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Tulsa man arrested on child porn, bestiality complaints
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Tulsa man arrested on child porn, bestiality complaints

Tulsa man arrested on child porn, bestiality complaints
Photo Credit: Courtesy Tulsa County jail

Tulsa man arrested on child porn, bestiality complaints

A 31-year-old Tulsa man has been arrested on two complaints of manufacturing child pornography and two complaints of crimes against nature.

Tulsa Police say Ricky Lewis had nude pictures of his own 8-year-old son on his iPhone, as well as multiple nude pictures of a young girl.

According to the arrest and booking report, Lewis had sent text messages, soliciting nude photos of a girl from the girl's mother.

The report says he solicited the woman to commit sex acts with his son, and described what sex acts he wanted to have with the woman's child.

The report also says there were photographs on Lewis' iPhone that show him having sex with his dog in his residence.

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  • The era of click wheel iPods is ending.  CNN reported that, following their removal from the Apple website, the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle have been discontinued.  Apple said in a statement Thursday that the two devices will no longer be in production. They can still be purchased in stores. Bloomberg reported that the iPod Touch model will still be produced and will have increased data capacity. iPod Touch devices with 16GB and 64GB of storage are being discontinued. The 32GB and 128GB models have changed in price and are now $199 and $229. “Today, we are simplifying our iPod lineup with two models of iPod touch now with double the capacity starting at just $199 and we are discontinuing the iPod Shuffle and iPod Nano,” an Apple spokesperson said in a statement, according to TechCrunch. The Associated Press reported that the sales of iPods have fallen so severely that Apple no longer provides sales stats for the devices.  In 2005, the iPod Nano replaced the iPod Mini when the Mini was discontinued that year. That same year, the iPod Shuffle was announced. The first iteration of the iPod was released in 2001.
  • A homeless man in Oklahoma is cleaning the streets of Tulsa in order to “right his wrongs,” according to police. Officer Popsey Floyd posted the story about Brian Freeman, aka Cleaner, on his Facebook page Wednesday. Floyd said that officers observed a line of trash bags on a Tulsa street and tracked down Freeman on Wednesday. Freeman told an officer that he is trying to set a good example for his son and wants to work rather than panhandle.
  • One certainly doesn’t have to own a home or a garden to find something interesting at the Home and Garden Expo of Oklahoma. From soup mixes to bedding, there’s a lot to see, do, touch, and taste with more than 200 exhibitors from across the nation gathered in one spot. Certainly, many of the vendors offer home improvements - pretty much any aspect inside or outside is covered. But others have offerings to tempt the palate. For example, there’s a lot of buzz this year about bacon jam. For those looking to beat the heat, it’s worth noting that the River Spirit Expo Square building is air conditioned to a comfy 72 degrees. Parking and admission to the show are free, and one lucky attendee each day will win $500 - no purchase required. For full details on times, visit the 2017 Home and Garden Expo page.
  • Republican plans to approve a slimmed down bill to overhaul the Obama health law abruptly ran aground early on Friday morning in the U.S. Senate, as Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) refused to support a last minute “skinny” GOP bill, forcing Republican leaders back to the drawing board in their quest to get a bill to the President’s desk to rewire America’s health care system. “I thought it was the right vote,” McCain told reporters as he left the Senate floor. Outside, there were cheers as the Arizona Senator – who has bedeviled members of both parties through his years – went home shortly after 2 am. Here is how it looked from the halls of the U.S. Capitol: 1. McCain goes Maverick on health care. When the vote on the GOP ‘skinny bill’ was set to begin at about 12:35 am, it was obvious that Republicans might not have the votes to prevail, as Vice President Mike Pence lobbied McCain, Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK). But all three stuck to their guns, and torpedoed the GOP effort on health care. McCain was the key, as he attracted the most attention from the Vice President during a 45 minute delay on the Senate floor. The Arizona Republican had made clear for days that he didn’t like the process, he didn’t like the details of the ‘skinny’ bill, and he wanted to see more bipartisan cooperation. McCain had his GOP colleagues gritting their teeth. McCain leaving the Capitol asked why he voted NO: 'I thought it was the right thing to do.' — Frank Thorp V (@frankthorp) July 28, 2017 2. Republicans stunned by health care setback. The looks on the faces of GOP Senators told the whole story on the Senate floor, as the realization hit home that McCain was not going to vote with them. After the vote it was grim in the hallways just off the Senate floor. “It was a big setback,” Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) said tersely. “This is sad,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI). The normally chatty Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE) pushed through a crowd of reporters without saying anything. “No, I don’t want to talk right now, Jamie,” Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) flatly said to me as he headed back to his office. What’s next now for the GOP on health care? “No big reforms,” said Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN). “That unfortunately will not occur.” 3. An unhappy President Donald Trump. After showering McCain with praise earlier in the week, when the 2008 Republican nominee for President returned to cast the key vote to begin this debate, Mr. Trump had to watch as McCain threw the bill into a Legislative Ditch. At 2:25 am, the President got on Twitter to issue his first reaction, taking the 51 Senators in both parties to task, and again repeating his threat to simply stand off to the side and watch the individual exchanges go down the drain. It’s not clear whether the White House will sanction bipartisan negotiations on health care, but it’s hard to imagine that this issue is just going to melt away. 3 Republicans and 48 Democrats let the American people down. As I said from the beginning, let ObamaCare implode, then deal. Watch! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 28, 2017 So great that John McCain is coming back to vote. Brave – American hero! Thank you John. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 25, 2017 4. Zombie health care bill. I have cautioned my colleagues for months not to declare this GOP effort dead, and I will repeat that advice again, even in the wake of this defeat on the Senate floor for Republicans. All it takes is one deal to flip McCain, Murkowski or Collins, and the GOP would be back in business. Remember, lots of people thought Speaker Ryan was wrong to keep pushing in the House, but then he suddenly found the votes for a bill that many thought was dead in early May. I wouldn’t write off that possibility in the Senate, especially if Republican Governors – like McCain’s in Arizona – get more involved in the process. All it takes is one vote, and it could be the Democrats looking glum. “We’re going to have to pick up the pieces and keep going,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI). The bill is not dead – McConnell just returned it to calendar. — julie rovner (@jrovner) July 28, 2017 5. Can there be any real bipartisan deal making? There have been talks for some time among Senators who are former Governors and insurance commissioners in both parties – now we’ll see if those gain more traction in a bid to find common ground to do something on health care. Some like Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) have been talking about brokering a bipartisan deal for months – Manchin told reporters repeatedly that he didn’t think those efforts would have a chance until the GOP lost a vote in the Senate. Now we’ll see if anything changes on that front. I ask each & every one of my colleagues to search their hearts for what their purpose of being here is. We must work in a bipartisan manner. pic.twitter.com/KSdEANa0gE — Senator Joe Manchin (@Sen_JoeManchin) July 28, 2017 6. The demonstrators outside the Capitol. When I went out to grab some dinner around 7 pm, I was surprised at how few people were outside the Capitol; I had expected a larger crowd with the health bill ready to come to a vote. Well, the size of the crowd did grow in the hours after that, and when the GOP ‘skinny’ bill was defeated, you could hear the roars from outside echoing back into the halls of the Senate. Just as it was a defeat for Republicans, it was a victory for Democrats and progressive groups, which had worked hard to try to preserve the Obama health law. The House victory for Republicans on health care in early May had been a bitter setback for Democrats. This time, those opposed to GOP reform plans enjoyed the moment. Here's the moment the crowd outside the Capitol learned Republicans didn't have the votes. pic.twitter.com/vawKkdygoY — Emma Roller (@emmaroller) July 28, 2017 7. What was in the “skinny” GOP bill? If you went to bed at a reasonable hour on Thursday, you missed the two hour life span of the new GOP proposal, the “Health Care Freedom Act.” After complaining for seven years (in many ways incorrectly), that Democrats had abused the legislative process in the passage of the Obama health law, Senate Republicans made the Democrats look like pikers. The bill surfaced just after 10 pm, there was two hours of debate, and then a vote. In between, a report surfaced from the Congressional Budget Office. Yes, the bill was only 8 pages long, but it was a brand new proposal that had suddenly emerged, with little time to be evaluated. Don’t overlook these details – as I mentioned above, they could resurface at any time in the future.
  • In an overwhelming vote of 98-2, the U.S. Senate on Thursday sent President Donald Trump a bipartisan bill that places new economic sanctions on Russia, Iran and North Korea, as members of both parties joined to send a message not only to those three regimes, but also the the White House, on the subject of U.S.-Russian relations. “We will not tolerate attacks on our democracy. That’s what this bill is all about,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) declared on the Senate floor. “This bill will prevent President Trump from relaxing sanctions on Russia without Congressional review,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH). “We’re all concerned about that.” “Today’s legislation will help us more forcefully defend our interests and hold these destabilizing regimes accountable,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). “This measure makes clear that Iran, North Korea and Russia will always be held accountable for their malicious actions,” said Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK). US senate has passed a sweeping new Russia sanctions bill by a vote of 98-2. Now headed to Trump for signature or veto — Robbie Gramer (@RobbieGramer) July 27, 2017 But because of the provisions that limit the President’s authority on sanctions against Russia, the White House has been reluctant to endorse the effort, as hours before the vote, officials were still refusing to say whether President Trump would veto this bill. “We continue to support strong sanctions against those three countries. And we are going to wait and see what that final of legislation and make a decision at that point,” said spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders. But the Senate vote of 98-2, and the House vote of 419-3, showed a Congress that was almost united in support of the plan, suggesting there would be more than enough votes to override a veto by Mr. Trump. Just voted for Russia sanctions. @POTUS needs to sign our bill now and show Russia that meddling in our elections has serious consequences. — Tom Udall (@SenatorTomUdall) July 27, 2017 “President Trump should sign this bill as soon as it hits his desk,” said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA). “Otherwise, he risks encouraging Russia’s interference in future elections.” From the outset, Mr. Trump has advocated a less confrontational approach with Russia, one that has been repeatedly rejected by members of both parties – and this bill was one more piece of evidence on that front. “This bipartisan bill is about keeping America safe, and I urge the president to sign it into law,” said Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA), the Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.