Breaking News

Report: North Korea test-fires missile

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
74°
Overcast
H 77° L 60°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    74°
    Current Conditions
    Thunderstorms. H 77° L 60°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    60°
    Morning
    Thunderstorms. H 77° L 60°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    68°
    Afternoon
    Thunderstorms. H 69° L 49°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

National
Mom arrested for allegedly leaving toddler in car at Lowe’s
Close

Mom arrested for allegedly leaving toddler in car at Lowe’s

Mom arrested for allegedly leaving toddler in car at Lowe’s
Melissa Mae Jackson, 39, of Marietta, was charged with reckless conduct, according to Sandy Springs police.

Mom arrested for allegedly leaving toddler in car at Lowe’s

The mother accused of leaving her toddler in the car while she went inside a Lowe’s store was arrested Thursday, thanks in part to witnesses who quickly alerted police.

“Without the witnesses, we wouldn’t have a case,” Sandy Springs police Sgt. Ron Momon told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Witnesses called police Sunday afternoon after seeing a young girl crying inside a locked car, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution previously reported. The child’s mother, later identified as Melissa Mae Jackson, left the store before police arrived, but was contacted Thursday by detectives and surrendered.

Jackson, 39, of Marietta, was charged with reckless conduct, Momon said. She was being questioned Thursday afternoon.

A couple, Amanda and Christopher Stanzione, saw the girl as they were leaving the Lowe’s, according to police.

“The little girl had tears running down her face,” Amanda Stanzione told Channel 2 Action News on Monday. “I don’t know really if it was tears or just sweat, because she was sweating profusely.”

The Stanziones called 911 and went back into the store to report the incident to a manager, according to police. The child’s mother was at the customer service counter and overhead the Stanziones, prompting her to get the girl from the car, the police report states.

Stanzione told police she confronted the girl’s mother, who said, “Don’t tell me how to parent,” the report states.

Witnesses were able to provide detectives with a tag number and description of the suspect, which assisted police with locating her, Momon said. The child was not injured, he said.

“We don’t believe she was in there a lengthy amount of time,” Momon said.

Per protocol, DFCS is also investigating, according to police.

— Please return for updates.

Read More
  • Friday night from 7-9:00 p.m. local time KRMG will air a special broadcast featuring a panel of KRMG listeners to discuss the first 100 days of the Trump administration, and we’re inviting you to join by phone, text, or by using the KRMG app.  We’ll be talking about his “Contract with the American Voter,” the promises made in that contract and the status of those promises.  We’ll ask our panel and our listeners how they would rate his performance so far, and whether he’s being held to a fair standard.  And we’ll discuss some of the challenges his administration faces in the near future, including health care, tax reform, and the budget.  You can call 918-460-KRMG (5764) during the show to join us live; text comments or questions to 95920, or use the “Open Mic” button on the KRMG app. Here are three of the President’s tweets which we’ll discuss on the show:
  • According to the DEA, in 2016 Oklahoma was dead last in participation in the National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. So Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter is urging the state’s residents to take part in the event this year. It falls on Saturday, April 29th. The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs has set up a location finder where people can enter their zip code and find locations near them to drop off their unused or expired prescriptions. Joy Mohorovocic, spokeswoman for the AG’s office, tells KRMG prescription drugs have killed a lot of people in our state in recent years. All too often, prescriptions that are no longer used end up sitting in medicine cabinets, where teens and even children can find them. “Parents may not know that their teenagers are getting into the medicine cabinet and taking the pills,” Mohorovicic said Friday. “They may not know that their friends are coming over and taking the pills from their medicine cabinet. So getting rid of those, getting them to the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics who will then dispose of them appropriately is the best thing that we can possibly do to curb teenagers from using them, as well as any other abuse.” Dumping the pills down the sink or toilet creates another problem; they become a pollutant that can harm wildlife and impact water quality. The DEA created National Take Back Day in 2010 to help cut down the number of accidental deaths from overdose. The event’s also designed to educate the public about the potential for abuse of unused or expired drugs. Just Wednesday, AG Hunter announced plans to form a Commission on Opioid Abuse in Oklahoma to try and address the crisis of addiction which has grown exponentially in the state - and in the nation - in recent years.
  • During a burn ban, there are serious consequences for setting off fireworks that lead to brush fires. But Disney World is allowed to continue its three firework shows. The theme park canceled fireworks in 1998, when brush fires scorched Central Florida. >> Read more trending news  Disney World recently suspended campfires at its resorts because of the burn ban, but the firework shows continue, and the Firefighters Union said small embers from the Star Wars show are starting brush fires. Interactive map: Burn bans in effect in Central Florida And that’s a problem when nearly all of Central Florida is under a burn ban.   “It’s over and over again. You can see the different spots we’ve had fires,” said Tim Stromsnes, president of the Reedy Creek Firefighter’s Association. He said there are new flare-ups nearly every night. Interactive map: How bad is Central Florida's drought? “My concern is that it’s taxing our guys. Some of our guys are out there 20 out of 24 hours,” Stromsnes said. He said Disney needs to clear about 1,000 feet of land to make it easier for firefighters to spot flare-ups. State records show the Florida Forest Service has to help three times since the Star Wars show debuted last June. In the past 17 years, the state has only been called out twice for fires started by Magic Kingdom’s fireworks, both in March 2007. Those fires prompted Disney to install sprinklers around the Magic Kingdom. Stromsnes said the same action should have been taken for Hollywood Studios. “How can something built 30 years later not have the foresight to (put) sprinklers in the woods?” he said. A Disney spokesperson sent a statement that said, in part, “Periodically, we modify fireworks shows based on weather conditions. We are not currently using certain types and sizes of fireworks at Hollywood Studios, and as recently as last week, we modified the use of slow-burning fireworks.” But at this point, it’s not been enough to shut the shows down entirely. “All I know is, the show goes on every night,” said Stromsnes. Firework shows with permits are exempt under Orange County's burn ban, but the permit comes from Disney's own fire department--Reedy Creek.
  • Harvesting Washington state's vast fruit orchards each year requires thousands of farm workers, and many of them work illegally in the United States. That system eventually could change dramatically as at least two companies are rushing to get robotic fruit-picking machines to market. The robotic pickers don't get tired and can work 24 hours a day. 'Human pickers are getting scarce,' said Gad Kober, a co-founder of Israel-based FFRobotics. 'Young people do not want to work in farms, and elderly pickers are slowly retiring.' FFRobotics and Abundant Robotics, of Hayward, California, are racing to get their mechanical pickers to market within the next couple of years. Harvest has long been mechanized for large portions of the agriculture industry, such as wheat, corn, green beans, tomatoes and many other crops. But for more fragile commodities like apples, berries, table grapes and lettuce - where the crop's appearance is especially important - harvest is still done by hand. Members of the $7.5 billion annual Washington agriculture industry have long grappled with labor shortages, and depend on workers coming up from Mexico each year to harvest many crops.
  • A nationally known televangelist who came to prominence in Florida has become the target of a federal warrant. >> Read more trending news  Federal agents on Wednesday raided the offices of Benny Hinn near Dallas. The search began about 9 a.m. Wednesday at Hinn's headquarters in the Dallas-Fort Worth suburb of Grapevine, near Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. According to Hinn's website, he was in Paris. Cameras caught IRS and postal inspectors walking in and out of his Texas office building. An agent would not go into specifics, but said his division investigated financial crimes against the government, including tax evasion. Hinn was one of six television evangelists investigated by the Senate Finance Committee in 2007. After three years, the committee made no definitive findings of wrongdoing. Hinn first gained notoriety in Florida in the 1990s, when he was the pastor of a church called the World Outreach Center. The Associated Press contributed to this story.