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    Germany's Siemens says it has signed contracts worth some 700 million euros ($824 million) to build two gas-powered electricity plants in Libya.The Munich-based industrial conglomerate said Monday that the plants will be built in Misrata and Tripoli and that the value of the contracts with the state-owned General Electricity Company of Libya includes long-term service agreements.It said the deal will expand Libya's power generation capacity by about 1.3 gigawatts, but didn't specify in a statement when the new plants will start operation.The deal comes weeks after Siemens AG announced plans to cut about 6,900 jobs worldwide at its power, gas and drives divisions, half of them in Germany. It pointed to a sharp decline in earnings amid increasing pressure from renewable energy sources.
  • A Texas neighborhood is shaken by the deaths of two young children, which authorities believe came at the hand of their father. According to the Star-Telegram, police responded to a North Richland Hills home over the weekend after a mother called 911. The mother was uninjured, but two children and an adult man, later found to be their father, were found dead at the residence. >> Read more trending news “Upon arrival, officers found a 5-year-old female, 9-year-old male and adult male all deceased from apparent gunshot wounds. Initial investigation revealed the father shot the children and then shot himself,” North Richland Hills police said in a statement. The department went on to explain a search into the home’s records “revealed no prior history between [the] department and the family or address.” The names of those involved have not yet been released. “There’s no history here,” said police spokesperson Carissa Katekaru. “We’re still trying to figure out why. I grew up in North Richland Hills, and I would call this a pretty quiet neighborhood.” Neighbor Denise Albino, 57, has lived in the area for about 20 years. “Oh my God, those poor babies,” she said. “I just can’t understand why people do this kind of thing.” Albino said her son told her about the news. “I didn’t know them,” she added. “I would see the kids playing basketball all the time, but I never really got a chance to speak with them.” Another neighbor, Rosa Nichols, told KTVT: “You can drive by, and they can have a perfect house, but you don’t know what’s going on inside the house. It’s so sad.” “We lived there for several years and had some happy memories and sure hate to have sad memories made there for these families. For this family, we don’t know you, but we sure feel for you,” said Mike Bentley, who once lived in the home.
  • Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. PUTIN MAKES SURPRISE STOP IN SYRIA EN ROUTE TO CAIRO The Russian president visits a Russian military air base in Latakia and announces a partial pullout of his forces from the country. 2. DIVERGENT VIEWS ON WHAT ALABAMA SENATE VOTE MEANS The matchup between Roy Moore and Doug Jones mixes both the Deep South state's tortured history and the nation's current divisive, bitterly partisan politics. 3. MYANMAR MILITARY'S RAPE OF ROHINGYA MUSLIMS SWEEPING, METHODICAL In interviews with the AP, more than two dozen women and girls bolster the U.N.'s contention that the Myanmar armed forces are systematically using rape as a 'calculated tool of terror' to exterminate the Rohingya people. 4. FOR TRUMP, GOP A MOMENTOUS 2 WEEKS Republicans are determined to deliver the first revamp of the nation's tax code in three decades and agree on a spending bill to avert a government shutdown over the holidays. 5. WHAT ARE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF WORKPLACE SCANDALS Some women, and men, worry the same climate that's emboldening women to speak up about sexual misconduct could backfire by making some men wary of female colleagues. 6. FIREFIGHTERS BRACE FOR 2ND WEEK OF CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES Southern California fire officials anticipate more growth and danger due to continued strong wind gusts, no rain and decades-old dry vegetation. 7. DEADLINE WEEK CRUNCH FOR HEALTH LAW SIGN-UPS Friday is the last day for millions of people still eligible to enroll in subsidized private coverage in 39 states served by the federal HealthCare.gov website. 8. BITCOIN FUTURES RISE AS VIRTUAL CURRENCY HITS MAJOR EXCHANGE The futures contract that expires in January surges more than $3,000 to $18,580 eight hours after trading for the popular virtual currency launched on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. 9. WHO ARE FAVORITES FOR POST-WEINSTEIN GOLDEN GLOBES Steven Spielberg's Pentagon Papers drama 'The Post' and Christopher Nolan's World War II tale 'Dunkirk' are expected to lead the film categories, while Hulu's 'The Handmaid's Tale' and HBO's 'Big Little Lies' could be in for a big day on the TV side. 10. STEELERS CLINCH AFC NORTH Ben Roethlisberger throws for 506 yards and two touchdowns, becoming the first quarterback in NFL history to top 500 yards passing three times, as Pittsburgh (11-2) rallies past Baltimore 39-38.
  • Making his second visit to Egypt since 2015, Russian President Vladimir Putin flew to Cairo on Monday for talks with his Egyptian counterpart on the two countries' rapidly expanding ties and regional issues.Egypt's general-turned-president, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, has visited Russia three times since the ouster of his Islamist predecessor in 2013. After taking office, el-Sissi has bought billions of dollars' worth of Russian weapons, including fighter jets and assault helicopters.The two countries are also in the late stages of negotiations over the construction by a Russian company of Egypt's first nuclear energy reactor.Last month, Russia approved a draft agreement with Egypt to allow Russian warplanes to use Egyptian military bases, a significant leap in bilateral ties and evidence of Moscow's expanding military role in a turbulent Middle East.Putin flew to Cairo after a brief and previously unannounced visit to a Russian military air base in Syria, according to Russia's Tass news agency. The air base has served as the main foothold for the air campaign Russia has waged since September 2015 in support of Syrian President Bashar Assad against armed groups opposed to his rule.Egypt's currently close ties with Russia harken back to the 1950s and 1960s, when Cairo became Moscow's closest Arab ally during the peak years of the Cold War.Egypt changed allies in the 1970s under the late President Anwar Sadat, who replaced Moscow with Washington as his country's chief economic and military backer following the signing of a U.S.-sponsored peace treaty with Israel. Egypt has since become a major recipient of U.S. economic and military aid.In what would have been unthinkable during the Cold War, Egypt has under el-Sissi been able to maintain close ties with both Russia and the United States.Egypt, however, has not been able thus far to persuade Russia to resume its flights to Egypt, suspended since October 2015 when a suspected bomb brought down a Russian airliner over Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people on board. Egypt has since spent millions of dollars to upgrade security at its airports and undergone numerous checks by Russian experts to ascertain the level of security at the facilities.The suspension of Russian flights has dealt a devastating blow to Egypt's vital tourism industry. Britain, another major source of visitors, has since the Russian airliner's crash also suspended flights to Sharm el-Sheikh, a Red Sea resort in Sinai from which the Russian airliner took off shortly before it crashed.'Your Excellency: When will Russian tourism return to Egypt?' read the front-page banner headline in a Cairo daily loyal to the government, in both Arabic and Russian.There have been speculations that el-Sissi and Putin might during the visit finalize and announce a deal on the construction of the nuclear reactor on Egypt's Mediterranean coast after months of wrangling over technical and financial details.Egypt and Russia have already initialed an agreement for a $25 billion Russian loan to finance the construction.
  • Russian athletes are overwhelmingly in favor of competing at the upcoming Pyeongchang Games despite a ban on the national team, the country's Olympic committee said Monday.Sofia Velikaya said the Russian Olympic Committee's athletes' commission, which she chairs, has heard from 'all the athletes in all sports' on the Olympic program, with a majority in favor of competing.Velikaya said no athletes have told the ROC they would rather boycott.'At the current moment, everyone's training and everyone's hoping to take part in the Olympics,' Velikaya said.The International Olympic Committee last week barred the Russian team from Pyeongchang because of doping offenses at the 2014 Sochi Games, but is allowing Russians to compete under a neutral flag as 'Olympic Athletes from Russia.'Last week, Russian President Vladimir Putin said the government won't stand in their way.ROC spokesman Konstantin Vybornov said teams from biathlon and snowboard had recorded videos affirming their desire to compete, while the men's hockey team has written 'a collective letter.'Some Russian hardliners believe it is shameful for athletes to compete at the Olympics without their national flag. But Velikaya defended the athletes, saying everyone watching will know who is from Russia.'The choice of competing at the Olympics is strictly individual,' Velikaya said. 'I call on Russian society to treat athletes' decisions with understanding and respect.'With the IOC due to send out invitations to individual Russians over the next two months, Velikaya said Russian sports officials would put together lists of their preferred teams. Those rosters, she said, would stop the IOC from inviting 'numbers five and six' in the Russian team while leaving out genuine medal contenders.Russia is pushing back against some IOC conditions, however, backing appeals by Russian athletes banned for doping at the 2014 Sochi Olympics.Velikaya also said her commission will ask the IOC to remove a condition stopping athletes from being invited to Pyeongchang if they have been suspended for doping in the past. That affects a few athletes with earlier offenses unconnected to the Sochi Olympics, including biathletes banned for using the blood-booster EPO and speedskating world champion Denis Yuskov, who was suspended in 2008 after testing positive for marijuana.Forcing the Russians to compete as neutral athletes puts the IOC in the uncomfortable position of regulating how they celebrate.The Russian flag won't be flown at medal ceremonies, but what happens if a Russian winner accepts a flag or a gift from a spectator for a victory lap? Can Russian athletes fly the flag from their windows in the athletes village? Those are on a list of questions Vybornov said Russia will ask of the IOC.'A figure skater wins, let's say, and they throw her a teddy bear in Russian uniform onto the ice,' Vybornov said. 'She picks it up. Can she do that? Or is that an offense?
  • After being ejected in Sundays 30-24 loss against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Seahawks defensive tackle Quinton Jefferson jogged toward the tunnel leading to the visiting locker room.  >> WATCH: Injured Ryan Shazier celebrates Steelers' AFC North win from hospital Then Jefferson abruptly stopped and took off his helmet after it appeared a drink was thrown at him by a fan in the stands.  Jefferson moved toward the stands and began yelling when more fans threw concessions at him.  >> Click here to watch Seahawks staffers held Jefferson back as he tried to climb into the stands before he ultimately walked away into the locker room.  >> Read more trending news  Asked about Jefferson after the game, head coach Pete Carroll said, 'I don't even know what happened. ... He just kind of lost it.'  Carroll went on to say, 'It's really unfortunate how it ended. We had a chance to get the ball back. We have to be more poised than that.'  Defensive tackle Sheldon Richardson also was ejected late in the fourth quarter after officials said he threw a punch at a member of the Jaguars.  The (8-5) Seahawks return home to CenturyLink Field next Sunday to face the NFC West-leading (9-4) Los Angeles Rams. 
  • Baby milk maker Lactalis and French authorities have ordered a global recall of millions of products over fears of salmonella bacteria contamination.The French company, one of the largest dairy groups in the world, said it has been warned by health authorities in France that 26 infants have become sick since Dec. 1.According to a list published on the French health ministry's website, the recall affects customers in countries around the world, including: Britain and Greece in Europe, Morocco and Sudan in Africa, Peru in South America and Pakistan, Bangladesh and China in Asia.Company spokesman Michel Nalet told The Associated Press on Monday that the 'precautionary' recall both in France and abroad affects 'several million' products made since mid-February.Lactalis said in a statement that the 26 cases of infection were linked to products called Picot SL, Pepti Junior 1, Milumel Bio 1 and Picot Riz.It said it is 'sincerely sorry for the concern generated by the situation and expresses its compassion and support to the families whose children fell ill.'The company said a possible source of the outbreak has been identified in a tower used to dry out the milk at a production site in May. Disinfection and cleaning measures have been put in place at the suspected site in western France.The health scare started earlier this month when Lactalis was told that 20 infants under six months of age had been diagnosed with salmonella infection. The company ordered a first recall that has been extended to more products at the request of French authorities following new cases of infections.Lactalis employs 75,000 people in 85 countries, with a turnover of 17 billion euros ($20 billion).The symptoms of salmonella infection include abdominal cramps, diarrhea and fever. Most people recover without treatment.
  • Quick Facts: A man called police around 3:30 a.m. from the Haney's Super Stop near 36th North and Peoria Someone stole his car, which had his child inside About 10 minutes later, the suspected thief returned the car to the gas station The thief said she heard a cough inside the car, then realized a child was inside Police arrested the woman at the scene     Trending Now on FOX23.com Hard work lands Broken Arrow's Mossop at Air Force Trending news and local stories- LIKE FOX23 News on Facebook Baker Mayfield wins 2017 Heisman Trophy Download the FOX23 Weather app Oklahoma woman uses Christmas tree to share son's addiction story Trending Video Another home burns down in botched attempt to kill bedbugs with rubbing alcohol
  • Venezuela's ruling socialists swept nearly all the races for mayors across the country, and President Nicolas Maduro is now threatening to ban key opposition parties from future elections in the oil-rich country wracked by economic crisis.Hundreds of supporters shouted 'Go Home, Donald Trump' to interrupt Maduro at a rally late Sunday in the colonial center of Caracas, where he announced that pro-government candidates grabbed more than 300 of the 335 mayoral offices.Sunday's voting marked the last nationwide elections before next year's presidential race when Maduro is expected to seek another term despite his steep unpopularity.'The imperialists have tried to set fire to Venezuela to take our riches,' Maduro told the crowd. 'We've defeated the American imperialists with our votes, our ideas, truths, reason and popular will.'The elections played out as Venezuelans struggle with triple-digit inflation, shortages of food and medicine, and charges that Maduro's government has undermined democracy by imprisoning dissidents and usurping the powers of the opposition-controlled National Assembly.Three of the four biggest opposition parties refused to take part in Sunday's contests, protesting what they called an electoral system rigged by a 'dictator.' The last time the opposition refused to compete in congressional elections in 2005 it strengthened the government's hand for years.After dropping his vote into the cardboard ballot box earlier in the day, Maduro responded to the boycott.'A party that has not participated today cannot participate anymore,' Maduro said. 'They will disappear from the political map.'This has been a turbulent year for Venezuela, which holds the world's largest oil reserves but has been battered by low crude prices and a crash in production. The country saw months of protests that left more than 120 dead earlier this year, and it is now facing U.S. economic sanctions as it seeks to refinance a huge international debt.The struggles have caused the president's approval rating to plunge, although the opposition has been largely unable to capitalize on Maduro's unpopularity.Maduro said the third electoral victory for the ruling party in little more than four months signaled that the socialist 'Chavista' revolution begun by the late President Hugo Chavez has defeated its opponents who are intent on sowing violence in the country.In a country of 30 million people, 9 million cast ballots — about half of eligible voters. Maduro's opponents on social media questioned the figures.The mayoral elections follow a crushing defeat of opposition candidates in October's gubernatorial elections, where anti-Maduro candidates won just five of 23 races amid allegations of official vote-buying and other irregularities.Given the opposition's disarray, political analysts said they doubted Maduro's opponents would be able to rally behind a single candidate in next year's presidential election.'These were absolutely predictable results,' local pollster Luis Vicente Leon said on Twitter. 'It's absurd to think that an abstaining political force can win the majority of mayorships.
  • Clashes have erupted between police and protesters in Spain's northeastern Catalan city of Lleida after a judicial ruling ordered the city's museum to return 44 pieces of religious art to the neighboring regional government of Aragon.Regional police cordoned off the area around Lleida Museum early Monday as technicians prepared to remove the disputed artwork.Several hundred people turned up to protest the transfer and there were brief scuffles and police baton charges as officers tried to move them further away from the museum.An Aragon provincial court had given till Monday for the museum to hand over the art — which was originally housed in the region's Sijena monastery — following a 2015 court ruling.Catalonia bought the art from nuns in 1983 but the court ruled the sale illegal.
  • Three people were hospitalized and 10 are homeless after a Cincinnati woman and started a house fire instead, authorities said. >> Teen trying to kill bedbug starts fire, causes $300,000 in damage, firefighters sayThe rubbing alcohol — which is extremely flammable — ignited because of a nearby open flame, according to authorities cited by the New York Post. The ensuing fire caused $250,000 in damage to the five-unit multi-family Ohio home. Three people had to be hospitalized for smoke inhalation, according to CBS News. Their injuries are not considered life-threatening. For now, the American Red Cross is assisting and providing housing for those displaced by the inferno, WXIX reported. >> Read more trending news This is the second time that a rubbing-alcohol-fueled fire has burned down a Cincinnati house in as many months. Just after Thanksgiving, a 19-year-old lit a match after dousing a bedbug in rubbing alcohol, causing a fire that did $300,000 in damage to six apartments and left eight people homeless. Cincinnati District 3 Fire Chief Randy Freel told WXIX that people should stay away from any home remedies for bedbugs, especially the more flammable kinds. “Get a professional,” he said. Read more here.
  • With two weeks until Christmas, the to-do list is a long one for the Congress, as GOP lawmakers try to finish work on a sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code, fund the government into 2018, and look to deal with a number of other contentious issues that have eluded lawmakers and the White House, but it’s not clear how much the House and Senate will be able to accomplish before going home for the holidays “If things don’t get done, we are going to have quite a catastrophe,” said Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), one of many GOP lawmakers who remain confident that Republican leaders will find a way to reach a deal on tax reform. “I think this is one that we’re going to get done,” said Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). “There’s unanimity in the conference to get this done.” Here is what lies ahead for lawmakers in the Congress: 1. GOP must move quickly to finish tax reform bill. If Republicans are going to get a tax reform bill on the President’s desk before Christmas, they don’t have much time. Lawmakers certainly don’t want to be on Capitol Hill after Friday the 22nd; the first formal meeting of the House-Senate tax reform “conference” committee is on Wednesday, but that’s really more for show. Behind the scenes, key GOP lawmakers have already been trying to reach agreements on final language in the bill. If you want a full rundown on the differences between the House and Senate versions, read this comparison from the Joint Committee on Taxation. There have already been a number of stories about mistakes and loopholes in the GOP tax reform plan – we’ll see if those get resolved as well. This is no slam dunk, but the odds still favor the GOP. Tight squeeze. Conference draft by 11th. Many hairy issues. Must finish by 18th to do budget due on 22nd. Stephen Cooper and Dylan Moroses: 'Brady Says International Tax Changes May Need Transition' https://t.co/LutCCAUq2V — Martin Sullivan (@M_SullivanTax) December 8, 2017 2. Next stop gap budget runs out on December 22. There isn’t enough time to write a full “Omnibus” spending bill (Speaker Ryan said that last week), so the question is more likely how much will Congress get done on funding the operations of the federal government, and how much gets booted into 2018. Republicans have been making noise about approving a funding bill for the military, keeping all other agencies on a temporary budget, and then adding in a bunch of year-end sweeteners to the bill. It’s also possible that such a deal could increase the ‘budget caps,’ allowing for a larger defense budget, and maybe more domestic spending as well. The idea of increasing spending just before the holidays does not sit well with more conservative Republicans. And what about DACA and the immigrant Dreamers? There could be a lot of wheeling and dealing in the days ahead. Would Freedom Caucus support a CR compromise that includes CHIP, health CSR, or defense/non=BCA cap breaking? If not, Dems may be able to demand DACA in CR without getting full blame for shutdown or threat — Matt Grossmann (@MattGrossmann) December 10, 2017 3. Will there be more shoes dropping on Capitol Hill? After what was a historic week – where three members announced their resignations due to allegations of sexual misconduct – it’s not unreasonable to wonder if more stories will surface in coming days. There’s already pressure on Rep. Ruben Kihuen (D-NV) and Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-TX) to resign – an ethics probe was announced last Friday on Farenthold, who says he will pay back an $84,000 sexual harassment settlement with a former staffer. Over the weekend, reports surfaced about another possible taxpayer payout related to a harassment lawsuit, involving Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL). As a reporter, I cannot stress how unusual last week was on Capitol Hill. If you have one lawmaker announce a resignation, that’s a big deal. Two resignations was a major headline. And then a surprise third. One cannot discount the possibilities that more such stories are in the pipeline. Stay tuned. Taxpayers paid $220,000 to settle a sexual harassment suit involving Florida Democratic Rep. Alcee Hastings… https://t.co/j5dQct1nea — George Bennett (@gbennettpost) December 9, 2017 4. From member of Congress to anti-filibuster PAC? Last Thursday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) stunned his colleagues by announcing his resignation, effective January 31. But on Friday, he decided to make it effective immediately, citing the hospitalization of his wife, after revelations that he had tried to get female staffers in his office to be a surrogate for his child (not a campaign surrogate). In between those events, a Minnesota television news crew that was in Washington to cover the resignation of Sen. Al Franken (D-MN), stumbled into Franks at their hotel, as they overheard the Arizona Republican on the phone soliciting big money donations to start a political action committee that would fight to get rid of the filibuster in the Senate, which Franks, and other more conservative Republicans in the House have been blaming for inaction on the GOP agenda. The news crew that stumbled into that story must still be shaking their heads about their luck. Amazing: Minnesota news crew in DC for Franken overhears Trent Franks soliciting $2 million to start an anti-filibuster PAC https://t.co/TkAzUXx6Yz — Matt DeLong (@mattdelong) December 9, 2017 5. Roy Moore and the Alabama U.S. Senate race. Tuesday is finally Election Day in the Yellowhammer State, and no matter what else is happening in the halls of Congress this week, the outcome of this race will be a big deal. If Moore wins, a lot of GOP Senators won’t like the outcome. If Democrat Doug Jones wins, that will be a setback for President Donald Trump, who tried to stir support for Moore during a Fright night rally in Pensacola, Florida. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell telegraphed last week that if Roy Moore wins, then the new Alabama Senator is certain to face a review by the Senate Ethics Committee. Alabama’s senior Senator, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), made it clear again on Sunday that he wrote in someone else – instead of voting for Roy Moore. Just that part of the story is highly unusual, let alone all the other news stories that keep coming out about Moore’s past actions and beliefs. It would be an unprecedented situation if Moore wins, since so many GOP Senators have made it crystal clear that they want no part of him.
  • As Special Counsel Robert Mueller continues his probe of Russian interference in the 2016 elections and any ties to the campaign of President Donald Trump, Republicans in the Congress have joined Mr. Trump in stepping up attacks on the FBI, raising questions about political bias inside the top ranks of that agency, an effort that could well form the basis for partisan opposition to the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Those sentiments were on full display last Thursday at the first Congressional oversight hearing for the new FBI Director, as Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee repeatedly pressed Christopher Wray for answers on GOP allegations that partisan bias among top FBI officials had infected both the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s emails, and the review of any ties between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia. At the hearing, it didn’t take long for Republican frustration to boil over, as the FBI Director repeatedly refused to give detailed answers about the Clinton and Trump probes, saying – accurately – that the Inspector General of the Justice Department was reviewing how those matters were handled, as Wray sidestepped GOP requests for information. But that didn’t matter to GOP lawmakers. “I think you’re walking into a Contempt of Congress,” Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) snapped, criticizing Wray for fending off a variety of questions, as a number of GOP lawmakers all but asserted that the FBI was illegally withholding information from Congress on a number of fronts. Republicans also pressed for more background about two leading FBI officials, who were involved in both the Clinton and Trump probes, demanding more information about Peter Strzok and Andrew Weissman, who GOP lawmakers say expressed anti-Trump feelings to others inside the Justice Department, impacting both of those probes. Tied into all of this is the contention of some in the GOP that the FBI wrongly used the controversial “dossier” put together about President Trump during the 2016 campaign – which the GOP says was paid for by the Democrats – and possibly funneled to the FBI for its use. “I mean, there are all kinds of people on Mueller’s team who are pro-Clinton,” said Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), as some Republicans suggested a top to bottom review of key people in the Russia investigation to see if they are harboring anti-Trump sentiments. During the over five hour hearing, Democrats asked Wray several times about President Trump’s recent assertion that the FBI was in “tatters” after the stewardship of former Director James Comey. NEW: FBI Director Chris Wray responds to Pres. Trump's claim that bureau's reputation is in 'tatters': 'The FBI that I see is tens of thousands of brave men and women…decent people committed to the highest principles of integrity and professionalism.' pic.twitter.com/e7hb6GjK2u — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) December 7, 2017 “I am emphasizing in every audience I can inside the bureau, that our decisions need to be made based on nothing other than the facts and the law,” Wray said. But judging from the reaction at this oversight hearing – which could have covered any subject – the biggest concern for Republicans right now is pursuing allegations that the FBI was too lenient on Hillary Clinton, and too quick to investigate Donald Trump.
  • All crimes are bad, but a theft on Saturday at a south Tulsa Walmart can be described as despicable. KRMG has learned someone drove up to the front of the store near 81st and Lewis and stole a Salvation Army donation kettle filled with money.  The thief even got away with the tripod.   Capt. Ken Chapman, area commander of the Salvation Army Tulsa Metro Command, summed up the situation. “They’re literally taking food out of the mouths of people who are hungry,” Chapman said.  “People who need clothing and shelter.”  It's believed the kettle could have had around $800 at the time.  Investigators hope they find a suspect by reviewing surveillance video.   Chapman adds the theft is especially distressing because they are running about 20 percent behind on donations. Anyone with information regarding the theft is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.   
  • Get ready for a major change in the weather today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says the sun will come out and the forecast is looking gorgeous. “We should bounce back into the 60s,” Hodges said.  “Probably the mid-60s for the high.  It’s going to feel considerably warmer than what we’ve had for the last several days.” The low Sunday night will drop to 33 degrees. Your work week is going to be up and down temperature wise.  Hodges reports we’ll see highs in the 60s and the low 50s.   One thing we won’t have in Tulsa is snow.   “At least looking out at the next seven days, no, we’re looking pretty dry,” Hodges said.   Would you like to see snow in the Tulsa area?  Let us know in the comments.