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National News

    Thousands of Zimbabwe residents marched in the streets of Harare on Saturday, demanding the resignation of President Robert Mugabe, CNN reported. >> Read more trending news The protests in the capital city occurred days after the 93-year-old president was put under house arrest by the army, which also detained some of his key political allies. Mugabe has been Zimbabwe’s president since 1987. People waved Zimbabwean flags while others ran beside army tanks and hugged soldiers to show their gratitude, CNN reported. “The whole nation is celebrating today. We are finally getting rid of the old man,,” said Tanashe, a Harare resident who declined to provide a second name. But Mugabe was still refusing to step down Saturday, CNN reported. He was meeting Saturday with army chief Gen. Constantino Chiwenga to discuss what happens next. Chiwenga is pushing for Mugabe to step down and for an interim president to take over, CNN reported.
  • An advanced U.S. weather satellite designed to improve the accuracy of extended forecasts has been launched into polar orbit from California.The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 1:47 a.m. PST Saturday atop a United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket.The satellite is the first of four next-generation spacecraft for NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.Circling the Earth from pole to pole 14 times a day, JPSS-1 carries a suite of five instruments intended to make global observations that will improve forecasts of severe weather events three to seven days beforehand.The satellite also will contribute to near-term weather forecasts, climate and ocean dynamics research, among many other uses.
  • A Michigan man will never forget his 19th birthday, thanks to the generosity of his co-workers, WJRT reported. >> Read more trending news Noah Robinson had been riding his bicycle to work from Saginaw to Kochville Township, pedaling the 6 ½ miles in 45 minutes regardless of the weather conditions. He works in the shipping department at Glastender and lives with his grandmother after growing up in the care of a guardian, WJRT reported. Robinson passed his driving test last week. On Nov. 10 -- the day before his birthday -- he got his biggest present. It was an Oldsmobile Alero, paid for by dozens of his co-workers, WJRT reported. '(We) congratulated him on getting a license, his birthday coming up, and then talking about how us, as a Glastender family, all pitched in to get him something,' said Dan McGrandy, an engineering tech at Glastender. They also raised enough money to pay for a year's worth of insurance,” WJRT reported. “I couldn't say anything, I was too excited, like, ‘oh my goodness,’” Robinson said. Robinson said this act of kindness showed him what it means to have a 'family'. “I've been driving it for the whole weekend and even though, every time I get ready to step foot in the car, I'm like, 'I can't believe this is happening,’” Robinson said.
  • The Latest on the U.S. threat to close the Palestinians' office in Washington (all times local):5:10 a.m.The Palestinian foreign minister says the Palestinians won't give in to what he calls 'extortion' after a U.S. threat to close their diplomatic mission in Washington.Riad Malki tells Palestine Radio that the Palestinians are waiting for further communication from the U.S. government. He says 'the ball is now in the American court.'U.S. officials — citing an American law — say the Trump administration has put the Palestinians on notice that it'll close their office in Washington unless they've entered serious peace talks with Israel. President Donald Trump has 90 days to make a decision.Malki says the U.S. move may be aimed at putting pressure on the Palestinians. But he says 'the Palestinian leadership will not accept any extortion or pressure.'___3:35 a.m.The Trump administration is using an obscure provision in U.S. law to threaten the Palestinians with the closing of their office in Washington if they don't enter serious peace talks with Israel.An administration official tells The Associated Press that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is citing the law as a reason for closing the Palestine Liberation Organization's mission.Under U.S. law, the Palestine Liberation Organization's mission must close if the Palestinians try to get the International Criminal Court to prosecute Israelis for crimes against Palestinians. A State Department official says that in September, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas crossed that line by calling on the ICC to investigate and prosecute Israelis.If President Donald Trump determines that the Palestinians are in serious negotiations with Israel, the office can remain open.
  • A 10-year-old Indiana boy is building toys from scratch to help children in need enjoy the holiday season, WISH reported. >> Read more trending news Zander Hite of Greenwood took the advice of his grandfather, Darl Hite, who gave the boy a $20 bill last winter and told him to make a difference this holiday season. Zander bought two slabs of wood to build toy cars, WISH reported. “I played with them when I was little,” he said. “And I thought they were fun to play with.” At first he built only one toy car. “It turned out to be really fun. And now I keep on making more,” he told WISH.  Since then, Zander has been an apprentice to his grandfather, who has been woodworking for several decades. Since beginning to work with wood, Zander has created 250 cars and trucks, WISH reported. “Quite a feat for a 10-year-old,” Hite said. Zander joined the Central Indiana Woodworkers club, where his grandfather has been a member for years. The organization gave him the wooden wheels for the cars and the engine to deliver these toys to kids in need, WISH reported.  As part of the club’s annual Christmas wooden toy drive, Zander donated his toys. “It was a challenging thing to accomplish to want to keep going,” he told WISH. The toys will be distributed by the wood club to different organizations around central Indiana in the coming weeks, WISH reported.
  • A former employee at a Washington State high school was charged Thursday afternoon with allegedly raping a 15-year-old student. >> Read more trending news Kristal M. Gamble, 33, was employed as an office assistant at Kent Meridian High School when she allegedly initiated an illegal sexual relationship with a boy last spring. According to Detective Melanie Robinson, the boy’s parents allegedly found sexual photos and messages on their son’s cellphone, so they contacted the Kent Police Department in September. By that time, Gamble was no longer working for the Kent School District, according to a spokesman. Gamble was arrested Wednesday. She is being held at the Norm Maleng Regional Justice Center with bail set at $10,000.
  • A drone crashed at an Arizona prison in September, and officials found drugs and cellphones aboard the vehicle, The Arizona Republic reported.  >> Read more trending news The drone crashed in a yard accessible only to corrections officers. The Arizona Department of Corrections said Thursday it is still trying to determine who was behind the delivery Sept. 24 delivery. It was the first known incident involving a drone at an Arizona state prison, corrections spokesman Andrew Wilder told the Republic. The drone flew over Arizona State Prison Complex-Lewis in Buckeye, Wilder said. The contraband had been tied up in an orange sweatshirt. Inside were two cellphones and several freezer bags filled with marijuana, images show. The items were sent to the state crime lab for fingerprint and DNA analysis, but investigators have not been able to locate the origin of the drone, Wilder said.  All airspace around prisons is federally restricted, so flying any item, including drones, near the facilities is prohibited, Wilder said. Attempting to smuggle drugs and cellphones into prisons is a felony.
  • Three male otter pups made their public debut at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo on Friday, WKYC reported. >> Read more trending news Zoo officials said the pups were born on Sept. 24 to Bitzy and Kibble. Baby otters are born with their eyes closed and need a few weeks to learn how to swim, meaning they'll be ready to join their parents, Bitzy and Kibble, on exhibit in The RainForest in the coming weeks. The zoo now has seven otters, WKYC reported.. The pups are Asian small-clawed otters, which are indigenous to Asia. They're one of the smaller species of otters and have hand-like paws, WKYC reported. They're listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. “We were aware Bitzy was pregnant based on body weight and body shape,” the zoo's animal curator Tad Schoffner told Newsweek in an email. “The otters are given their privacy and typically staff does not even know for a few days that there was a birth because the parents tend to be very protective when the pups are in their most vulnerable state.” The three pups have yet to be named, and they still weigh less than a pound, Newsweek reported. A zookeeper saw the pups playing with one another just Thursday, indicating they're developing well so far. 
  • The Trump administration has put the Palestinians on notice that it will shutter their office in Washington unless they've entered serious peace talks with Israel, U.S. officials said, potentially giving President Donald Trump more leverage as he seeks an elusive Mideast peace deal.The Palestinian foreign minister denounced the U.S. move as an attempt at 'extortion.'Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has determined that the Palestinians ran afoul of an obscure provision in a U.S. law that says the Palestine Liberation Organization's mission must close if the Palestinians try to get the International Criminal Court to prosecute Israelis for crimes against Palestinians. A State Department official said that in September, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas crossed that line by calling on the ICC to investigate and prosecute Israelis.But the law leaves Trump a way out, so Tillerson's declaration doesn't necessarily mean the office will close.Trump now has 90 days to consider whether the Palestinians are in 'direct and meaningful negotiations with Israel.' If Trump determines they are, the Palestinians can keep the office. The official said it was unclear whether the U.S. might close the office before the 90-day period expires, but said the mission remains open at least for now.Even if the office closes, the U.S. said it wasn't cutting off relations with the Palestinians and was still focused on 'a comprehensive peace agreement between the Israelis and the Palestinians.' The State Department official said in an email that 'this measure should in no way be seen as a signal that the U.S. is backing off those efforts.' The official wasn't authorized to publicly discuss the developments and spoke on condition of anonymity.The Palestinian foreign minister, Riad Malki, told Palestine Radio that the Palestinian leadership 'will not accept any extortion or pressure.' Malki said the Palestinians were waiting for further communication from the U.S. government. 'The ball is now in the American court,' he said.The Israeli Embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Although the Israelis and Palestinians are not engaged in active, direct negotiations, Trump's administration has been working all year to broker a peace deal that would end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Led by Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law and a senior aide, White House officials have been preparing a peace proposal they intend to put forward at an unspecified time.The Palestinians, though publicly supportive of the U.S. effort, have been skeptical because Trump's close ties to Israel suggest whatever deal he proposes might be unfavorable to them. The threat of losing their office in the U.S. capital could become another pressure point as the Trump administration seeks to persuade the Palestinians to come to the table.The PLO is the group that formally represents all Palestinians. Although the U.S. does not recognize Palestinian statehood, the PLO maintains a 'general delegation' office in Washington that facilitates Palestinian officials' interactions with the U.S. government.The United States allowed the PLO to open a mission in Washington in 1994, a move that required then-President Bill Clinton to waive a law that said the Palestinians couldn't have an office. In 2011, under the Obama administration, the United States started letting the Palestinians fly their flag over the office, an upgrade to the status of their mission that the Palestinians hailed as historic.Israel opposes any Palestinian membership in United Nations-related organizations until a peace deal has been reached.The Trump administration has not revealed any details about its effort to bring about a peace deal that would ostensibly grant the Palestinians an independent state in exchange for an end to its conflict with the Israelis. But Kushner and other top Trump aides have been shuttling to the region to meet with Palestinians, Israelis and officials from neighboring Arab nations as it prepares to put forward a peace plan.The requirement that the PLO office be closed if the Palestinians back an International Criminal Court move came in a little-noticed provision in U.S. law that says the United States can't allow the Palestinians to have a Washington office if they try to 'influence a determination by the ICC to initiate a judicially authorized investigation, or to actively support such an investigation, that subjects Israeli nationals to an investigation for alleged crimes against Palestinians.'Abbas, the Palestinian leader, said in his speech at the U.N. General Assembly in September that the Palestinians had 'called on the International Criminal Court to open an investigation and to prosecute Israeli officials for their involvement in settlement activities and aggressions against our people.'The U.S. law says that if the government determines the Palestinians have breached that requirement, it triggers a 90-day review period in which the president must decide whether to let the office stay open anyway. The president is allowed to waive the requirement only if he certifies to Congress 'that the Palestinians have entered into direct and meaningful negotiations with Israel.'The provision doesn't explicitly define what would constitute direct or meaningful negotiations.___Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP and Matthew Lee at http://twitter.com/APDiploWriter
  • The ultra-wealthy, especially those with dynastic businesses — like President Donald Trump and his family — do very well under a major Republican tax bill moving in the Senate, as they do under legislation passed this week by the House.Want to toast the anticipated tax win with champagne or a beer — or maybe you're feeling Shakespearean and prefer to quaff mead from a pewter mug? That would cheer producers of beer, wine, liquor — and mead, the ancient beverage fermented from honey. Tax rates on their sales would be reduced under the Senate bill.On the other hand, people living in high-tax states, who deduct their local property, income and sales taxes from what they owe Uncle Sam, could lose out from the complete or partial repeal of the deductions. And an estimated 13 million Americans could lose health insurance coverage over 10 years under the Senate bill.Some winners and losers:__WINNERS— Wealthy individuals and their heirs win big. The hottest class-warfare debate around the tax overhaul legislation involves the inheritance tax on multimillion-dollar estates. Democrats wave the legislation's targeting of the tax as a red flag in the face of Republicans, as proof that they're out to benefit wealthy donors. The House bill initially doubles the limits — to $11 million for individuals and $22 million for couples — on how much money in the estate can be exempted from the inheritance tax, then repeals it entirely after 2023. The Senate version also doubles the limits but doesn't repeal the tax.Then there's the alternative minimum tax, a levy aimed at ensuring that higher-earning people pay at least some tax. It disappears in both bills.And the House measure cuts tax rates for many of the millions of 'pass-through' businesses big and small — including partnerships and specially organized corporations — whose profits are taxed at the owners' personal income rate. That's potential cha-ching for Trump's far-flung property empire and the holdings of his daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner. The Senate bill lets pass-through owners deduct some of the earnings and then pay at their personal income rate on the remainder.— Corporations win all around, with a tax rate slashed from 35 percent to 20 percent in both bills — though they'd have to wait a year for it under the Senate measure. Trump and the administration view it as an untouchable centerpiece of the legislation.— U.S. oil companies with foreign operations would pay reduced taxes under the Senate bill on their income from sales of oil and natural gas abroad.— Beer, wine and liquor producers would reap tax reductions under the Senate measure.— Companies that provide management services like maintenance for aircraft get an updated win. The Senate bill clarifies that under current law, the management companies would be exempt from paying taxes on payments they receive from owners of private jets as well as from commercial airlines. That was a request from Ohio Sens. Rob Portman, a Republican, and Sherrod Brown, a Democrat, whose state is home to NetJets, a big aircraft management company.Portman voted for the overall bill. Brown opposed it.__LOSERS— An estimated 13 million Americans could lose health insurance coverage under the Senate bill, which would repeal the 'Obamacare' requirement that everyone in the U.S. have health insurance. The projection comes from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. Eliminating the fines is expected to mean fewer people would obtain federally subsidized health policies.— People living in high-tax states would be hit by repeal of federal deductions for state and local taxes under the Senate bill, and partial repeal under the House measure. That result of a compromise allows the deduction for up to $10,000 in property taxes.— Many families making less than $30,000 a year would face tax increases starting in 2021 under the Senate bill, according to Congress' nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation. By 2027, families earning less than $75,000 would see their tax bills rise while those making more would enjoy reductions, the analysts find. The individual income-tax reductions in the Senate bill would end in 2026.
  • We have updated information regarding a Tulsa homicide Friday night near East 36th Street and South 137th East Avenue. Police tell us Phazon Scott surrendered to investigators around 9:45 p.m. He will be booked into the Tulsa County Jail for first-degree murder. The unidentified 40-year-old victim was found fatally shot inside a house around 6:37 p.m. “The victim wanted to talk to the grandmother about a situation at the house involving his children,” police said.   “Scott arrived and entered the house and he and the victim had an argument. During the course of the argument Scott pulled a handgun from his waistband and shot the victim.” Scott then left the scene with the gun.  He later returned to the home and surrendered.   
  • KRMG has learned Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed 'most' of the revised budget bill passed by lawmakers this week. In a statement released by her office, Fallin says, “House Bill 1019X does not provide a long-term solution to the re-occurring budget deficits, and within three months we will come back facing an estimated $600 million shortfall.' Fallin vetoed 165 of 170 sections in the bill.  She did leave intact provisions for the Department of Mental Health, the Department of Human Services, Oklahoma Health Care Authority, the Department of Health, and the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Statement from the Tulsa Regional Chamber: “We at the Tulsa Regional Chamber strongly applaud Governor Fallin’s decision to veto much of the revised budget sent to her by the legislature Friday. Her courage in demanding real solutions to our budget crisis – not merely kicking the can down the road – is admirable and necessary. Oklahomans expect elected officials to be responsible stewards of public funds and navigate a sound budget for the state. We support Governor Fallin’s leadership tonight in demanding a higher standard for all Oklahomans.”
  • If you have a kite, today will be perfect to take it out to the park. National Weather Service Meteorologist Bart Haake says it's going to be windy in the Tulsa area. “It looks like we’ll see partly cloudy skies,” Haake said.  “We’ll see breezy northerly winds, probably in the 20 to 30 mile an hour range.” The sun is also expected to make an appearance.  NWS reports the high will only reach around 57 degrees.   There is a wind advisory in effect from 6 a.m. until 5 p.m.   It’s going to get chilly Saturday night.  Temperatures are expected to drop to around 35 degrees.  
  • An Ohio pastor, arrested in Dayton, was found guilty earlier this year for loitering to engage in solicitation, according to court records. >> Read more trending news Daniel P. Williams, 40, of Huber Heights, was found guilty in late August after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor count of loitering, according to Dayton Municipal Court. Williams’ employer is listed as Arrowbrook Baptist Church in Xenia in both court record and the police report. The church’s website also lists Williams as its pastor. Attempts to reach Williams by phone  were unsuccessful. Williams was originally charged with a second count of loitering and a third count of soliciting. Both were withdrawn upon his guilty plea, according to Dayton Municipal Court.  The violation happened at around noon Aug. 17, according to Dayton police. Williams was sentenced to 60 days in jail, with all 60 days suspended. He will be on probation for one year, according to court records.
  • The Oklahoma Senate approved a bill Friday that will cut funding to most state agencies and will spend cash reserves to help plugging the $215 million budget hole. Lawmakers were forced to fix a budget shortfall after they failed to pass a broad package of tax increases. The plan would impose cuts of about 2.5 percent on most agencies to make up for expected revenue lost from an unconstitutional cigarette tax the Legislature approved in May. The rest of would be filled by using one-time money, including savings accounts. Lawmakers returned to the Capitol on Sept. 25 for a special session to fix the budget and find longer-term solutions to chronic shortfalls that have forced deep cuts to agencies and services for three consecutive years.