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    A transgender teen who sued to be able to use the boys' bathroom has been honored by an organization of LGBT Justice Department employees. The case had been destined for the Supreme Court, which decided not to hear it after the Trump administration reversed an Obama-era directive on transgender access to public school bathrooms. DOJ Pride, an organization of LGBT Justice Department employees, on Wednesday recognized Gavin Grimm's contributions to the LGBT community. Grimm sued the board of his eastern Virginia high school for the right to use the boy's bathroom. Grimm told The Associated Press the award was 'beautifully symbolic of the fact that there are still people working for equality in every corner of the world.
  • South Korea's new leader is coming to Washington on a visit aimed at reconciling differences with President Donald Trump. President Moon Jae-in (MOON JAAH IHN) won election last month. He's advocated a softer approach to North Korea and delaying U.S. plans for the full deployment of a missile defense system in South Korea. His conservative predecessor — who'd taken a hard line on the North, like Trump — was impeached in a bribery scandal. Moon has long favored engaging North Korea despite the North's rapidly advancing nuclear capability. The North's rapid tempo of missile tests has continued on Moon's watch. Moon's first stop in Washington will be to honor Marines who fought in the Korean War. He meets Trump for dinner on Thursday night and for talks Friday.
  • Actor Johnny Galecki, star of the TV series “Big Bang Theory,” has lost his large ranch home to a California wildfire burning in San Luis Obispo, about halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. >> Read more trending news The actor was not at the home at the time of the fire Monday night and is fine, Variety reported. “My heart goes out to all in the area who are also experiencing loss from this vicious fire, the threat of which we live with constantly, which may seem crazy to some but we do so because living in our beautiful, rural area makes it worthwhile,” Galecki said in a statement to TMZ.  >> Related: ‘John Wick’ villain Michael Nyqvist loses battle with lung cancer The fire, which is about 60 percent contained, has burned more than 1,600 acres and forced dozens of evacuations.  
  • Kremlin leaders are convinced America is intent on regime change in Russia, a fear that is feeding rising tension and military competition between the former Cold War foes, the Pentagon's intelligence arm has assessed. The unclassified report by the Defense Intelligence Agency, which will be publicly released later Wednesday, portrays Russia as increasingly wary of the United States. It cites Moscow's 'deep and abiding distrust of U.S. efforts to promote democracy around the world and what it perceives as a U.S. campaign to impose a single set of global values.' 'The Kremlin is convinced the United States is laying the groundwork for regime change in Russia, a conviction further reinforced by the events in Ukraine,' the report says, referencing the claims by President Vladimir Putin's government that the U.S. engineered the popular uprising that ousted Ukraine's Russia-friendly president, Viktor Yanukovich, in 2014. Russia responded by annexing Ukraine's Crimea region and supporting pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine. 'Moscow worries that U.S. attempts to dictate a set of acceptable international norms threatens the foundations of Kremlin power by giving license for foreign meddling in Russia's internal affairs,' the report says. Titled 'Russia Military Power,' it is the agency's first such unclassified assessment in more than two decades. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the report in advance of its public release. It harkens to Cold War days when the intelligence agency published a series of 'Soviet Military Power' studies that defined the contours of the superpower rivalry. Those reports ended with the 1991 demise of the Soviet Union. Now they return, DIA's director, Marine Lt. Gen. Vincent R. Stewart, says, with an eye on the future of U.S.-Russian relations. 'Within the next decade, an even more confident and capable Russia could emerge,' Stewart wrote in a preface to the report. No new, global ideological struggle akin to the Cold War is forecast, but the report cautions that Moscow 'intends to use its military to promote stability on its own terms.' During President Barack Obama's eight years in office, the U.S.-Russian relationship deteriorated from an initial 'reset' to American allegations that Moscow meddled in the 2016 presidential election to aid Donald Trump's victory. In between, were intense disagreements over Ukraine and Syria, where Russia has provided military help to President Bashar Assad's government and the U.S. has backed anti-Assad rebels. While Trump's campaign rhetoric was widely seen as sympathetic to Russia, ties have not improved in his first six months of his presidency. In April, Trump said U.S.-Russian relations 'may be at an all-time low.' Trump is expected to meet Putin for the first time at an international summit in Germany next week. Thursday's report, prepared long before Trump's election, reflects the Pentagon's view of the global security picture shifting after nearly two decades of heavy American focus on countering terrorism and fighting relatively small-scale wars across the Middle East. Russia, in particular, is now at the center of the national security debate in Congress, fed by political divisions over how to deal with Putin and whether his military buildup, perceived threats against NATO and alleged election interference call for a new U.S. approach. Rep. Adam Smith, the House Armed Services Committee's top Democrat, issued Wednesday a 'national security manifesto' on Russia. He and a group of lawmakers writing in Time magazine cited the threat of 'Putinism,' which they termed 'a philosophy of dictatorship' that seeks to extinguish democratic ideals such as government transparency by exploiting 'discontented facets of democratic polities worldwide.' At a Senate intelligence committee hearing Wednesday, Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, the panel's ranking Democrat, said Russia is becoming more brazen. 'Russia's goal is to sow chaos and confusion — to fuel internal disagreements and to undermine democracies whenever possible, and to cast doubt on the democratic process wherever it exists,' Warner said. Jim Kudla, a DIA spokesman, said his agency's report is unconnected to any recent events. It wasn't requested by Congress. The 116-page document offers a deep assessment of every dimension of Russian military power. It contains no new disclosures of military capability but portrays Russia as methodically and successfully rebuilding an army, navy and air force that weakened after the Soviet Union collapsed. 'The Russian military today is on the rise — not as the same Soviet force that faced the West in the Cold War, dependent on large units with heavy equipment,' the report says. It describes Russia's new military 'as a smaller, more mobile, balanced force rapidly becoming capable of conducting the full range of modern warfare.' It cites the example of Moscow's 2015 military intervention in Syria. The Kremlin cast the effort as designed to combat Islamic State fighters. Washington saw Moscow largely propping up Assad by providing air support for the Syrian army's offensive against opposition forces. The report says the Syria intervention is intended also to eliminate jihadist elements that originated on the former Soviet Union's territory to prevent them from returning home and threatening Russia. In any case, the report credits the intervention for having 'changed the entire dynamic of the conflict, bolstering the Assad regime and ensuring that no resolution to the conflict is possible without Moscow's agreement.' 'Nevertheless, these actions also belie a deeply entrenched sense of insecurity regarding a United States that Moscow believes is intent on undermining Russia at home and abroad,' the report says.
  • There could be a reconciliation in the future for Carmelo and La La Anthony. E! News reported that the actress appeared on “The Wendy Williams Show” on Tuesday and dished about the status of her relationship with estranged NBA player husband Carmelo Anthony. >> Read more trending news When asked if they were divorcing, Anthony, 38, responded, “Not right now,” and added, “You know, marriages are tough, and you know that. We all know that. It’s filled with ups and downs. We are just going through a time right now. “Him and I are the best of friends, and our No. 1 commitment is to our son, Kiyan, and we have to set an example for Kiyan, and that’s what’s most important to me.” She also said that even though things are tough between them, she will never have a bad thing to say about Carmelo Anthony, 33. Related: Report: NY Knicks Carmelo Anthony, TV personality La La Anthony separated “That’s my son’s father, and he is an amazing dad,” she said. “I could not ask for a better dad.” Host Wendy Williams couldn’t sit through the mystery of their relationship and decided to get to the thought on everyone’s minds. “He seems to want you back,” Williams said. Anthony responded, “Why wouldn’t he?”  Despite knowing that they aren’t divorcing just yet, Anthony is still uncertain about the future. Related: This celebrity’s baby is the taking over Instagram with all of these adorable posts and we can’t get enough “Listen, if I could predict the future, we would all be multimillionaires,” she said. “I don’t know what the future holds. I just know that we are doing an incredible job again being parents to our son. We are the best of friends. I’ve been with Melo since he was 19 years old. You’re not with somebody that long, and it just goes out the window. I love him with all my heart, and we are the best of friends.” When Williams asked if she’s dating, Anthony said, “Yeah, I’m dating. I’m dating myself.” “I’m trying to get myself in order,” she said. “I'm in the gym every day. I'm eating right. I’m taking out all the bad stuff in my life and just really dating and focusing on myself, which is something women need to do more often, put ourselves first.” La La Anthony and Carmelo Anthony were married in 2010 after dating since 2003. Watch the interview on “Wendy” below.
  • The Latest on the Trump administration's revived travel ban for visitors from six mostly Muslim countries (all times local): 12:06 p.m. Senior officials from the departments of State, Justice and Homeland Security are finalizing criteria that visitors from six mostly Muslim must meet to avoid the Trump administration's revived travel ban. The White House deliberations come as U.S. embassies and consulates await instructions later Wednesday on how to implement this week's Supreme Court order that partially reinstated the ban after it was blocked by lower courts. The new measures are expected to be implemented Thursday. The justices' opinion exempts applicants from the ban if they can prove a 'bona fide relationship' with a U.S. person or entity. Government lawyers must determine how to define such a relationship. The court offered only broad guidelines — suggesting it would include a relative, job offer or invitation to lecture in the U.S.
  • The Latest on a guilty plea in Las Vegas by a man who admits trying to kill a mannequin that police posed as a sleeping homeless person (all times local): 11:45 a.m. A man facing eight to 20 years in a Nevada state prison after pleading guilty to trying to kill a mannequin that police posed as a sleeping homeless person will avoid charges in three similar downtown Las Vegas attacks. Shane Allen Schindler admitted Tuesday that he thought he was attacking a human when he used a heavy hammer to whack the blanket-covered head of the dummy early Feb. 22. The attack was caught on video and Schindler was arrested by police staked out in the area following fatal attacks Jan. 4 and Feb. 3 on two men who police say were apparently sleeping when they died. Schindler's plea agreement means he also will not be charged in a Nov. 30 attack on a homeless man who escaped with head injuries. Schindler's court-appointed lawyer, Ashley Sisolak, says the plea deal was in his best interest. ____ 8:45 a.m. A Nevada man has pleaded guilty to attempted murder in an unusual case where he is accused of trying to kill a mannequin that was staged as a homeless person. Police posed the mannequin near the scene of where two homeless people previously had been beat to death with a hammer. Soon after, the top suspect in the two killings, 30-year-old Shane Schindler, was caught on camera bashing the mannequin with a hammer. The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported (http://bit.ly/2shAc9J ) Tuesday that prosecutors dropped charges against Schindler in three other cases as part of his guilty plea. Schindler is expected to receive a sentence of eight to 20 years in prison. Schindler's attorney, Ashley Sisolak, says he is happy with the deal prosecutors were able to work out.
  • A pregnant Minnesota woman was arrested and charged on Wednesday with second-degree manslaughter after shooting and killing her boyfriend during a YouTube stunt gone wrong. >> Read more trending news According to the New York Daily News, MonaLisa Perez, 19, shot a .50 caliber gun at Pedro Ruiz III, 22, as he was holding a book up in front of his chest. The couple was filming a YouTube video in which they were trying to see whether a bullet would travel all the way through the book. It did. Perez’s bullet fatally struck Ruiz in the chest while their 3-year-old daughter watched. Following the tragic incident, Ruiz’s aunt, Claudia Ruiz, explained that it was part of a stunt the couple wanted to share on YouTube, where they had already posted videos of some of their other pranks. RELATED: Columbus Police plead with parents to lock up their guns after an 8 year-old is accidentally shot “They were in love. It was just a prank gone wrong,” she said, according to the Twin Cities Pioneer Press. “I wish they wouldn’t have done it. I wish he would’ve just done another prank. He was so young. He had so much going for himself.” According to Claudia Ruiz, the couple was hoping to gain additional followers and generate some online fame for themselves. “He told me he had an idea. I said, ‘Don’t do it, don’t do it. Why are you going to use a gun, why?'” she recalled of her nephew telling her about the stunt, the Star Tribune reported. “‘Because we want more viewers. We want to get famous.’” Perez is being held in jail and will appear in court by video this week.
  • A Pennsylvania woman is facing charges after police said she overdosed while seven months pregnant. >> Read more trending news Kasey Dischman, 30, overdosed in her East Butler home on Friday, days after getting out of jail for retail theft, authorities said. In order to try to save her baby, doctors had to deliver the girl by performing an emergency cesarean section. Pennsylvania State Police said they are charging Dischman, who is recovering in a hospital, with aggravated assault on an unborn child. Dischman’s baby is in critical condition and on life support. If the baby does not survive, police told said they plan to charge Dischman with homicide.
  • The United States will get hit again by Russian cyberattacks if the country doesn't pay closer attention and work more closely with European allies who are also victims, international elections experts warned on Wednesday. In testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, experts described extensive Russian interference in European elections and encouraged more awareness among the American of how Russians are trying to undermine U.S. candidates and faith in government. One witness, a former U.S. ambassador to NATO, criticized both former President Barack Obama and current President Donald Trump for not doing more to publicize the problem and combat it. 'I do think that it's time for Congress and not the president to lead the response to Russia's cyberattack on the United States,' said Nicholas Burns, who worked as NATO ambassador and undersecretary at the State Department under President George W. Bush. Burns criticized Obama for not doing more as it became apparent during last year's election that Russia was trying to interfere. But he had harsher words for Trump, saying he hadn't been skeptical enough of Russia's role in the election. 'If he continues to refuse to act, it's a dereliction of his most basic duty to protect the country,' Burns said. Russian officials have denied any meddling in the 2016 election. U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that President Vladimir Putin was responsible. Burns recommended that the United States work more closely with Europe to identify Russia's cyber disinformation — fake news spread through social media, for example — and share information in real time. He also recommended that U.S. print, radio and television networks find ways to quickly discredit those Russian efforts as they happen. Janis Sarts, director of the NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence, said 'society and its perceptions' are the main target of Russian influence operations, so popular awareness that they are happening is key. 'We have seen resilience levels raise instantly as society recognizes being targeted,' he said. All four witnesses — Burns, Sarts, Ambassador Vesko Garcevic of Boston University and Dr. Constanze Stelzenmueller of The Brookings Institution — said they believe Putin is directly responsible for the efforts to influence the election. Senators expressed concerns that there would be more efforts to undermine next year's congressional elections, and committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., agreed the U.S. must 'lean on our allies' as those elections approach. 'We must advance more quickly than our adversary and only together can we do so,' Burr said. After the hearing, Burr said he'd like to finish the investigation into Russian meddling by the end of this year, but acknowledged 'that's aspirational right now.' Burr said the panel has an aggressive schedule in July, and may go into the August recess having done as many as 80 interviews. He also said the Senate panel doesn't have plans at this point to bring in longtime Trump confident Roger Stone for an interview. Stone is scheduled to appear before the House intelligence committee next month. 'We still have a very difficult time understanding whether he has anything to contribute to our investigation,' Burr said. Stone has said he communicated with Guccifer 2.0, an unnamed hacker who has taken credit for breaking into the servers at the Democratic National Committee. But Stone has denied that he worked with Russian officials to influence the presidential election. In a statement Tuesday, Stone's lawyer said the political operative has been 'much maligned by innuendo and misinformation' regarding the investigations into possible collusion between Trump's campaign and Russia. Lawyer Robert Buschel said Stone looks forward to providing the House panel 'a timeline based only on the facts.
  • A new, highly virulent strain of malicious software that is crippling computers globally appears to have been sown in Ukraine, where it badly hobbled much of the government and private sector on the eve of a holiday celebrating a post-Soviet constitution. The fresh cyber-assault Tuesday leveraged the same intrusion tool as a similar attack in May and proved again just how disruptive to daily life sophisticated cyber-assaults can be in this age of heavy reliance on computers. Hospitals, government offices and major multinationals were among the casualties of the ransomware payload, which locks up computer files with all-but-unbreakable encryption and then demands a ransom for its release. Ukraine and Russia appeared hardest hit. In the United States, it affected companies such as the drugmaker Merck and Mondelez International, the conglomerate of food brands such as Oreo and Nabisco. Multinationals, including the global law firm DLA Piper and Danish shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk, were also affected. The virus' pace appeared to slow by Wednesday, in part because the malware appeared to require direct contact between computer networks, a factor that may have limited its spread in regions with fewer connections to Ukraine.
  • Video of a Florida man’s “fishing first” has gone viral. The man, identified only as Joe, eyes a pair of snook in Tampa Bay from a balcony and decides to cast a lure out.  His first cast is unsuccessful, but he lands one of them on his second cast. The angler calls for a friend to run downstairs and out to reel the fish in.  He even tosses his pole down to the man before running down to take a picture with his catch. The snook was released back into the water. Tampa-based Salt Strong posted the video to YouTube earlier this week.   Within days the video had been viewed more than 40,000 times.   >>WATCH THE VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
  • A day after Republican leaders unexpectedly delayed action on a Senate health care bill, President Donald Trump pressed GOP Senators to get on board with the legislative effort, arguing that it’s time to on from the Obama health law. “Obamacare is dying, it’s essentially dead,” the President said in a photo op at the White House. “It’s been a headache for everybody, it’s been a nightmare for many,” the President added, as he made clear his desire for the GOP to reach an agreement that can get 50 votes in the Senate. Trump: It's 'very tough' to get the health care plan approved, but it would be 'far better than Obamacare' https://t.co/Q3WDqN4gCr — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) June 28, 2017 In his remarks, Mr. Trump sounded optimistic notes about getting Republicans to back a health care bill, saying several times that he had a good meeting on Tuesday with GOP Senators. “We’re working very hard, we’ve given ourselves a little more time to make it perfect,” the President said. But in the halls of Congress, there was no sense that the GOP was on the verge of a health care breakthrough, as Republicans staked out different points of view on what should change. In a letter to the President, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) set out four different changes to the legislation, again expressing his opposition to a new regime of tax credits that would be used to help people pay for health insurance. Paul also frowned on a late change in the bill, which would say that if you go more than nine weeks without health insurance, then insurance companies could force you to wait 6 months before letting you buy an insurance plan. Sen Rand Paul R-KY wants 'continuous coverage' plan out – says it's a 'Republican version of the individual mandate' pic.twitter.com/18eeSsqRvz — Jamie Dupree (@jamiedupree) June 28, 2017 Paul said that appears to be nothing more than a “Republican version of the individual mandate,” the Obama Administration plan that forced people to buy health insurance, under the threat of a tax penalty if they did not. Republicans are expected to go home tomorrow. Congress is not in session next week. Lawmakers would return to Washigton the week of July 10.
  • The Republican Party's long-promised repeal of 'Obamacare' stands in limbo after Senate GOP leaders, short of support, abruptly shelved a vote on legislation to fulfill the promise. The surprise development leaves the legislation's fate uncertain while raising new doubts about whether President Donald Trump will ever make good on his many promises to erase his predecessor's signature legislative achievement. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell announced the delay Tuesday after it became clear the votes weren't there to advance the legislation past key procedural hurdles. Trump immediately invited Senate Republicans to the White House, but the message he delivered to them before reporters were ushered out of the room was not entirely hopeful. 'This will be great if we get it done, and if we don't get it done it's just going to be something that we're not going to like, and that's OK and I understand that very well,' he told the senators, who surrounded him at tables arranged in a giant square in the East Room. Most wore grim expressions. In the private meeting that followed, said Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, the president spoke of 'the costs of failure, what it would mean to not get it done — the view that we would wind up in a situation where the markets will collapse and Republicans will be blamed for it and then potentially have to fight off an effort to expand to single payer at some point.' The bill has many critics and few outspoken fans on Capitol Hill, and prospects for changing that are uncertain. McConnell promised to revisit the legislation after Congress' July 4 recess. 'It's a big complicated subject, we've got a lot discussions going on, and we're still optimistic we're going to get there,' the Kentucky lawmaker said. But adjustments to placate conservatives, who want the legislation to be more stringent, only push away moderates who think its current limits — on Medicaid for example — are too strong. In the folksy analysis of John Cornyn of Texas, the Senate GOP vote-counter: 'Every time you get one bullfrog in the wheelbarrow, another one jumps out.' McConnell can lose only two senators from his 52-member caucus and still pass the bill, with Vice President Mike Pence to cast a tie-breaking vote. Democrats are opposed, as are most medical groups and the AARP, though the U.S. Chamber of Commerce supports the bill. A number of GOP governors oppose the legislation, especially in states that have expanded the Medicaid program for the poor under former President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Opposition from Nevada's popular Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval helped push GOP Sen. Dean Heller, who is vulnerable in next year's midterms, to denounce the legislation last Friday; Ohio's Republican Gov. John Kasich held an event at the National Press Club Tuesday to criticize it. The House went through its own struggles with its version of the bill, pulling it from the floor short of votes before reviving it and narrowly passing it in May. So it's quite possible that the Senate Republicans can rise from this week's setback. But McConnell is finding it difficult to satisfy demands from his diverse caucus. Conservatives like Rand Paul of Kentucky and Mike Lee of Utah argue that the legislation doesn't go far enough in repealing Obamacare. But moderates like Heller and Susan Collins of Maine criticize the bill as overly punitive in throwing people off insurance roles and limiting benefits paid by Medicaid, which has become the nation's biggest health care program, covering nursing home care for seniors as well as care for many poor Americans. GOP defections increased after the Congressional Budget Office said Monday the measure would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026 than Obama's 2010 statute. McConnell told senators he wanted them to agree to a final version of the bill before the end of this week so they could seek a new analysis by the budget office. He said that would give lawmakers time to finish when they return to the Capitol for a three-week stretch in July before Congress' summer break. The 22 million extra uninsured Americans are just 1 million fewer than the number the budget office estimated would become uninsured under the House version. Trump has called the House bill 'mean' and prodded senators to produce a package with more 'heart.' The Senate plan would end the tax penalty the law imposes on people who don't buy insurance, in effect erasing Obama's so-called individual mandate, and on larger businesses that don't offer coverage to workers. It would cut Medicaid, which provides health insurance to over 70 million poor and disabled people, by $772 billion through 2026 by capping its overall spending and phasing out Obama's expansion of the program. ___ Associated Press writers Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Ken Thomas, Andrew Taylor, Michael Biesecker and Julie Bykowicz contributed to this report.
  • Tulsa's 44th homicide victim has been identified. Tulsa police say the man who was shot to death outside of the Turley Food Express Monday night is 26-year old Denerrious Hopkins. A driver arrived on the store's parking lot, stepped out of his vehicle and opened fire, striking Hopkins five times. He died at the hospital. Witnesses were unable to identify the kind of car the shooter was driving, or any details about his appearance. If you can help with the investigation, call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.