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UPDATE: Suspects rob pizza restaurant at gunpoint
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UPDATE: Suspects rob pizza restaurant at gunpoint

UPDATE: Suspects rob pizza restaurant at gunpoint
Photo Credit: File photo

UPDATE: Suspects rob pizza restaurant at gunpoint

UPDATED: 11:20 A.M.

KRMG has new information on the suspects who held up a Little Ceasars last night.

Police say that two black men robbed the restaurant of approximately $1,600.

The suspects are described as between 18 and 22 years old, between 5' 7" - 5' 9" tall, with slender builds.

Both men were wearing white bandanas to cover their faces.

One suspect wore a red hoodie and the other man was wearing a black hoodie.

Both men had semi-automatic guns during the robbery.

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Several Little Caesar employees are ambushed late Saturday night, while taking a smoke break outside of their store.

Tulsa police say the armed robbery happened near 31st and Garnett, around 10 p.m.

The employees told officers two men approached them and each had a gun.

Police say the suspects took the employees back into the store, where they demanded and received an undisclosed amount of cash.

The suspects then took off on foot.

They were said to be two black males. Police say one was wearing a black hoodie and mask, while the other was wearing a red hoodie and mask.

Anybody with information about the robbery or the suspects is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.

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