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National News

    A spy satellite for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office has been launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket carrying the classified NROL-42 satellite lifted off at 10:49 p.m. PDT Saturday. All systems were going well when the launch webcast concluded about three minutes into the flight. The launch was expected to be visible across a wide area of California, weather permitting. National Reconnaissance Office satellites gather intelligence information for U.S. national security and an array of other purposes including assessing impacts of natural disasters. U.S. officials have not revealed what the spacecraft will be doing or what its orbit will be. United Launch Alliance is a joint venture of Lockheed Martin and Boeing.
  • Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas, has just added to a handful of its labor and delivery rooms something you might think of as only being used at the dentist’s office: nitrous oxide aka laughing gas. Why? Moms in labor in Europe have been using laughing gas for decades, and it’s recently gaining favor in the U.S., especially in California. Natural birthing centers like Austin Area Birthing Center and Natural Beginning Birth Center in Texas have been offering nitrous oxide to their patients, as well. The hospitals are starting to catch up. Laughing gas doesn’t have some of the side effects (the loopiness and loss of control) that narcotics like Demerol or other pain medications have, and it doesn’t affect the baby’s heart rate. The only thing that could happen is nausea or vomiting for the mom, but that’s rare. It’s also short-acting. A mom can put the laughing gas mask to her face just before a contraction starts or during a contraction and then remove the mask after it’s passed. She will only feel the effects of the gas when she’s breathing it in. >> Read more trending news She can’t overdose either, because she’s the one holding the mask to her face. If she got too much, she wouldn’t be able to continue to hold the mask to her face because she would be asleep. If you’ve had laughing gas in the dentist office and didn’t like how you felt, this is a different formula. It’s a 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen for moms in labor. For people in the dentist office, it’s a 70 percent nitrogen 30 percent oxygen formula. It actually doesn’t stop the mom from feeling the labor pain. She just doesn’t care about the pain, says Dr. Sally Grogono, an obstetrician at Seton Medical Center. “I think it’s amazing,” says Grogono, who helped encourage Seton to add the nitrous oxide hookups in the rooms. “A lot of our natural labor moms just need something little to take the edge off,” she says. Sometimes women can stall out in labor because they are tensing because of the pain. This would help them not do that. “Childbirth is very anxiety producing for all the patients,” Grogono says. Because they control when and how often they are getting the gas, they have more control over the pain. They usually only use it at the height of labor but don’t need it during the pushing stage. The only women who should not use it are people with multiple sclerosis or a severe B-12 deficiency. Since Seton began offering it two weeks ago, Grogono has heard good reports from the labor and delivery nurses. She’s now educating her patients that it’s an option for them. They would just have to request that they be put in a room that has it. “It’s not going to work for everybody, but it’s a great tool for our patients,” Grogono says.
  • The baby girl born to a mother who gave up cancer treatment to save her has died, the family announced in a Facebook post. Life Lynn DeKlyen was born on Sept. 6 at 24 weeks in Ann Arbor, Michigan, weighing just 1 pound, 7 ounces. Her family said in a Facebook post they are shattered over the loss. >> On HotTopics.TV: Mom who gave up cancer treatment to save unborn baby dies after giving birth  Life Lynn’s mother, Carrie, was diagnosed with glioblastoma in April but decided to forgo treatment to save her baby. Shortly after delivering Life via cesarean section, doctors took Carrie off life support. Carrie died a few days later. She and her husband, Nick DeKlyen, had six children. >> Read more trending news “Carrie is now rocking her baby girl,” the family wrote in a post on the Cure 4 Carrie page announcing Life Lynn’s passing. “I have no explanation of why this happened, but I do know Jesus loves us, and someday we will know why. The grief we feel is almost unbearable, please be praying for our family.” The family said Life Lynn will be buried with her mother. The family has set up a GoFundMe page to raise money for medical expenses. If you would like to donate, click here.
  • A police officer who fathered a child with a 15-year-old girl was suspended without pay and charged with aggravated sexual assault, according to the Camden County Prosecutor. >> Read more trending news Det. Rafael Martinez, 32, had sex on multiple occasions with the girl from September 2016 through Aug. 18, according to The Star-Ledger. Martinez admitted he was the father and signed the baby’s birth certificate when the child was born in mid-August, according to the Ledger. A DNA test confirmed he is the father, according to the Ledger. Martinez, who had worked four and a half years with the Camden County Police, was charged with aggravated sexal assault and endangering the welfare of a child. He could face up to 15 years in jail.
  • President Donald Trump denounced protests by NFL players and rescinded a White House invitation for NBA champion Stephen Curry in a two-day rant that targeted top professional athletes and brought swift condemnation Saturday from league executives and star players alike. Wading into thorny issues of race and politics, Trump's comments in a Friday night speech and a series of Saturday tweets drew sharp responses from some of the nation's top athletes, with LeBron James calling the president a 'bum.' Hours later, Major League Baseball saw its first player take a knee during the national anthem. Trump started by announcing that Curry, the popular two-time MVP for the Golden State Warriors, would not be welcome at the White House for the commemorative visit traditionally made by championship teams: 'Going to the White House is considered a great honor for a championship team. Stephen Curry is hesitating, therefore invitation is withdrawn!' Later, Trump reiterated what he said at a rally in Alabama the previous night — that NFL players who kneel for the national anthem should be fired, and called on NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to tell them to stand. Goodell and several team owners criticized the comments. The Warriors said it was clear they were not welcome at the White House. Curry had said he did not want to go anyway, but the Warriors had not made a collective decision before Saturday — and had planned to discuss it in the morning before the president's tweet, to which coach Steve Kerr said : 'Not surprised. He was going to break up with us before we could break up with him.' Others had far stronger reactions. 'U bum @StephenCurry30 already said he ain't going!' James tweeted in a clear message to the president — a post that Twitter officials said was quickly shared many more times than any other he's sent. 'So therefore ain't no invite. Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up!' Curry appreciated James' strong stance. 'That's a pretty strong statement,' Curry said. 'I think it's bold, it's courageous for any guy to speak up, let alone a guy that has as much to lose as LeBron does and other notable figures in the league. We all have to kind of stand as one the best we can.' Curry added that he doesn't believe Trump 'respects the majority of Americans in this country.' James also released a video Saturday, saying Trump has tried to divide the country. 'He's now using sports as the platform to try to divide us,' James said. 'We all know how much sports brings us together. ... It's not something I can be quiet about.' Warriors general manager Bob Myers said he was surprised by the invitation being pulled, and NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said he was disappointed that the Warriors won't be at the White House. 'The White House visit should be something that is celebrated,' Myers said. 'So we want to go to Washington, D.C., and do something to commemorate kind of who we are as an organization, what we feel, what we represent and at the same time spend our energy on that. Instead of looking backward, we want to look forward.' Added Kerr after his team's first practice of the season, 'These are not normal times.' Bruce Maxwell, an African-American player for the Oakland Athletics, became the first major league baseball player to kneel during the national anthem. Teammate Mark Canha, who is white, put his right hand on one of Maxwell's shoulders during Saturday night's anthem. The Athletics released a statement saying they 'respect and support all of our players' constitutional rights and freedom of expression.' In New York City's Central Park, musician Stevie Wonder declared, 'Tonight, I take a knee for America. Both knees!' as he knelt on stage at the Global Citizen Festival. As a candidate and as president, Trump's approach has at times seemed to inflame racial tensions in a deeply divided country while emboldening groups long in the shadows. Little more than a month ago, Trump came under fire for his response to a white supremacists' protest in Charlottesville, Virginia. Trump also pardoned Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Arizona's Maricopa County, who had been found guilty of defying a judge's order to stop racially profiling Latinos. Trump's latest entry into the intersection of sports and politics started in Alabama on Friday night, when he said NFL players who refused to stand for 'The Star-Spangled Banner' are exhibiting a 'total disrespect of our heritage.' Several NFL players, starting last season with then-San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick, have either knelt, sat or raised fists during the anthem to protest police treatment of blacks and social injustice. Last week at NFL games, four players sat or knelt during the anthem, and two raised fists while others stood by the protesters in support. 'That's a total disrespect of everything that we stand for,' Trump said, encouraging owners to act. He added, 'Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you'd say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He's fired.' On Saturday, Trump echoed his stance. 'If a player wants the privilege of making millions of dollars in the NFL, or other leagues, he or she should not be allowed to disrespect our Great American Flag (or Country) and should stand for the National Anthem,' Trump tweeted. 'If not, YOU'RE FIRED. Find something else to do!' There are 14 NFL games Sunday, including one in London. And how players act during the anthem will certainly be closely watched at each of those games. 'You have a chance to do something really great,' music mogul Sean 'Diddy' Combs told players in a tweet. Tampa Bay receiver Desean Jackson, whose team plays at Minnesota, tweeted: 'I definitely will be making a statement no disrespect to our military of service But we have to stick together as people !! Unity.' Trump has enjoyed strong support from NFL owners, with at least seven of them donating $1 million each to Trump's inaugural committee. They include New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft, whom Trump considers a friend. Goodell strongly backed the players and criticized Trump for 'an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL' while several team owners issued similar statements. New York Giants owners John Mara and Steve Tisch said the comments were inappropriate and offensive. Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, who has supported the players who have knelt, said the country 'needs unifying leadership right now, not more divisiveness,' and San Francisco 49ers CEO Jed York ripped Trump's comments as 'callous.' Hours after Goodell's comments, Trump said the commissioner had 'put out a statement trying to justify the total disrespect certain players show to our country. Tell them to stand!' Terry and Kim Pegula, the owners of the Buffalo Bills, said a number of players attended a voluntary meeting with team executives, including general manager Brandon Beane, coach Sean McDermott and members of his staff. 'President Trump's remarks were divisive and disrespectful to the entire NFL community but we tried to use them as an opportunity to further unify our team and our organization,' the Pegulas said. 'Our players have the freedom to express themselves in respectful and thoughtful manner and we all agreed that our sole message is to provide and to promote an environment that is focused on love and equality.' Plenty of other current and former stars from across sports weighed in Saturday, as did the National Basketball Players Association, which defended its members' 'free speech rights' against those seeking to 'stifle' them. Trump also bemoaned what he called a decline in violence in football, noting that it's 'not the same game' because players are now either penalized or thrown out of games for aggressive tackles. 'No man or woman should ever have to choose a job that forces them to surrender their rights,' said DeMaurice Smith, the NFL Players Association executive director. 'No worker nor any athlete, professional or not, should be forced to become less than human when it comes to protecting their basic health and safety.' Trump has met with some championship teams already in his first year in office. Clemson visited the White House this year after winning the College Football Playoff, some members of the New England Patriots went after the Super Bowl victory and the Chicago Cubs went to the Oval Office in June to commemorate their World Series title. The Cubs also had the larger and more traditional visit with President Barack Obama in January, four days before the Trump inauguration. North Carolina, the reigning NCAA men's basketball champion, said Saturday it will not visit the White House this season. The Tar Heels cited scheduling conflicts. Warriors forward Draymond Green said the good news was that Golden State won't have to talk about going to the White House again — unless they win another title during the Trump presidency. 'Michelle Obama said it best,' Green said. 'She said it best. They go low. We go high. He beat us to the punch. Happy the game is over.' ___ Reynolds reported from Miami. AP Sports Writers Janie McCauley and John Wawrow and AP writer Corey Williams in Detroit contributed to this story.
  • Bruce Maxwell faced the flag, put his hand over his heart and took a knee when the national anthem began to play. >> Read more trending news Maxwell, the Oakland A’s rookie catcher, became the first Major League Baseball player to kneel before a game, doing so Saturday in the wake of President Donald Trump’s comments about players peacefully protesting during games.  “Don't be surprised if you start seeing athletes kneeling in other sports now,” Maxwell tweeted, foreshadowing his own actions. “Comments like that coming from our president. WOW! Inequality is being displayed bigger than ever right now as our president shows that freedom of protest and speech is not allowed. This now has gone from just a Black Lives Matter topic to just complete inequality of any man or woman that wants to stand for their rights.” Maxwell was hit with a foul ball Wednesday and was not in the lineup Saturday because of the league’s concussion protocol. The team said it supports Maxwell’s decision. 'The Oakland A's pride ourselves on being inclusive,” the team said on Twitter. “We respect and support all our players' constitutional rights and freedom of expression.” Maxwell, the son of a military family, took to social media earlier in the day after Trump’s comments that NFL players who kneel in protest should be off the field and fired. Trump also took aim at the NBA when he rescinded an invitation to the White House to Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry and the team for winning the league’s championship. Maxwell, who is black, was born in Wiedbaden, Germany, when his father was stationed there with the Army. Maxwell started his protest in opposition to Trump and to show solidarity with NFL players who have taken a knee during the national anthem. “Bruce has made it clear that he is taking a stand about what he perceives as racial injustices in this country, and his personal disappointment with President Trump's response to a number of professional athletes' totally peaceful, non-violent protests,” Matt Sosnick, Maxwell’s agent, told the San Francisco Chronicle. “Bruce has shared with both me and his teammates that his feelings have nothing to do with a lack of patriotism or a hatred of any man, but rather everything to do with equality for men, women and children regardless of race or religion.”
  • President Donald Trump on Saturday pointed to a reported missile test by Iran to renew his criticism of the nuclear agreement it reached with the U.S. and other nations. Iran's Revolutionary Guard on Friday displayed its latest ballistic missile capable of reaching Israel and much of the Middle East. The U.S. opposes Iran's ballistic missile program and Trump signed a bill last month imposing penalties on those involved with it. Video of the test firing of a Khoramshahr medium-range ballistic missile aired Friday on Iran's state TV. The time or location of the test was not mentioned in the report. Trump tweeted Saturday about the public unveiling of the missile: 'Iran just test-fired a Ballistic Missile capable of reaching Israel. They are also working with North Korea. Not much of an agreement we have!' The nuclear agreement reached during the Obama administration doesn't strictly prohibit Iran from developing missiles. Trump has suggested he might seek to renegotiate the nuclear deal or abandon it. He told the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday that the accord was 'nothing short of an embarrassment' and the 'worst one-sided deal perhaps in American history.' Officials have said Trump might use the Oct. 15 deadline for certifying to Congress whether Iran is in compliance with the nuclear deal to either declare Iran in violation or determine that the agreement is no longer in the national security interest of the U.S. The tweet was one of several issued by Trump on Saturday covering a range of topics: athletes' protesting at football games, Sen. John McCain's decision not to support the GOP health care bill, NBA star Stephen Curry and an event at the White House, Trump's support of Sen. Luther Strange in Alabama's GOP Senate runoff, and his pride in first lady Melania Trump representing the U.S. in Toronto.
  • Palm Beach County Animal Care and Control took away Joseph Licata’s three dogs two weeks ago, alleging he abandoned them with Hurricane Irma approaching. Licata, desperate to get his dogs back, argues he didn’t abandon them. Rather, he was on vacation in London, a trip he planned for a year, and enlisted a friend to give them food and water and take them inside if the storm got close. >> Read more trending news “I did make a stupid mistake,” he conceded: He parked his car in front of the door to protect the house, not realizing it was too close for the caretaker to let the dogs in. He also gave her the wrong key, so even without the car she wouldn’t have been able to bring in the dogs, which usually live outside in his yard. She was there before the storm when, alerted by a neighbor, Animal Care and Control took Pretty the Chihuahua mix, Carla the boxer mix and Rusty the Malinois mix after seeing the caretaker had no way to get into the house. Licata hasn’t seen his pets since his return. They’re “kind of like a small, medium and large,” as he describes the dogs, which he got from a shelter 12 years ago. “We love them dearly,” he said. “They’re about 15 years old. They’re like kids for me.” Animal Care and Control sees it differently. They’re dealing with dozens of pets abandoned during the hurricane. The agency and the nearby Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League have so many homeless pets on hand, they’re waiving all pet adoption fees through Oct. 14. In Licata’s case, meanwhile, “there’s a criminal investigation and his scenario is, he is very likely to face criminal charges,” David Walesky, operations manager for the county agency said Friday. “He evacuated the country and left three geriatric dogs in his yard. The caretaker had no means to put the animals away during the winds.” Licata faces civil and criminal actions, Walesky said. Within 30 days there’ll be a civil hearing in which a judge will decide whether Licata can get his dogs back. Even if he does, he still could be hit with criminal charges. Licata said he’s beside himself. “I haven’t been able to eat or sleep,” he said. He’s grateful the agency took the dogs in to protect them, given the circumstances, but he can’t understand why they’re accusing him of abandonment. He works for the U.S. Postal Service, where employees pick their vacation days far in advance, last November in his case. He bought his plane tickets and arranged for a longtime friend to look after the dogs. He didn’t get the agency’s phone message right away because he didn’t have service in England. When he finally got through and said he would pick up the dogs Friday, Sept. 15, “some lady there said, ‘To pick up your dogs you have to speak to an officer, because they were picked up under suspicious circumstances.’” He went in, told them his story. They wouldn’t let him see the dogs. “They looked at me and they were very cold, very unconcerned. One of the officers said, ‘So you’re admitting that you blocked the door.’ I said, ‘Not deliberately.’ I said, ‘I admit I made a mistake and didn’t leave enough room to let them in.’” “They said, ‘We’re going to go for custody of your dogs…. Conversation’s over.” “The moral of the story is, they’re 15 years old and they want custody of them. What does that mean? They’re going to try to have somebody adopt them? Nobody’s going to adopt them. They’re going to be destroyed. I don’t know what they’re accomplishing. Now they’re pent up in a little cage, when they’re used to being free. They haven’t seen me in three weeks.” But the officials told him that if an owner leaves the premises without taking the dogs, that’s abandonment, Licata said. He argued that, if he had children and left them with a babysitter, that would be abandonment? “They don’t deserve to be destroyed and I don’t deserve to be tortured like this,” he said. “Not for an accidental thing I did wrong.”
  • Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said Saturday he will stop flying private planes on official business while an internal review of the flights is being done and that he welcomes the review. Price defended the practice of using private planes on Fox News. A spokeswoman has said Price tries to fly commercial whenever possible. The HHS inspector general's office says the agency is reviewing Price's charter flights to see if they violated government travel regulations. Price, a former Republican House member from Georgia, chartered flights to a resort in Maine where he was part of a discussion with a health care industry CEO. That was according to a report in Politico. He also chartered flights to community health centers in New Hampshire and Pennsylvania. Price said all the flights were work-related and used for official business, including for trips related to the opioid crisis or the recent hurricanes. 'But we've heard the criticism,' Price said. 'We've heard the concerns. And we take that very seriously and have taken it to heart.' Congressional Democrats last week chastised Price, saying he wasted taxpayer money by chartering five private flights last week for official business when cheaper travel options were available. To Democrats, Price's expensive travel smacked of hypocrisy given President Donald Trump's campaign pledge to 'drain the swamp' of money and influence in Washington and Price's long-standing criticism of government waste.
  • President Donald Trump's former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, is planning to campaign against the Trump-backed candidate in Alabama's Republican Senate primary runoff. The campaign of former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore confirms that Bannon will speak Monday at a rally along with 'Duck Dynasty' star Phil Robertson. The runoff is Tuesday. Trump is backing the incumbent, Sen. Luther Strange. On Friday night, the president himself spoke at a rally urging Republicans to vote for Strange. Vice President Mike Pence is set to visit the state Monday. Moore has forced Strange into a tight race for the nomination. Strange was appointed to the seat that belonged to Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Moore has garnered backing of a number of anti-establishment forces, including Bannon and a pro-Trump super PAC, Great America Alliance.
  • Witnesses spotted children driving a vehicle in Sand Springs recently with an adult woman in the backseat. Police say three children, ages 10, 11 and 12, took turns because 34-year-old Nicole Ann Hall was in no condition to drive. “She had these children blow into the interlock device to get the car started,” police said.  “It’s shocking.  The interlock device is put on cars to protect the public.” The children were not good drivers either.  Witnesses report they ran stop signs, hit curbs, and nearly hit a car head-on.   Hall now faces three counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor, public intoxication, and obstructing a police officer.
  • Summer isn't done with the Tulsa area just yet. National Weather Service Meteorologist Craig Sullivan says we have another hot day ahead of us on Saturday. “The hot weather is going to continue through the weekend,” Sullivan said.  “We’re looking at highs this afternoon in the lower 90s in Tulsa.” NWS reports the low Saturday night will be around 71 degrees. Conditions will remain the same on Sunday.  Expect to see sunny skies, with a high near 92 degrees.  
  • With Friday’s decision by Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) to oppose a last-ditch GOP proposal to overhaul the Obama health law, Republicans have almost run out of time to make substantive changes to Obamacare by a September 30 deadline for action under a special expedited procedure that did not allow for a Senate filibuster, again dealing the President and GOP leaders a bitter defeat on an issue they’ve campaigned on for the last seven years. Here’s what can still happen over the next week – and in coming months on Capitol Hill. 1. There could still be a vote on Graham-Cassidy. While Sen. McCain has made clear that he won’t vote for the plan from Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), it’s possible that the Senate could still go on the record on the matter. Aides to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said earlier this week that he planned to force a vote, and that could still happen, to clearly show who was for the plan, and who was not. But for now, it seems like the GOP will fail to get anything done on this signature campaign issue, with McCain, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) definitely against the plan – and two others, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) leaning against. I cannot in good conscience vote for Graham-Cassidy. A bill impacting so many lives deserves a bipartisan approach. https://t.co/2sDjhw6Era pic.twitter.com/30OWezQpLg — John McCain (@SenJohnMcCain) September 22, 2017 2. It could re-start bipartisan health talks. Up until last week, when GOP interest suddenly surged in the Graham-Cassidy plan, there had been increasing efforts to find some kind of agreement between Senators in both parties on ways to make some short term improvements in the Obama health care system for those in the individual and non-group insurance market. Those efforts were put on the shelf in recent days, but now this development leaves an opening for Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA). I'm proud of you, John. It's time for the resumption of the bipartisan Alexander/Murray plan, and I'm ready to help however I can. https://t.co/xu2e3higf3 — John Kasich (@JohnKasich) September 22, 2017 3. GOP health care efforts are certainly not dead. Just because the Graham-Cassidy plan has seemingly fallen short, that doesn’t mean Republicans will give up on their plans to change the Obama health law. For the next fiscal year, the GOP wants to use the budget reconciliation process to pass something on tax cuts and tax reform. Well – there is no reason that they can’t also try to add a health care bill onto that measure as well. One Senate official told me exactly that a few weeks ago. So, this battle is not over. But waiting to do health care on next budget reconciliation bill would give CBO time to fully analyze #GrahamCassidy's impact — Manu Raju (@mkraju) September 22, 2017 4. Republicans just weren’t ready for this process. Maybe the biggest lesson from the after-action report on GOP health care bills over the last nine months is a simple one – Republicans were not ready with their own plan to replace the Obama health law, even though they had been talking about this for seven straight years. Ever since the law was signed by President Obama, Republicans had promised to repeal it, and do something different. As a slogan it sounded great – but as we saw in recent weeks, getting the exact details was something different. The GOP has had 7+ years to come up with a healthcare bill. They've also had a full majority for 8 months. And still nothing. Embarrassing! — Mitch Drabenstott (@mitchdwx) September 22, 2017 5. Democrats have also had 7 years to make improvements. Just as the GOP failed in rallying around a single plan, Democrats also didn’t exactly ring the bell in recent years on how best to improve the Obamacare system. Yes, they admit, things aren’t working perfectly, but they certainly haven’t been talking about what exactly should change, or might be changed. Could we see something different now that Graham-Cassidy seems to be dead? Or will Democrats still just sort of circle the wagons to protect President Obama’s top legislative accomplishment? This is the time for bipartisan action – but that’s easier said than done. McCain's advice for Congress: Republicans and Democrats must work together to improve health care. — Cary Weldy (@caryweldy) September 22, 2017
  • Former Heisman Trophy winner Ricky Williams was arrested in Texas on Tuesday on traffic warrants, records show. >> Read more trending news  Williams was pulled over for a traffic offense, then arrested on warrants, Austin police said. He is no longer in the Travis County Jail, records show.  Williams, who starred at the University of Texas and played seven seasons in the NFL, is currently a football analyst for ESPN's Longhorn Network. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1998 and was the second Longhorn to win college football’s top prize, and was also a two-time All-American. Earlier this year, Williams said he was racially profiled while walking through a neighborhood in Tyler. A man called 911 when he 'observed a black male, wearing all black, crouched down behind his wire fence,' and Tyler police stopped and searched Williams, according to media reports.  Williams was taken to the Travis County Jail 17 years ago, when he was playing for the New Orleans Saints, when he refused to sign a traffic ticket, according to previous media reports. 
  • A former Michigan health official testified Thursday that he started asking questions about bacteria in Flint’s water supply a year before the state publicly acknowledged an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease. Tim Becker, who was deputy director at the Department of Health and Human Services, acknowledged that the agency could have issued a public warning in January 2015. But it was 12 more months before the department and Gov. Rick Snyder said something publicly. Becker was the first witness at a key court hearing involving his former boss, department director Nick Lyon, who is charged with involuntary manslaughter in the death of an 85-year-old man and misconduct in office. A judge must decide whether there’s enough evidence to send him to trial. Lyon’s attorneys call the charges “baseless.” The attorney general’s office says a timely announcement about a Legionnaires’ outbreak in the Flint area in 2014-15 might have saved Robert Skidmore. He died of congestive heart failure, six months after he was treated for Legionnaires’.