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Local
Tulsa's Election Headquarters: Results of Tuesday's runoff elections
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Tulsa's Election Headquarters: Results of Tuesday's runoff elections

Tulsa's Election Headquarters: Results of Tuesday's runoff elections

Tulsa's Election Headquarters: Results of Tuesday's runoff elections

UPDATE: Dean Martin tells KRMG he will ask for a recount in the race against fellow Republican Pat Key to become Tulsa County's next court clerk.

Voter turnout was sparse, but we now know who will advance to the general elections in November in Oklahoma's 2nd Congressional District, as well as which Republicans will take office as county clerk in Tulsa, as well as in Senate District 33 and House District 70.

Republicans chose Pat Key, currently chief deputy to County Clerk Earlene Wilson, who has announced her retirement.

Political newcomer Dean Martin lost by an unofficial vote total of 9,004 to 8,825.

Key had also received more votes in the June 26 primary.

She weathered a scandal of sorts when a worker for her campaign was arrested, accused of stealing Martin's campaign signs.

In a statement sent to KRMG, Martin explained his reasoning behind asking for a recount.

"With almost 17,829 votes cast, the margin of victory was only 179 votes, which is 1% of the vote," he said.  "And it's important that we ensure the accuracy of this election. With over 263 precincts in Tulsa County, we are talking a difference of less than 1 vote per precinct," Martin added, "and where I come from, that definitely calls for an 'instant replay.'"

In Oklahoma Senate District 33, two businessmen squared off for the GOP nomination, Tim Wright, now retired and Nathan Dahm.

Just over 100 votes separated the two in the primary.

Nathan Daum will now assume the office, as no Democrat or Independent filed to run.

He beat Wright by a final (unofficial) count of 2,071 to 2,418.

Ken Walker, who nudged Shane Saunders in the primary, will now represent Oklahoma House District 70, as no Democrat or Independent filed for the seat.

He won by a vote of  1,635 to 1,419, unofficially.

The incumbent, Rep. Ron Peters, had to step down due to term limits.

The most closely-watched race nationally didn't involve any voters in Tulsa County.

In Oklahoma's 2nd Congressional District, both Democrats and Republicans failed to choose a clear winner in the primary forcing runoffs for both nominations.

Republican businessman Markwayne Mullin beat Dist. 14 Rep. George Faught in the June primary, but didn't get a clear majority in the six-candidate race.

Tuesday, he handily won the GOP nomination to advance to the November election by a vote of 12,046 to 9,159, unofficially.

His Democrat rival will be Rob Wallace, who is a former assistant U.S. attorney and a former district attorney for Latimer and LeFlore counties and an assistant D.A. for Pittsburg and Haskell counties.

He easily beat Wayne Herriman, a businessman from Muskogee who now lives in Ft. Gibson.

The unofficial tally was Wallace 24,911 and Herriman 18,777.

Other races of area interest:

  • Delaware County sheriff: Harlan Moore defeated Mike Wilkerson; both men are Democrats, no Republican ran.
  • Skiatook Prop. 1 $7.7 million for roof repairs, new auditorium seating, technology upgrades, and a new 2nd/3rd grade center, passed 637 to 276
  • Skiatook Prop. 2 $300,000 for transportation, passed 634 to 281
  • Bartlesville Prop. $11.625 million for technology, band uniforms, new early childhood center, passed 4,197 to 2,213
  • Bartlesville Prop. 2 $1.05 million for transportation passed 4,328 to 2, 184

 


All results unofficial until certified by the Oklahoma Election Board:

 

Runoff Results, Key Races, Aug. 28, 2012

Tulsa County Clerk
Pat Key 9,004 Dean Martin 8,825
OK House Dist. 70
Ken Walker 1,635 Shane Saunders 1,419
OK Sen. Dist. 33
Tim Wright 2,071 Nathan Daum 2,418
U.S. Rep. Dist. 2 Democrat
Rob Wallace 24,911 Wayne Herriman 18,777
U.S. Rep. Dist. 2 Republican
Markwayne Mullin 12,046 George Faught 9,159
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