ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
75°
Mostly Sunny
H 92° L 70°
  • clear-night
    75°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 92° L 70°
  • clear-day
    87°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Sunny. H 92° L 70°
  • clear-day
    87°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 92° L 70°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

National News

    Liliane Bettencourt, heiress to the L'Oréal cosmetics dynasty ranked as the world’s richest woman, died Wednesday, NPR reported. She was 94. >> Read more trending news In March, Forbes placed Bettencourt’s net worth at $39.5 billion. Bettencourt and her family were the largest stakeholders of L'Oréal, owning 33.1 percent of the company, the Financial Times reported. Bettencourt's daughter, Francoise Bettencourt-Meyers, confirmed the death in a statement to French media, saying her mother died 'peacefully' at her home in France. Bettencourt's father, Eugene Schueller, founded L'Oréal in 1909. The chemist created and patented a hair dye that helped launch the company into an international multibillion-dollar powerhouse. Upon his death in 1957, he left his daughter controlling interest in L'Oréal, The New York Times reported. Bettencourt served as board director until stepping down in 2012 when she was replaced by her then-25-year-old grandson, Jean-Victor Meyers. 'We all had a great admiration for Liliane Bettencourt who always looked after L'Oréal, the company and its employees, and was very attached to its success and development,' Jean Paul Agon, chairman and CEO of L'Oréal Group, said in a statement. 'She has personally contributed greatly to its success for many years.' Bettencourt's past included a long-standing family controversy that spilled into French politics, known as l'affaire Bettencourt, NPR reported. The scandal not only titillated French media but may have resulted in Nicolas Sarkozy's losing the presidency. In 2007, Bettencourt-Meyers, an only child, filed a criminal suit, accusing her mother's friend François-Marie Banier of taking advantage of an elderly woman not in full control of her faculties. Bettencourt had given Banier some billion dollars' worth of gifts, and he had reportedly suggested that she adopt him. Banier and several others, including business associates and lawyers, were all found guilty of exploiting Bettencourt, who the French court said was suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Banier was sentenced to prison and fined. Secretly recorded tapes and accusations by a disgruntled employee implicated Sarkozy as benefiting from Bettencourt's “largesse,” NPR reported. Sarkozy denied any wrongdoing, but was tainted by the scandal and was defeated by François Hollande in 2012.
  • President Donald Trump is lashing out at a Republican senator who opposes the last-ditch effort to overturn the Obama-era health care law. On Twitter Friday, Trump says: 'Rand Paul, or whoever votes against Hcare Bill, will forever (future political campaigns) be known as 'the Republican who saved ObamaCare.'' Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has said he'll oppose the latest bill because it doesn't abolish enough of Obama's 2010 law. The proposal to scrap President Barack Obama's health care law would shift money and decision-making from Washington to the states. It nearly has the support it needs for the vote expected next week, a deadline that's focused the party on making a final run at the issue.
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump and North Korea (all times local): ___ 7:00 a.m. President Donald Trump is again assailing North Korea Kim Jong Un, saying that he 'will be tested like never before.' In an escalation of the war of words between the United States and North Korea, Trump sent a predawn tweet Friday saying, 'Kim Jong Un of North Korea, who is obviously a madman who doesn't mind starving or killing his people, will be tested like never before!' Trump's broadside follows a rare statement issued by Kim, branding the U.S. president as 'deranged' and warning he will 'pay dearly' for his threat to 'totally destroy' the North if it attacks. Hours later, North Korea's foreign minister reportedly said his country may test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean. ___ 3:30 a.m. President Donald Trump has added economic action to his fiery military threats against North Korea, authorizing stiffer new sanctions in response to the Koreans' nuclear weapons advances. Trump's latest steps to punish foreign companies that deal with the North was the latest salvo in a U.S.-led campaign to isolate and impoverish the government of Kim Jong Un until it halts the missile and nuclear tests. Trump announced the measures Thursday as he met leaders from South Korea and Japan, the nations most immediately imperiled by North Korea's threats of a military strike. Hours later, Kim branded Trump as 'deranged.' The rare statement from the North Korean leader responded to Trump's combative speech days earlier where he not only issued the warning of potential obliteration for the isolated nation, but also mocked the North's young autocrat as a 'Rocket Man' on a 'suicide mission.
  • A Brockton woman tells Boston 25 News she is living in fear knowing that the person who broke into her home is still on the loose. Renee asked to use only her first name out of fear. She says she grabbed a broom to go clean her 9-year-old son’s room, but when she went through the door she noticed something was off. >> Read more trending news “I said why is the Playstation on the bed. I'm thinking, what did my son do this morning. I looked here. I said that's weird. I saw out of the corner of my eye, someone standing like this,” Renee told Boston 25 News reporter Malini Basu. Her first reaction was to use the broom in her hand as a weapon. “I was hitting him. ‘Get out of my house, get out, get out, leave my house now,’” she said. He wasn’t leaving, so she turned and ran outside. “Screaming bloody blue murder, no cars around. I'm yelling ‘he's in my house, call the cops,’” she said. The suspect stole thousands of dollars worth of electronics and jewelry.He also stole the family’s sense of safety. “I can't sleep. I'm constantly looking over my shoulder,” Renee said. Renee lives in the home with her husband, son, 22-year-old daughter and 4-year-old granddaughter. “I hope it was worth it, he has kids scared, my mom scared. There are little kids that live here,” Renee’s daughter Erica said.
  • Today is the first day of the fall season, as the autumnal equinox signals the beginning of astronomical fall. This year, that happens across North America on Friday afternoon. So as the weather begins to cool across the country, here are some things to know about that season when the leaves change color and the temperature begins to drop. >> Read more trending news  What exactly is an equinox?Twice a year, either on March 20 or 21 and Sept. 22 or 23, the sun’s rays shine directly over the earth’s equator. March is known as the vernal equinox, or spring equinox in the Northern Hemisphere. September is known as the autumnal equinox. What occurs during the autumnal equinox?During the autumnal equinox, day and night are balanced to about 12 hours each all over the world. Earth’s axis of rotation is perpendicular to the line connecting the centers of the Earth and the sun. What is the definition of equinox?The word equinox was formed by two Latin words: 'Equi' is the Latin prefix for 'equal' and 'nox' is the Latin word for 'night.' Fall back: When does daylight saving time end?This year, daylight saving time began on March 12. It will end on Sunday, Nov. 5. What time is the official start of fall season?It depends on where you live, of course. Autumn officially arrives at 4:02 Eastern Daylight Time. Central Daylight Time is at 3:02 p.m., followed by Mountain Daylight Time (2:02) and Pacific Daylight Time (1:02).For everywhere else around the world, convert your time here.
  • A Florida pastor with a heart for helping is going old school to get information from Puerto Rico. >> Read more trending news An antenna coming out of his window, strung through the trees up over his house, is connecting Ian Thomas to the unreachable. Early Thursday morning, his ham radio was silent.  'And by 9:30, things started jumping. And then we were talking to Puerto Rico,” he said. Many people in Central Florida, like Alexandra Ale, have family on the island that was devastated by Hurricane Maria. 'I was feeling like I was suffocating because my hands are tied and kind of just waiting around to hear from someone,' Ale said. Thomas is taking requests from people across the United States, then doing what he can to find out through radio waves if they're all right. 'They just need someone to knock on the door and say, 'Are you still alive? Are you OK, Grandma?' “Because you have an 80-year-old lady who didn't think anything would happen and no one's checked on her,” Thomas said. The process is tedious, but he's not going to stop because he knows for so many families, giving up on loved ones is not an option. Ale is thankful because her family is one of few with enough phone service to get a message out. She now knows at the very least they are alive. 'My sister's words, 'It looks like a bomb exploded,’” she said.
  • Attorneys for Texas are asking a federal appeals court in New Orleans to let the state's law banning 'sanctuary cities' take effect. U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia blocked much of the law Aug. 31 — the day before it was to take effect. On Friday, three judges of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will be asked to let the law take effect ahead of a November appeal hearing. Under the law, Texas police chiefs could face removal from office and criminal charges for not complying with federal immigration officials' requests to detain people jailed on non-immigration offenses. Various local governments in Texas are fighting the law, which also allows police to inquire about people's immigration status during routine interactions like traffic stops — a provision Garcia didn't block. Municipal officials from Dallas, Houston, El Paso, San Antonio and Austin are among the opponents. The American Civil Liberties Union is fighting the law on behalf of the city of El Cenizo. The Mexican American Legal Defense fund represents other localities. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has praised the Texas law and the Department of Justice filed arguments in support of it, as did several states' attorneys general. The law's opponents argue in briefs that the law puts law enforcement officers in violation of the Fourth Amendment by requiring them to detain people suspected of illegal immigration without probable cause. They also argue that it illegally puts local police in the federal role of immigration enforcement officers, and that it is unconstitutionally vague as to exactly when a local law enforcement officer would be in violation of the law. Supporters of the state law say immigration officials have already determined probable cause when they seek to have local officials detain someone. They also argue that federal and local officials have a long history of cooperation on immigration matters and that the law is clear in its prohibition against local government's policies restricting immigration enforcement. The law, known as Senate Bill 4, would have taken effect Sept. 1 had Garcia not issued a stay last month. The measure won passage in the Republican-controlled Texas Legislature and was signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott despite opposition from business groups, which worried that it could cause a labor-force shortage and send a negative economic message. Judges James Dennis, Leslie Southwick and Stephen Higginson will hear the arguments. Dennis was nominated to the court by Democratic President Bill Clinton; Higginson, by Democratic President Barack Obama; Southwick, by Republican President George W. Bush.
  • Hurricane victims in the Florida Keys are receiving fresh barbecue meals from Operation BBQ Relief thanks to an airlift program by FedEx, USA Today reported. >> Read more trending news FedEx began airlifting more than 10,000 meals a day from Fort Myers to the Keys, following through on a request from one of its aircraft mechanics, Scott Guy. FedEx assigned two feeder aircraft to transport 3,700 pounds of food each day to residents affected by Hurricane Irma from Sunday through Wednesday, USA Today reported. Guy is a member of Operation BBQ Relief, which was formed to feed the hungry after a tornado struck Joplin, Mo., in 2011. The organization served 371,760 meals over 11 days on the Texas Gulf Coast after Hurricane Harvey, then shifted its focus to the Florida region hit by Hurricane Irma, USA Today reported.
  • The location of three Confederate memorials standing on North Carolina's old Capitol grounds for over a century could depend on a panel of professors and historic preservation boosters asked by the governor to move the monuments to a Civil War battle site. The North Carolina Historical Commission meets Friday to consider Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's request to relocate the monuments to Bentonville Battlefield, which is about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of Raleigh. The memorials include a 75-foot-tall (23-meter-tall) obelisk remembering all of the state's Confederate dead. There are also two smaller statutes. Cooper announced his plans in the weeks following a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the subsequent toppling of a local monument in Durham. State and local governments across the South are debating and reconsidering the placement of Confederate symbols following last month's violence and the 2015 shootings of black parishioners at a South Carolina church. 'Our Civil War history is important, but it belongs in textbooks and museums — not a place of allegiance on our Capitol grounds,' Cooper wrote. But a 2015 state law approved by the Republican-controlled General Assembly prohibits their removal from public property without legislative approval and restricts relocation. The law says the 11-member commission can relocate a monument to a site 'of similar prominence, honor, visibility, availability and access.' A Cooper Cabinet secretary petitioning the commission says Bentonville complies with the relocation requirement and would put the monuments in historical context. Republican legislative leaders wrote to commission members Thursday, urging them not to grant Cooper's request. The Republicans say the reasons being given for the relocation and the Bentonville battle site don't meet the law's requirements. Senate leader Phil Berger told Cooper in a letter that any decision to approve the relocation would likely be overturned in court with litigation. 'The spirit and the letter of the law do not allow for the granting of the governor's request,' a memo from Speaker Tim Moore and other House Republicans reads. The March 1865 battle at Bentonville marked the last full-scale action of the Civil War in which a Confederate army mounted a tactical offensive. The monuments join others that currently stand on the city square in downtown Raleigh where the old Capitol building was completed in 1840. The legislature met there until 1963. Cooper's office is now inside. A monument on the square to honor the contributions of black North Carolina residents is being planned.
  • The word “dotard” is not new, although it hasn’t been used lately in polite (or even impolite) conversation. Kim Jong-Un unearthed it during a speech he made Friday; translators used the word “dotard” in describing President Donald Trump. >> Read more trending news  Dictionary.com defines “dotard” as, “a person, especially an old person, exhibiting a decline in mental faculties; a weak-minded or foolish old person.” Merriam-Webster cites the first known use of the word in the 14th century and notes it’s in the “bottom 30 percent of words” on its website. It defines dotard as “a person in his or her dotage.” >> Twitter abuzz after Kim calls Trump a “dotard” “Dotage” is defined by Merriam-Webster as “a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness.” According to the Ngram tool on Google, the word “dotard” peaked in 1823. William Shakespeare was a fan of the word. In “Much Ado About Nothing,” Leonato defends himself against Claudio and tells the soldier: “Tush, tush, man, never fleer and jest at me. I speak not like a dotard nor a fool.” In “Taming of the Shrew,” Baptista commands that Vincentio be imprisoned, saying 'Away with the dotard; to jail with him.”The “Irish Monthly Magazine of Politics and Literature” from 1833 carries this sentence: “A father’s stern command resigned her to the arms of a dotard. …”The “Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction” from 1842 contains this sentence: “This old favourite, and ‘father of cheap literature,’ though advanced in years, is not cast off as a thing lacking in interest; a dotard in its second childhood; but, on the contrary, is now looked upon as a hoary-headed sage, abounding in humour. …”Dotard appears to be making a comeback, thanks to Kim.
  • Hurricane victims in the Florida Keys are receiving fresh barbecue meals from thanks to an airlift program by FedEx, reported. >> Read more trending news FedEx began airlifting more than 10,000 meals a day from Fort Myers to the Keys, following through on a request from one of its aircraft mechanics, Scott Guy. FedEx assigned two feeder aircraft to transport 3,700 pounds of food each day to residents affected by Hurricane Irma from Sunday through Wednesday, USA Today reported. Guy is a member of Operation BBQ Relief, which was formed to feed the hungry after a tornado struck Joplin, Mo., in 2011. The organization served 371,760 meals over 11 days on the Texas Gulf Coast after Hurricane Harvey, then shifted its focus to the Florida region hit by Hurricane Irma, USA Today reported.
  • Americans suffering from drug and alcohol addiction often find themselves with few alternatives outside of a jail cell or expensive rehabilitation facilities. But there is an alternative, available in Tulsa, that provides a chance to turn one’s life around with the help and support of others who know what the struggle is like. The organization is called Oxford House, and local outreach worker Thomas Floyd says it has experienced rapid growth in Oklahoma in recent years. “It’s actually the largest sober-living organization in the world,” he told KRMG. “How I actually got involved with it was a life of 20 years of addiction, incarceration, all those things. And the last time I was incarcerated, some people came in to the prison I was in and talked about Oxford House.” He moved into an Oxford House in 2013, he said. “The men in that house taught me about a 12-step program and how to live a productive life,” Floyd added. “We’re growing at a really fast rate here in Oklahoma, we’re up to 102 houses, 899 beds, in which we accept individuals either off the street, or out of treatment or detox, or just like me, out of prison. And we get them plugged into a 12-step program and teach them how to live life, on life’s terms.” He said there are three charter requirements for an Oxford House, which are segregated into house that accept males, females, or females with children. “The house must be democratically ran, it must be financially self-supporting, and it must evict anyone who drinks or uses.” He said residents have to pitch in on chores, hold a job, and contribute to the house’s collective finances. One can check the Oxford House vacancies website to see if any room is available in a particular area. A check by KRMG showed a number of beds available in the Tulsa area. To learn more about Oxford House, visit the website.
  • Ahead of a Tuesday Republican runoff, President Donald Trump is fully inserting himself in a U.S. Senate race in Alabama, holding a rally Friday night for Sen. Luther Strange (R-AL), who faces a spirited challenge from former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore, in a race that has strained GOP alliances in the Yellowhammer State. The President will stop tonight in Huntsville, Alabama – not far from there, Mr. Trump had a gigantic rally back in late February of 2016, as he drew some 30,000 people to a football stadium in Madison. “I am supporting “Big” Luther Strange because he was so loyal and helpful to me!” Trump wrote in one of a number of tweets about the Alabama race. Senator Luther Strange has gone up a lot in the polls since I endorsed him a month ago. Now a close runoff. He will be great in D.C. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 21, 2017 Behind in the polls, Strange used a Thursday night debate with Moore to repeatedly remind Alabama voters who the President was supporting. “The first question is, who does the President support? The President supports me,” Strange said. As for Moore, he has drawn support from a number of conservative Republicans, but now finds himself pitted against someone who has the backing of the President, something that Strange mentioned several times at a debate on Thursday night. “This race is not me against the President,” Moore said. Moore would seem to be a perfect ally for the President – someone who rails against the GOP Establishment, focusing much of his ire on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell – but Mr. Trump has stuck with “Big Luther,” who has trailed in the polls leading up to the runoff. “If they believe in Trump’s agenda – Moore is the clear choice,” said Rep. Steve King (R-IA), “but if they follow the cult of personality – then Strange.” Both US Senate Candidates have delivered their opening statements. pic.twitter.com/ogDS7MlRRT — Jalea Brooks (@JaleaBrooks) September 21, 2017 Strange was appointed earlier this year to fill the seat of Jeff Sessions, who left the Senate to become U.S. Attorney General – Sessions was the first Senator to support Mr. Trump, but that has not earned him any loyalty from the President, who has castigated Sessions repeatedly. While the President has backed Strange, Moore has received the backing of Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), who ran third in the original primary. But the big voice on Friday will be that of President Trump, who has certainly been putting his political capital on the line for Strange. Alabama is sooo lucky to have a candidate like 'Big' Luther Strange. Smart, tough on crime, borders & trade, loves Vets & Military. Tuesday! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 20, 2017
  • Special counsel Robert Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump's oldest son, The Associated Press has learned. Mueller's office has requested a large batch of documents from the White House and is expected to interview at least a half-dozen current and former aides in the coming weeks. Lawyers for the White House are in the process of trying to cooperate with the document requests. Though the full scope of the investigation is not clear, the information requests make evident at least some of the areas that Mueller and his team of prosecutors intend to look into and also reveal a strong interest in certain of Trump's actions as president. A person familiar with the investigation who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation said investigators want information on, among other topics, a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower that Donald Trump Jr. attended with a Russian lawyer as well as on the administration's response to it.
  • Former Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby was acquitted of criminal charges in the death of Terence Crutcher, but the Crutcher estate has moved forward with civil litigation. [CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story on KRMG.com indicated the city council had voted to pay for Shelby to hire private representation. We have corrected this after speaking with the Office of the City Attorney] The Tulsa City Council voted Wednesday night to allow the Office of the City Attorney to represent Shelby in that federal lawsuit.  Gerry Bender, the Litigation Division Manager for the city attorney’s office, tells KRMG that is standard procedure when a city employee faces litigation over something that happened in the performance of their professional duties. “There’s a process whereby any city employee - whether police, fire, someone working out in the field for water or sewer or anything else - if they get sued for doing something that occurred during the course and scope of their duties as an employee, they are allowed to make a request to the city council to have the city attorney’s office represent them, and that’s what happened in this particular instance,” Bender said Thursday. “When Officer Shelby was served, she came to our office with a request. That request was passed on to the city council. The city council went into executive session last night to consider that request, and when they came out of executive session the city council voted to extend representation by the city attorney’s office to former Officer Shelby.” The City of Tulsa is also named as a respondent in the lawsuit. Bender said there has also been a tort claim filed, which Bender says was filed “to attempt to satisfy requirements of the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act, which is a negligence standard, but that was filed with the city after the complaint was filed, and we’re going to take issue with the timeline on that.” There is no hearing scheduled yet in the federal lawsuit.