in the classroo Jones, in a video posted Thursday, urged local schools to act now to improve school security in the wake of the mass shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school on Wednesday. He said local schools should stop doing fire drills and allow armed former police and military veterans into buildings to help protect students.
  • A self-proclaimed white nationalist was banned from a Fremont gym after the owners learned he is a leader in the alt-right community. The owners of Northwest Fitness Project say Greg Johnson is longer welcome there. “The trainer terminated his contract and we banned him from the gym,” said Kyle Davis, a co-owner of the gym. It's a move that has some people wondering if it violates a city ordinance that says 'places of public accommodation' can't discriminate based on a person's beliefs. But the owners of the gym say that ordinance doesn't apply -- because it’s not a public space. To use the space, you must be the client of a trainer. “There’s no open gym membership, it's not like people can come and go as they please,” Davis said. “Trainers come and run their own businesses out of this location.' “There's a right of first refusal of the independent trainer. And (the trainer) chose to not work with him anymore due to the harm it would cause his reputation, and not wanting to be associated with those views,” Davis said. The Southern Poverty Law Center calls Greg Johnson an 'international figure for white nationalism” and “one of the leading voices of the far-right.” In September 2017, the New York Times interviewed him undercover and posted it on its website. In the interview, Johnson says, “I would identify myself as a white nationalist. That states the goals I have politically.” When asked about people who are Jewish, Johnson says, “The solution would ultimately (be) to expel them.” Davis said he’s disturbed to hear Johnson’s views. “I would feel threatened, yes,” he said. “I'm converting to Judaism, my fiancée is Jewish and we want to raise our kids Jewish.” The owners say after Johnson was banned, a white nationalist publication told followers to post negative reviews on the gym's Yelp and Facebook pages. “We were at a five (star average review); it went down to a three,” said Matthew Holland, the other co-owner of Northwest Fitness Project. But hundreds of people supported the gym on social media, helping it bounce back. “Now we're to like a 4.8,” Holland said. “We have a great community and we didn't realize how awesome they all were. Going through a rough time like this, it was just so encouraging.” The Puget Sound Anarchists first published last week that Johnson lives in Seattle. It’s also how the gym owners found out about Johnson’s beliefs. Johnson did not comment. The gym said it heard Johnson left the area.
  • A motorist spotted a body in the street around 11:27 p.m. Saturday night. The discovery happened near Young and Quaker. Tulsa Sgt. Dave Walker tells us the medical examiner was called out to help. “They were able to determine he had a gunshot wound to the back of the head,” Walker said.  “That is the reason he died.” Investigators believe a shots fired call about an hour before the body was found is related to this case. The name of the victim hasn't been released. Police don’t have a suspect or motive for the homicide.  Anyone with information regarding the case is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.   Walker adds this is Tulsa’s fifth homicide of 2018.  
  • Today will be perfect for outdoor activities. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says we have a nice day ahead of us in and around Tulsa. “Should be topping out in the lower 60’s,” Hodges said.  “We’ll be kicking up a little more wind.” The low Sunday night will be closer to 57 degrees. If you get an extra day this weekend for Monday's holiday, make sure an umbrella is nearby. NWS is reporting we could see a few thunderstorms.   The high for Monday will be close to 61 degrees.