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    A Navy SEAL who fell to his death when his parachute failed to open during a Fleet Week demonstration over the Hudson River has been identified as a 27-year-old Colorado man. The accident that killed Remington J. Peters occurred Sunday at Liberty State Park, a large New Jersey park across from Manhattan where people catch ferries to see the Statue of Liberty. Peters, whose identity was revealed late Monday, was a member of an elite Navy parachute team called the Leap Frogs. He was a role model who will be 'painfully missed,' his family said in a statement released by the U.S. Navy. 'He was an angel on earth and role model to all,' the statement said. 'We couldn't have been more proud of him. He lived life to the fullest and taught us to do the same.' The cause of the parachute malfunction that killed Peters is under investigation. Peters was among four parachutists who drifted down from two helicopters. The Navy said he was pulled from the water by the U.S. Coast Guard. His parachute landed in a parking lot. The Navy Region Mid-Atlantic commander, Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, asked for prayers 'for the Navy SEAL community.
  • A Memphis family was left in complete disbelief when they visited the grave of their loved one, a 6-month-old who was buried May 20.  The family of Ashton Mackey wanted to spend Memorial Day remembering the child whose life was abruptly ended after becoming extremely ill. >> Read more trending news When they arrived at New Park Cemetery Monday, what the family found was something a parent never wants to see after laying their child to rest.  Ashton's mother, Alicia Mackey, said she found her son's casket floating in water, out of the ground.  “I get (to the cemetery) and (the casket is) floating on top of what he’s supposed to be buried in. I couldn't believe it,' she said.  Related: PHOTOS: Mom heartbroken after finding 6-month-old son's casket floating in water  Mackey said she has no idea how or why the casket ended up above ground. She tried to get answers from the cemetery, but a sign on the front door said they would be closed in observance of the holiday.  “I'm not going to be able to sleep. I already have nightmares. I don't sleep. This is sad. I need to see him back like he was, up under there,” Mackey said.   Nine days ago, the family said their goodbyes when they buried Ashton. On Monday, the family ended up burying him again, taking dry dirt from a nearby field to cover the casket. “I do not want to see this happen to no one else. Not even my enemy,” Mackey said.  The cemetery also could not be reached as it was closed for Memorial Day. Shelby Country Health Department, which is in control of the cemeteries in the area, could not be reached because of the Memorial Day holiday.
  • The box says “It's amazing what she knows,” but security experts say the My Friend Cayla doll also makes it easy for strangers to know your child. The doll uses Bluetooth technology to connect to a device with no PIN or password required.  >> Read more trending news “On a scale of one to 10 this doll was definitely one to hack,” Ken Munro with Pentest Partners, who discovered the vulnerability in 2015, said. “I don't think anybody takes this seriously enough. What bothers me is we're expecting parents to become computer security experts and that's not realistic.” Privacy groups are taking action. Last December the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington filed a complaint with the FTC about Genesis toys, the maker of My Friend Cayla and the robot I-Que. The complaint cites ease of access and how the app recordings were sent to a third party software company, Nuance Communications, without making it clear to parents.  RELATED: Germany bans talking doll due to security concerns The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, or C.O.P.P.A, sets strict guidelines on how parents must be notified about information collected on their children.  “The parent has to actually know what is going on and then say, ‘Yes, I agree.’ The box cannot already be checked. It cannot be just hidden somewhere in the terms of service. It's supposed to be a moment where the parent realizes what's going on and says, ‘Yes, I'm OK with that,’” Munro said. RELATED: Do some toys threaten your child’s privacy? Even if parents are notified, understanding how the information is stored is key.  'It's going to the cloud. That's the basic thing for so many of our devices,' said Munro. Child user profiles and recordings collected by some other companies have also been compromised. In 2015, V-Tech Toys was hacked exposing over six million child profiles. Plus, security researchers recently discovered that people could access voice recordings of Spiral Toys Cloudpets. Munro said that the best way to make sure your children's privacy is secure is to not give out their information in the first place.  “It's really more of a problem of how we as Americans view our privacy, and we keep giving more and more information out,” Munro said. “Eventually, we're not going to have any more privacy if we don't stop.” The FTC would not comment on their investigation of complaints against Genesis Toys and Nuance. 
  • While the calendar says we are days away from the month of June, Republicans in Congress are already feeling pressure over their legislative agenda for 2017, as time is already growing short for GOP efforts to overhaul the Obama health law, which also puts a time squeeze on other major initiatives on Capitol Hill. There are no votes scheduled this week in the Congress; the Senate returns to legislative session on June 5, while the House is back in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Here’s some of what faces Republicans in the Congress: 1. Everything keys off of the GOP health care bill. Because the GOP is trying to use the expedited “budget reconciliation” process, which allows them to avoid a filibuster in the Senate, nothing involved with next year’s budget – or with tax reform – can move until health care is settled. GOP Senators have been meeting regularly in recent weeks to decide what to do on health care – but they don’t have a deal as yet, and no one is quiet sure when they might have a vote. “We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) told reporters this week. “Damned if I know,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said about when a deal might be reached. Writing their own bill takes time. Senate laying groundwork for own health care replacement bill — Rusty Arrison (@RustyArrisonXVJ) May 26, 2017 2. Why do you keep saying there isn’t much time? Two things are at work here – the Congressional calendar, and the limits on the “budget reconciliation” process. The authorization to use reconciliation for a health care bill expires on September 30 – the end of the 2017 Fiscal Year. So, the GOP has four months to figure out a bill, and get it approved and sent to the President. But, lawmakers won’t be here much of that four month period. In fact, between now and the end of the fiscal year – there are 43 scheduled legislative work days in the House, which mirrors the Senate schedule. That’s 43 legislative days in session spread out over 18 weeks. You could always get extra time by scrapping the August recess, or working some weekends. 3. The budget is way behind schedule – more than usual. This past week, President Trump delivered his 2018 budget to the Congress. Normally that is done in February. The House and Senate only started having hearings on spending bills this past week. Lawmakers were supposed to approve the blueprint known as the “budget resolution” by April 15. As of now, that plan doesn’t even exist. Congress is supposed to pass all spending bills by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, but that has not happened since 1996. With the schedule still showing five weeks off during the summer, there is no way that lawmakers are going to meet that spending deadline, which will pave the way for stop gap budgets, and then most likely a year-end omnibus spending deal. Sound familiar? @TheDCVince the congress cannot walk and crew gum at the same time. They haven't begun the FY18 budget.We will get more CRs and then omnibus — Bulldog 6 (@MC22554) May 24, 2017 4. Tax reform still hasn’t taken shape. Despite the Sunday tweet by President Trump about his tax plans, it was obvious in budget hearings last week involving Secretary of Treasury Stephen Mnuchin that a Trump tax plan is not ready to be rolled out any time soon. Remember – all we have right now is a one page document with some bullet points. Even if the White House put out the details this next week, Republicans couldn’t take it up under budget reconciliation rules until they get finished with health care legislation. And, as stated above, the GOP does not seem to be near a deal. Senate Republicans probably cannot let June go by without some kind of agreement on health care. The massive TAX CUTS/REFORM that I have submitted is moving along in the process very well, actually ahead of schedule. Big benefits to all! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 29, 2017 5. You can’t pass bills when you aren’t in DC. Whenever I point out how the Congress is going to be home for an extended break, I always hear from people who say, “If they’re not in DC, they can’t screw things up.” Yes, that’s true. On the other hand, it’s also true that when they aren’t working on Capitol Hill, they can’t pass any bills to fix things, either. And for Republicans right now, if you aren’t at work on the floors of the House and Senate, you aren’t passing any of President Trump’s agenda. Those Republican lawmakers having town hall meetings this week will get a lot of attention. If Republicans in the House and Senate were doing their job, Pres Trump could be returning home to sign laws for taxes, health care, etc. — Pat (@Pat170017001) May 26, 2017 It’s not even the end of May. But time is already running short for Republicans in 2017.
  • A retired New York City firefighter who spent months digging through debris after the Sept. 11 terror attacks, then became a key voice in fighting for health care for first responders while wracked with late-stage cancer himself, has died, the fire department said. Raymond Pfeifer died Sunday after an eight-year fight with the disease, the department said. He was 59. Pfeifer was among those who lobbied fiercely for the renewal of the Zadroga Act, which provides health benefits to first responders who fell ill after the attacks in 2001. He and others, including comedian Jon Stewart, went to Congress to challenge lawmakers to extend health monitoring and treatment for Sept. 11 first responders in 2015. Congress ultimately did reauthorize the program. 'I was just a poster boy,' Pfeifer said when he was honored at New York City Hall in January 2016. But 'we got something done. ... It was hard-fought. We dealt with people that didn't really get it.' Stewart, meanwhile, said he had merely been Pfeifer's 'wingman' on their trips to Washington. Pfeifer served over 27 years in the Fire Department before retiring in 2014, according to a Daily News of New York profile of him the next year. 'It was exciting from day one up to the last day I worked, every single minute,' he told the newspaper. 'I was proud every day to put that uniform on.' 'It was a great way of living,' he said. Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro said Sunday that Pfeifer was 'a true fighter,' from battling blazes to pressing for help for sickened 9/11 first responders.
  •   An investigation is underway into the tragic death of a Navy SEAL in a parachuting accident Sunday during a demonstration for Fleet Week in Jersey City, New Jersey, across the Hudson River from Manhattan. >> Read more trending news The SEAL, part of the Navy’s elite skydiving team, the Leap Frogs, plunged to his death in the river when his chute failed to open, according to a Navy spokesperson. The SEAL was immediately rescued from the water, but later pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center, the Navy said in a statement. The parachutist was not identified pending notification of his family. “Our hearts and prayers go out to his family, and I ask for all your prayers for the Navy SEAL community who lost a true patriot today,” Navy Rear Adm. Jack Scorby said, according to The Associated Press.  The Leap Frogs have numerous performances scheduled throughout the rest of the year, according to their website.
  • Americans marched in Memorial Day parades Monday and came together in solemn ceremonies to pay their respects to those killed in service to the country. Remembrances of fallen military members went from New York City, where Memorial Day fell on the last day of Fleet Week New York, to Los Angeles, where an 8-foot bronze sculpture was being unveiled in honor of the dead. The day also coincided with historical moments — the 100th anniversary of the birth of President John F. Kennedy. A wreath was placed at the gravesite of the 35th U.S. president, buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, alongside hundreds of other veterans. The cemetery also was visited by the current president, Donald Trump, who laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the annual ceremony there. ___ FLEET WEEK In New York City, the military presence had been notable all week, as several thousand sailors, Marines and Coast Guard members were present for Fleet Week New York, ending on the holiday. The ships that brought them were scheduled to leave Tuesday. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio joined active service members and veterans aboard the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, a decommissioned aircraft carrier, for its annual commemoration while Gov. Andrew Cuomo marked the day by taking part in multiple parades. ___ MOTORCYCLE RIDE Thousands of motorcyclists took to the streets of Riverside County, east of Los Angeles, for the annual West Coast Thunder ride. The event honors lost service men and women. Quieter commemorations in California included a cemetery walk and community picnic at the Presidio, a park and former military fort in San Francisco. In Los Angeles, the Enduring Heroes Memorial sculpture was unveiled to show a combat soldier hoisting the American flag, a monument to service members from the Pasadena area killed in Iraq, Afghanistan and while fighting terrorism. ___ REMEMBERING SACRIFICE Arizonans gathered at four veterans cemeteries across the state to honor service members who died in conflicts. The events in Phoenix, Sierra Vista, Marana outside Tucson and at Camp Navajo near Flagstaff drew hundreds of people. Gov. Doug Ducey issued a statement urging Arizonans to pause from holiday celebrations and remember those whose sacrifices made the day possible. 'They answered the call of duty, dedicated themselves to a higher purpose, and, when the time came, gave what Lincoln called their 'last full measure of devotion,'' Ducey said. 'This day is their day, and we are eternally grateful for their sacrifices.
  • Special prosecutor Robert Mueller III has given a heart-warming address to Massachusetts college prep school graduates, several days after his appointment to head an investigation into possible connections between Russia and President Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign. The former FBI director was introduced Monday by his granddaughter before speaking at Tabor Academy, a private school in Marion. She was among the graduates. Mueller said a person is only as good as his word, and he spoke of the importance of serving his country with humility, patience and integrity. He referred to his 'three families,' naming his personal family, the Marines and the FBI. Mueller served as FBI director under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. The news media weren't allowed into the ceremony. It was livestreamed on NECN.
  • It could have been a scene out of the movie “Jaws.” In a stunning move, a nine-foot great white shark leaped out of the water and dove onto a fishing boat off the coast of New South Wales, injuring a 73-year-old fisherman. In 60 years of fishing, Terry Selwood told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation he’s never seen anything like it. >> Read more trending news “I caught a blur of something coming over the boat … and the pectoral fin of the shark hit me on the forearm and knocked me down on the ground to my hands and knees,” Selwood told the ABC. “He came right over the top of the motor and then dropped onto the floor,” he said. “There I was on all fours and he’s looking at me and I’m looking at him and then he started to do the dance around and shake and I couldn’t get out quick enough,” Selwood added. >> Related: Teen recovering from terrifying shark attack in Gulf of Mexico The Marine Rescue Unit came to his aid, transporting him to shore where he was taken to a local hospital for treatment of his injury. Selwood said conditions were clear at the time of the breach, with nothing unusual happening in the water around his boat. >> Related: 25 great white sharks close California beaches, force swimmers ashore “For some unknown reason he just launched himself out of the water and must have come up four feet out of the water to clear my outboard motor and drop straight in the boat.” The shark was hauled off by researchers for a necropsy. As for Selwood, he told the ABC he’ll be out fishing again as soon as possible.  
  • It has been nearly 4½ years since Matthew Fenner said he was beaten in a church sanctuary by a group of congregants hell-bent on expelling his 'homosexual demons.' After countless twists and turns, the long-delayed, high-profile case finally appears ready to move forward in North Carolina Superior Court. Jury selection could begin Tuesday for the first of five Word of Faith Fellowship members charged in the attack. Each defendant will be tried separately. The first defendant, longtime minister Brooke Covington, 58, has pleaded innocent to one count each of kidnapping and assault. If convicted, she faces up to two years in prison. The 23-year-old Fenner is bracing himself. 'I'm going to have to relive that night again,' said Fenner, who spent two years pressuring authorities to investigate the allegations against the powerful 750-member evangelical church in Spindale, North Carolina. Ex-members say church leaders believe that possessed congregants must have devils beaten or screamed out of them. Fenner joined the sect with his mother and brother in 2010. He fled after he said he was attacked on Jan. 27, 2013, but his family members are still inside. 'You can't imagine the emotional toll this has taken on my life. I had to put a lot of things on hold because of this. ... I can't do anything until this is over,' said Fenner, who graduated from college last year and is planning to go to medical school. Fenner also is preparing for the possibility of more disappointment. There's a chance the trial could be delayed again. The defense has filed motions to move the trial out of Rutherford County, located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains midway between Charlotte and Asheville, due to years of negative publicity about the church's practices. In the alternative, the defense wants a jury brought in from another area, called a change of venire. The prosecution has argued that the usual procedure is to try to select a jury in the county where a crime was committed before deciding to move a trial or to bring in an outside jury. If both motions are denied, or if the judge decides to try seating a jury before making a decision, the trial could begin Tuesday. But if the judge grants either of the motions, the trial would likely be delayed again. Over the last few years, there have been numerous delays. At first, the five defendants were represented by the same attorneys — all members of Word of Faith Fellowship. Assistant Prosecutor Garland Byers Jr. filed a motion in 2015 to disqualify the law firm, citing conflicts of interest. A judge agreed, but the church appealed. A year later, though, the church attorneys withdrew the appeal, and each defendant got their own new attorney. In addition, one of the defendants, Sarah Anderson, left the church in 2015, saying her 1-year-old son was being abused. It's unclear whether she will testify at Covington's trial and if she does, what she will say. Fenner said he was leaving a prayer service Jan. 27, 2013, when nearly two dozen people surrounded him in the sanctuary. He said they slapped, punched, choked and blasted him — a church practice that involves intense screaming — him for two hours as they tried to expel his 'homosexual demons.' As part of an ongoing, two-year investigation into abuse of Word of Faith Fellowship congregants by church leaders, The Associated Press interviewed four former church members who said they witnessed the Fenner assault. 'They just kept hitting him over and over. It was horrible. ... I thought that (Fenner) was going to be the first person they killed,' said ex-congregant Danielle Cordes. Said another former member, Andre Oliveira: 'I saw them throw him around, pin him on the floor. They were screaming at him, hitting him over and over. It just made me sick.' Based on exclusive interviews with 43 former members, documents and secretly made recordings, the AP reported in February that Word of Faith Fellowship congregants were regularly punched, smacked, choked, slammed to the floor or thrown through walls in a violent form of deliverance meant to 'purify' sinners by beating out devils. The AP also previously revealed that congregants were ordered by church leaders to lie to authorities investigating reports of abuse and that two assistant district attorneys and a veteran social worker were among those who coached congregants and their children on what to say to investigators. After the AP report, the prosecutors, including one who is a son-in-law of a church founder, left their jobs, and the social worker resigned. The sect was founded in 1979 by Jane Whaley, a petite former math teacher, and her husband, Sam, a former used car salesman. Under Jane Whaley's leadership, Word of Faith Fellowship grew from a handful of followers to its current congregation in North Carolina, and another nearly 2,000 members in churches in Brazil and Ghana and affiliations in other countries. ___ Mohr reported from Jackson, Mississippi
  • While the calendar says we are days away from the month of June, Republicans in Congress are already feeling pressure over their legislative agenda for 2017, as time is already growing short for GOP efforts to overhaul the Obama health law, which also puts a time squeeze on other major initiatives on Capitol Hill. There are no votes scheduled this week in the Congress; the Senate returns to legislative session on June 5, while the House is back in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Here’s some of what faces Republicans in the Congress: 1. Everything keys off of the GOP health care bill. Because the GOP is trying to use the expedited “budget reconciliation” process, which allows them to avoid a filibuster in the Senate, nothing involved with next year’s budget – or with tax reform – can move until health care is settled. GOP Senators have been meeting regularly in recent weeks to decide what to do on health care – but they don’t have a deal as yet, and no one is quiet sure when they might have a vote. “We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) told reporters this week. “Damned if I know,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said about when a deal might be reached. Writing their own bill takes time. Senate laying groundwork for own health care replacement bill — Rusty Arrison (@RustyArrisonXVJ) May 26, 2017 2. Why do you keep saying there isn’t much time? Two things are at work here – the Congressional calendar, and the limits on the “budget reconciliation” process. The authorization to use reconciliation for a health care bill expires on September 30 – the end of the 2017 Fiscal Year. So, the GOP has four months to figure out a bill, and get it approved and sent to the President. But, lawmakers won’t be here much of that four month period. In fact, between now and the end of the fiscal year – there are 43 scheduled legislative work days in the House, which mirrors the Senate schedule. That’s 43 legislative days in session spread out over 18 weeks. You could always get extra time by scrapping the August recess, or working some weekends. 3. The budget is way behind schedule – more than usual. This past week, President Trump delivered his 2018 budget to the Congress. Normally that is done in February. The House and Senate only started having hearings on spending bills this past week. Lawmakers were supposed to approve the blueprint known as the “budget resolution” by April 15. As of now, that plan doesn’t even exist. Congress is supposed to pass all spending bills by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, but that has not happened since 1996. With the schedule still showing five weeks off during the summer, there is no way that lawmakers are going to meet that spending deadline, which will pave the way for stop gap budgets, and then most likely a year-end omnibus spending deal. Sound familiar? @TheDCVince the congress cannot walk and crew gum at the same time. They haven't begun the FY18 budget.We will get more CRs and then omnibus — Bulldog 6 (@MC22554) May 24, 2017 4. Tax reform still hasn’t taken shape. Despite the Sunday tweet by President Trump about his tax plans, it was obvious in budget hearings last week involving Secretary of Treasury Stephen Mnuchin that a Trump tax plan is not ready to be rolled out any time soon. Remember – all we have right now is a one page document with some bullet points. Even if the White House put out the details this next week, Republicans couldn’t take it up under budget reconciliation rules until they get finished with health care legislation. And, as stated above, the GOP does not seem to be near a deal. Senate Republicans probably cannot let June go by without some kind of agreement on health care. The massive TAX CUTS/REFORM that I have submitted is moving along in the process very well, actually ahead of schedule. Big benefits to all! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 29, 2017 5. You can’t pass bills when you aren’t in DC. Whenever I point out how the Congress is going to be home for an extended break, I always hear from people who say, “If they’re not in DC, they can’t screw things up.” Yes, that’s true. On the other hand, it’s also true that when they aren’t working on Capitol Hill, they can’t pass any bills to fix things, either. And for Republicans right now, if you aren’t at work on the floors of the House and Senate, you aren’t passing any of President Trump’s agenda. Those Republican lawmakers having town hall meetings this week will get a lot of attention. If Republicans in the House and Senate were doing their job, Pres Trump could be returning home to sign laws for taxes, health care, etc. — Pat (@Pat170017001) May 26, 2017 It’s not even the end of May. But time is already running short for Republicans in 2017.
  • A soldier from Illinois was able to spend the Memorial Day weekend with his family in Missouri all thanks to the kindness of a stranger he met at a Dallas airport. U.S. Army mechanic Keaton Tilson, who is stationed at Fort Hood, was stuck at an airport for two days, trying to get a flight on standby, KTVI reported. But Josh Rainey from Glendale, Missouri, wasn’t having any of it.  >> Read more trending news  At first Rainey tried to give Tilson his ticket, but airline regulations wouldn’t allow the transfer, so Rainey decided on the next option, buying a last-minute ticket for Tilson to St. Louis so he can be with family over the holiday weekend. Rainey told KTVI that the he spent $341 on the ticket and that the fact that Tilson was able to get home was worth more than the money. “He walked away and came back and asked if he could hug me, and I think we both had to fight back the tears after that,” Rainey said.
  • Being the U-S Defense Secretary is a tough job, but Marine General James Mattis certainly sounds up to the task. He lit the social media world on fire after he was asked on CBS's Face the Nation what keeps him awake at night. He answered, 'Nothing, I keep other people awake at night.' While that quote has gotten the most attentions, the interview covered a wide range of important topics. He says President Trump standing alongside fellow NATO leaders last week shows he supports NATO. He says war with North Korea would be catastrophic. And he says he was humbled the commitment made by the younger generation of military personnel to carry out decisions made by leaders like himself.
  • Clear water laps at the white sand along crescent-shaped Siesta Beach, helping the Florida shore rank as the best in the country, according to a coastal expert. Dr. Stephan P. Leatherman, known as “Dr. Beach,” released his list of the 2017 best beaches Thursday.  Water and sand quality, as well as environmental management and beach safety efforts, are some of the 50 criteria Leatherman uses to develop the rankings. Here is the Top Ten:
  • For Memorial Day, it was the perfect sign of respect. The photo of a sandwich board outside Mayberry’s Bar & Grill in the northern Kansas city of Washington that pays tribute to the American servicemen who have lost their lives fighting for their country has gone viral.  >> Read more trending news  “We have 619,300 reasons to be closed on Monday,” is written in chalk on the sign, referring to U.S. service deaths from World War I, World War II and the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. The sign was the idea of Mayberry’s employee Kelly Ray, the Wichita Eagle reported. Ray moved from Missouri to northern Kansas earlier this year, and he brought a sign he made while working at a previous restaurant. Mayberry’s would be closed on Sunday and on Memorial Day, but the sign posted outside the restaurant would be photographed and shared across social media. By late Sunday it had been shared more than 109,000 times. “I just love the message,” Ray told the Wichita Eagle on Sunday. “You don’t have to like our president or like some of the things our government is doing, but you sure better respect those who have laid down their lives for us to be able to live here.” According to official U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs numbers, and depending on how deaths are calculated, the sign totals are not completely accurate, but the message is still relevant. Ray told KWCH that many patrons have thanked him for putting up the sign. One veteran thanked him in person, but Ray, who is the restaurant’s manager and chef, stopped him. “I said, ‘No, thank you,’” Ray told KWCH. “You guys are the reason we’re here and we appreciate that. “He said ‘Damn shame more people don’t think like that,’” Ray said. Ray said the idea for the sign was formed when he worked at a Missouri restaurant. “I mentioned to the owner that we should be closed for Memorial Day, and he said, ‘I can’t think of one good reason why we would do that, because people are going to be out and they’ll want to eat,’ ” Ray told the Wichita Eagle. “I saw a post on Facebook with the number of people who have died in our wars, so I basically just put that on a sign and showed it to him.” The owner closed the restaurant. “People talk about Memorial Day being the start of summer and that sort of thing,” Ray told the newspaper. “But what it’s really about is those people who died. I hope people think about them.”