ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
84°
Partly Cloudy
H 100° L 79°
  • cloudy-day
    84°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 100° L 79°
  • cloudy-day
    96°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 100° L 79°
  • cloudy-day
    80°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 98° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Eric Cantor learns the hard way that you can’t ignore the tea party

Eric Cantor lost his Republican primary in a huge upset last night for one reason and one reason only:

He didn’t listen.

The lesson learned last night is that despite all the bluster from the political establishment about the tea party being dead, Republicans simply cannot afford to ignore them.

Yes, Cantor was the face of the Republican establishment thus making him a prime target. But so is Mitch McConnell, who, for all his faults, actively tried to to satisfy the conservative base and make friends with more popular Republican leaders.

Like Cantor, McConnell also had a tea party challenger. But he survives.

Cantor ignored the conservative grassroots. His constituents complained they never saw him. Instead of working with the tea party and libertarian members of his party, as McConnell tried to, Cantor denounced them and fought with them.

Yes, Cantor’s advocacy for immigration reform might have (or might not have) played a significant role in his defeat, but it is just one part of a larger narrative in which the old Republican guard continues to be out of touch with a changing GOP. Tea party Republicans Rand Paul and Congressman Justin Amash have talked about immigration reform too, but they remain popular with the grassroots. It’s what you mean by “immigration reform” that matters.

It’s how you talk to your own party that matters.

The Republican nominee for Virginia’s 7th congressional district, the libertarian-leaning Dave Brat, ran on a platform opposing Cantor’s version of immigration reform, crony capitalismNSA metadata collection and the indefinite detention of American citizens, to name just a few issues.

On each, the tea party stood with Brat and on the opposite side of Cantor. With Brat only spending about $120,000 and Cantor spending over $5.4 million, the conservative grassroots still won.

And the establishment lost. Huge.

In his predictions for the 2014 elections, Karl Rove wrote at the Wall Street Journal in December, “Every Republican senator and virtually every representative challenged in a primary as insufficiently conservative will win.”

Last night, the Republican House Majority Leader lost in a pretty dramatic fashion because he was seen as insufficiently conservative.

In the past Republican leaders have found that loyalty to Republican presidents, as Cantor was to Bush, or opposition to Democratic presidents, as Cantor did often with Obama, was enough to satisfy their base.

But mere partisanship won’t cut it anymore. The GOP base is becoming more substantively conservative than it was a decade ago thanks in large part to a tea party movement, that for all its faults, is as fed up with the Republican status quo as much as they are the Democrats. This is something many Republicans still working off of a 2000-08 playbook will continue to learn, possibly the hard way.

Remember, “Bush’s brain” Karl Rove thought Mitt Romney was going to win too.

Last night the conservative grassroots took down the House Majority Leader. They couldn’t have asked for a bigger scalp than John Boehner’s right hand man. Those who say that the tea party is dead really have no idea what they’re talking about.

The conservative base does have a voice and it intends to use it, this year, in 2016 and beyond.

And Republican leaders had better start listening.

See more at Rare.us

Jack Hunter is a contributing editor at Rare. Follow him on Twitter @jackhunter74.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • President Donald Trump announced via Twitter Wednesday morning that transgender individuals will not be allowed to serve in the military. President Trump said the health care and distraction would be too costly for the U.S. Current policy allows for transgender service members to serve openly and says “they can no longer be discharged or otherwise separated from the military solely for being transgender individuals.”
  • Celebrating a slim but symbolic health-care win in Washington, President Donald Trump told supporters in Ohio that the nation was one step closer to liberation from the 'Obamacare nightmare.' 'You think that's easy? That's not easy,' he told a crowd of thousands just hours after the Senate took a small but hard-fought first step Tuesday toward Republicans' years-long promise to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama's health care law. Clearly energized to be back in front of a friendly crowd of supporters, Trump said repeatedly that he believes in speaking directly to the American people and not through the 'fake news' media. And he joked about accusations that he doesn't act presidential. 'It's so easy to act presidential,' he said. 'But that's not going to get it done.' Trump said that with the Senate's vote to allow consideration of a health care bill, 'We're now one step closer to liberating our citizens from this Obamacare nightmare and delivering great health care for the American people.' Tuesday's trip to Youngstown, a staunchly working-class, union-heavy enclave that has long helped anchor Democrats in Ohio, served as a welcome distraction from Washington for a president who loves to relive his once-unlikely Election Day win. In a room filled with supporters, Trump talked up his first six months in office, claiming that no other president had done 'anywhere near' what he'd done in his first six months. 'Not even close,' he said. Far from questions about investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 campaign and his repeated attempts to discredit his attorney general, Trump painted the picture of a president adored by his country, despite his dismal approval ratings. Trumpeting his administration's tough approach to illegal immigration and criminal gangs, Trump described people 'screaming from their windows, 'Thank you, thank you,'' to border patrol agents and his Homeland Security secretary. 'We're liberating our towns and we're liberating our cities. Can you believe we have to do that?' he asked, adding that law enforcement agents were rooting out gang members — and 'not doing it in a politically correct fashion. We're doing it rough.' 'Our guys are rougher than their guys,' he bragged. Trump also said he's been working with a pair of Republican senators to 'create a new immigration system for America.' 'We want a merit-based system, one that protects our workers' and one that 'protects our economy,' said Trump, endorsing legislation introduced by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue that would put new limits on legal immigration. Ahead of the rally, Trump stopped by a veterans' event as part of the White House's weeklong celebration of servicemen and women. Following brief remarks by several of his Cabinet members, Trump entered a small room of veterans, several of them over 80 years old, and praised them for their commitment and sacrifice for the country. 'A truly grateful nation salutes you,' Trump told the group in Sutherland, Ohio. But he quickly shifted gears to recall his unexpected election win in Ohio, praising Youngstown and towns like it for helping him secure the electoral votes that put him over the top. 'It was incredible time we had. You saw the numbers,' he said. 'Democrats, they win in Youngstown — but not this time.' Trump has mainly sought to re-litigate his 2016 victory in friendly territory, escaping Washington to recharge with boisterous crowds that embrace his jabs at 'fake news' media, Democrats and even those Republicans whom Trump once vowed to defeat as part of his effort to 'drain the swamp.' Democrat Hillary Clinton herself did not frequent this stretch of the industrial Midwest in her campaign against Trump, instead dispatching her husband, the former president, on little-noticed bus tours of the region. Trump ended up narrowing Clinton's advantage to 3 points on his way to an 8-point victory statewide. The surrounding 13th Congressional District, which Trump lost by 6.5 percentage points, is among the Democratic-held seats that Republicans are targeting next year, and the local congressman, Rep. Tim Ryan, happens to be one of the Democrats' most intense internal critics. Ryan won two-thirds of the vote to win an easy re-election in November despite Trump's performance, a result that demonstrates the president's appeal among white voters who have historically backed Democrats. Shortly after, he ran unsuccessfully against Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., for House minority leader, and he continues to criticize the party for leaning too heavily on leaders from coastal states and failing to communicate a coherent economic message to much of the rest of the country. ___ Associated Press writers Jill Colvin in Washington and Bill Barrow in Atlanta contributed to this report.
  • Jared Price, 21, was arrested on Monday after reports came in of him riding in a “suspicious vehicle.” But, the term “suspicious” doesn’t even begin to describe the car that Price was operating. When police in New York pulled him over, they realized that the car had no doors, no windshield and no license plates, and an ax was sticking out of the roof. >> Read more trending news  WIVB reports that when Wethersfield police pulled over the vehicle, they administered tests to Price and realized that he was “impaired by multiple drugs.” He was arrested for the following crimes: DWAI-drugs DWAI by the Combined Influence of Drugs No License Plates Unregistered Motor Vehicle Operating Without Insurance No Front Windshield No Safety Glass His bail was set at $10,000 and he will appear in court again on Aug. 1. Spectrum News reported that the vehicle was towed. There are no reports of what became of the doors and why the ax was there.
  • Some individuals are getting free healthcare from one organization in the Tulsa area.   The only qualifier is that the patients have no insurance. Good Samaritan is operating 13 clinics in the Tulsa area providing medical care, food and clothes for about 200 patients per week. We're told many of those utilizing the service are treated for chronic ailments, including high blood pressure and diabetes.
  • Hours after Republicans barely mustered enough votes to start debate on a House-passed GOP bill designed to overhaul the Obama health law, the Senate easily rejected one plan put forward by Republican Senators, as GOP leaders continued to struggle to figure out how to forge a health care bill that could win final approval on the Senate floor later this week. The first casualty was an amended version of the “Better Care” plan from GOP leaders – along with additions from Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), who wanted to add back $100 billion in Medicaid funding, and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), who pressed for his ‘Consumer Freedom Amendment,’ which would let insurance companies that sell regular Obamacare plans also offer lower-cost plans with less health coverage. “What we know won’t work is Obamacare,” Cruz argued on the Senate floor. But the Cruz plan ran afoul of strict Senate budgetary rules, and needed 60 votes for approval. Republicans were not even able to muster a majority, getting only 43 votes, as nine GOP Senators voted against the plan. Nine GOP 'No' votes on BCRA as amended : Lee, Paul, Moran, Corker, Cotton, Graham, Collins, Heller & Murkowski — Jamie Dupree (@jamiedupree) July 26, 2017 “We can’t give up,” said Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA), as Republicans fully acknowledged they weren’t sure where the debate was headed in terms of the details of a GOP health care overhaul bill. “It will depend on what’s in the final bill, which nobody has any idea as to how that’s going to end up,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). “It’s going to be interesting to see what happens,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). Opponents of the Republican effort were still ramping up their efforts to push back against GOP health care plans, worried that something will pass late this week by the narrowest of margins. “The voting now means nothing,” said Andy Slavitt, who ran the operations of the Obamacare exchanges under the Obama Administration. “The backroom deals mean everything.” Reminder, several of the upcoming votes are window dressing while GOP leadership attempts to negotiate a compromise bill behind the scenes. https://t.co/gzoJJhDkNH — Joseph (@JoePWilliams31) July 26, 2017 More votes were set for Wednesday, as Republicans were desperately seeking a way to get almost anything approved this week – and then send that on to House-Senate negotiations.