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Tulsa County burn ban extended again
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Tulsa County burn ban extended again

Tulsa County burn ban extended again

Tulsa County burn ban extended again

Tulsa County Commissioners extended the burn ban in Tulsa County until July 30, 2012. Commissioners are scheduled to consider an additional burn ban at that time.

The resolution prohibits outdoor burning in the county including controlled burns and bonfires.

Emergency management officials have been surveying area fire departments for the last several days.  The results, along with the weather forecast determined that conditions were appropriate for a burn ban according to the guidelines for extreme fire dangers set out in state law.

The current burn ban allows exceptions for outdoor grilling with electric or gas grills as long as that grilling is done over gravel, concrete, or another non-flammable surface.  In addition, all operating grills should be attended by an adult who has direct access to a water source.

On July 30, 2012, Tulsa County Commissioners will meet to assess the need for an extended burn ban.  If significant rain fall occurs in Tulsa County, the ban may be lifted.

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  • “Wrestling moves” applied by a man are fatal for 2-year-old girl.   Authorities say one of the moves 24-year-old Richard Gamache Jr. of House Springs allegedly used involved picking up the girl and slamming her to the ground.    Jefferson County Sheriff David Marshak says the girl was hospitalized after having a seizure on May 16. She died three days later.    Gamache was charged Tuesday with abuse of a child resulting in death. His girlfriend, 19-year Cheyenne Cook, is charged with endangering the welfare of a child. The toddler's name hasn't been released.    Gamache is jailed on $500,000 bond.
  • A suicide attempt fails for a man, but kills his girlfriend instead. A trial date has been set for the 21-year-old man accused of fatally shooting his girlfriend when he tried to kill himself and the bullet struck the woman after passing through his head.   Victor Sibson wore a helmet during his brief appearance in court Tuesday. He was scheduled for an Aug. 21 trial.   Sibson has pleaded not guilty to a charge of second-degree murder in the April 19 death of Brittany-Mae Haag after she was shot at the couple's Anchorage apartment.   Members of both their families attended Tuesday's court hearing.   Prosecutors say one casing was found at the scene of the shooting, and the bullet was recovered from Haag's chest during her autopsy.   Sibson is represented by the Alaska Public Defender Agency, which declined to comment.
  • While some of the plans proposed in President Donald Trump’s $4.1 trillion budget for 2018 seem unlikely to be approved by the Congress, the document sets out a unique road map of how the Trump Administration views a variety of functions within the federal government, and what items the White House would like to get rid of – big and small. Here are eight things you might have missed in the fine print of the 2018 Trump budget: 1. An effort to close down excess military bases. The Trump budget includes a provision to start a round of military base closures in 2021, an idea that is sure to draw strong opposition, despite clear evidence that the military has too much overhead and infrastructure. Lawmakers have routinely rejected such efforts in recent years, with some still simmering about the impact of past base closure rounds – especially the last one in 2005. “The Department of Defense (DOD) has approximately 20 percent excess infrastructure capacity across all Military Departments,” the budget argues. While it may make sense to some, the odds are probably stacked against this provision in the Congress. File this under 'things that will go nowhere.' Trump's Pentagon budget proposes a BRAC, @LeoShane writes. https://t.co/xnvAv755VV — Valerie Insinna (@ValerieInsinna) May 23, 2017 2. End funding for public broadcasting. For a number of years, Republicans have pushed to reduce the amount of money that the feds put into public broadcasting, and President Trump’s plan would do away with almost all the $484 million being spent this year on such activities, leaving $30 million to wind down operations. The White House argues that PBS and NPR ” could make up the shortfall by increasing revenues from corporate sponsors, foundations, and members.” As with the effort to close down military bases, the odds would seem to be against this – but Congress will have the final say. As expected, Trump's budget calls for zeroing out funding for public broadcasting, arts and humanities. https://t.co/79EO9ZOeJM — Ted Johnson (@tedstew) May 23, 2017 3. When is a Medicaid cut not a Medicaid cut? I have always tried to be very careful about using the term “cut” – because too often, there are not budget cuts, but just reductions in the level of increase in a program. Let’s look at Medicaid in the President’s 2018 budget as an example: If you look at this graphic, you will see how the President’s budget would save $610 billion by reforming Medicaid. The second set of figures is the “baseline” for Medicaid – where spending would go without any changes. That says $408 billion would be spent on Medicaid in 2018, ending up at $688 billion in 2027. The bottom graphic is the Trump proposal, which has Medicaid at $404 billion in 2018 and $524 billion in 2027. “There’s not cuts at all,” said Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS). “It’s a matter of slowing the growth rate.” Yes, the Trump plan would spend less money than current built-in automatic growth rate, but the overall amount still goes up over the ten year budget. 4. But those are real cuts at CDC and NIH. One of the areas with some of the strongest bipartisan support is on medical research at the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. And so, when the numbers came in on Tuesday, there was a bipartisan negative reaction on cuts to NIH and CDC. NIH funding would be reduced by from $31.8 billion to $25.9 billion. CDC’s budget would go down $1.2 billion, a 17 percent cut. It’s a pretty good bet that lawmakers will not approve those cuts suggested by the President. The former head of the CDC expressed his displeasure: Proposed CDC budget: unsafe at any level of enactment. Would increase illness, death, risks to Americans, and health care costs. — Dr. Tom Frieden (@DrFrieden) May 23, 2017 5. Still few details on funding infrastructure plan. For months, the President and his top aides have talked about a $1 trillion infrastructure plan to build new roads and bridges in the United States. There was a fact sheet released by the White House, setting out some ideas, like rolling back regulations on how infrastructure projects are developed, but no new pot of money to fund $200 billion in seed money. “Providing more federal funding, on its own, is not the solution to our infrastructure challenges,” the White House noted. One of the few ideas offered was to allow states to levy tolls on interstate highways, and allow private companies to run rest areas. The Trump plan reduces spending from the highway trust fund by $95 billion over ten years. 6. Farm country not pleased with Trump budget details. If you had an infrared heat detector just off the Senate floor today, you might have seen the steam coming from the ears of Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), the Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee. Speaking with reporters, Roberts – well known for his dry wit – suggested the White House needs to make its budget writers count to 60 multiple times every day – to remind them that 60 votes would be needed for major farm policy spending changes. The Trump plan would save $38 billion over 10 years by limiting crop insurance subsidies and eligibility, streamlining conservation programs and more. Outside groups quickly made their voices heard on the proposed changes as well. It is hard to imagine these plans becoming law. The time and place to debate farm bill programs is during the #farmbill, not the annual budget. #Budget2018 — NCGA Public Policy (@NCGA_DC) May 23, 2017 7. Legal Services Corporation again on the chopping block. One of the first debates that I distinctly remember from my first summer on Capitol Hill in 1980 was an effort to cut money from the non-profit Legal Services Corporation, which provides legal aid to low income Americans. The LSC budget is $384 million for this year, and under the Trump plan, would be cut down to around $30 million, to allow for operations to be terminated. Again, this is another budget cut that seems unlikely to be approved, as GOP lawmakers, like Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), are already saying they oppose such a plan. I support funding of @LSCtweets. #READ why it's important via @daytondailynews: https://t.co/VZL37GU0CL — US Rep. Mike Turner (@RepMikeTurner) May 20, 2017 8. Trump wants to sell D.C. drinking water authority. Created by Congress in 1859, the Washington Aqueduct brings drinking water to Washington, D.C., and parts of the Virginia suburbs. While the drinking facilities operate under the auspices of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the water customers pay for all the operation and maintenance costs, as well as any improvements. Why does the White House want to sell this? “Ownership of local water supply is best carried out by State or local government or the private sector where there are appropriate market and regulatory incentives,” the budget documents state. It’s not clear how the feds estimated that selling the authority would bring in $119 million for Uncle Sam. Very proud to be your public servants! pic.twitter.com/BEOQXuYhmu — Washington Aqueduct (@WAqueduct) May 8, 2017 If you want to read more of the details about the Trump 2018 budget, you can find those on the White House website.
  • How much are the biggest tech companies worth? Try looking at the entire Chicago skyline. Just for comparison's sake, MarketWatch says Bank of America/Merrill Lynch looked at Apple's market value and Chicago's GDP and found that Apple has a value of $803 billion, while Chicago's GDP is 'only' $581 billion. In fact, Google with $654 billion also surpasses the Windy City. Both companies may eventually catch Los Angeles, which has a GDP of $832 billion. But the Big Apple lives up to its name, New York City with a GDP of more than $1.4 TRILLION. You can read more from MarketWatch here.
  • After a bomb detonated at a concert in Manchester, England, killing and injuring dozens, KIRO-TV asked a retired FBI agent what he thinks about and prepares for at large events.  >> Read more trending news  Retired FBI agent David Gomez said people should think about the following before attending a concert, sporting event or large gathering:  1. Don’t push through crowds to exit at the end of the show. While many fans are eager to beat the traffic, Gomez said he intentionally hangs back.  “I’m usually in no hurry to leave. Let the big crowds progress first. Let me have a clear space where I can watch,” Gomez said.  He said it’s harder to be aware of your surroundings when you’re shoulder to shoulder with the crowd. If someone on the outside is waiting to target a large group of people leaving a venue, the person will generally attack the first wave of people out the door.  2. Before the show starts, find the closest exit. Before the concert starts, look around for the closest exit. This might sometimes be a door toward the back of the venue, away from the doors where people entered.  Gomez compared it to the way he sometimes chooses where to sit in a restaurant: “We pick a table that’s away from the front door and close to the exit, rear door, so I know if somebody’s going to come in the front door and rob the establishment, or is going to shoot somebody in the establishment, I have an exit that’s not close to the front door.”  If someone enters through the back door, Gomez said he still has a clear line to the front door.  3. Note the security staff closest to you.  Know where they are in case you need to report suspicious activity or ask for help. In case of an emergency, they will likely be issuing instructions.  4. Discuss a meeting place for your group if you get separated. Make plans ahead of time so that if you are separated from your party, everyone knows where to meet. Members of your group should know that the spot might be adjusted if there is a threat inside the venue vs. the outside.  5. Observe who and what is around you -- not what’s on your phone screen. Matthew McLellan, a student on Mercer Island, told KIRO-TV he has attended concerts where many people are on their phones. He said he likes to send Snapchat photos to share his concert experience.  But McLellan said that because of this week’s attack, he’ll be thinking twice.  “It was shocking,” McLellan said. “Just seeing the numbers (of casualties) increase every couple of hours just hurts me.”  6. If something happens and you can’t find an exit, shelter in place.  Gomez said one girl who attended the concert in Manchester was reported to have stayed in her spot on the third level of the venue because she couldn’t find an easy way out. Police eventually entered the building to help people get out. 7. Before you go, check the venue website for specific entry rules. Some venues require clear bags only; some performers specifically call for no use of cellphones. Read the information on your ticket and on the venue website carefully before you leave the house so you won’t be turned away at the door or kicked out.  >> Related: Manchester attack at Ariana Grande concert: What we know now