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    Pope Francis is denouncing the 'inhuman' violence in Syria and is backing a U.N. Security Council-demanded cease-fire so food and medicine can reach desperate Syrians and the sick and wounded can be evacuated. Francis led thousands of people in St. Peter's Square in praying Sunday for an 'immediate' end to hostilities. He said: 'The month of February has been one of the most violent in seven years of conflict: hundreds, thousands of civilian victims, children, women and the elderly, hospitals have been hit, people can't get food. All this is inhuman.' He insisted: 'You can't fight evil with evil.' On Saturday, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved a resolution demanding a 30-day cease-fire across Syria to deliver humanitarian aid to millions and evacuate the critically ill and wounded.
  • Just when you got “Let It Go” out of your head, there’s a new “Frozen” song to check out. >> Watch the video here Mashable reported that “Monster,” the first original song from the “Frozen” Broadway musical, was released on Friday, along with a music video featuring Caissie Levy, who’ll play Elsa on stage, belting out the tune. The Broadway production of the beloved Disney movie will feature 12 new songs along with all the favorite tunes from the film. Just as they did for the movie, Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez have brought their magic to the play, writing all the songs. “Monster” comes into play during the second act when Elsa begins to wonder if she is a monster due to her magical abilities. Audience members also will get to hear several other new songs from Elsa, including “Dangerous to Dream.” Anna fans will be excited to hear that her character is getting her own new solo as well, “True Love,” and she’ll join Kristoff in a new duet called “What Do You Know About Love.” “It’s a moment of anxiety where the freedom she found in ‘Let It Go’ is shaken, and she hears in the distance the voices of the men coming for her, and she realizes now is the time she has to decide what her next move is,” Lopez said of “Monster,' according to the New York Times. >> Read more trending news  “It’s full of conflicting emotions,” Anderson-Lopez added. “It’s got fear. It’s got rage. It’s got her self-flagellation. It’s someone who has been living a double life of secrets and shame that no one knows about, and this is the moment of reckoning with all the destruction that she left behind her.” In addition to Levy, the “Frozen” cast includes Patti Murin as Anna, Jelani Alladin (Kristoff), Greg Hildreth (Olaf), John Riddle (Hans), Robert Creighton (Weselton), Kevin Del Aguila (Oaken), Timothy Hughes (Pabbie), Andrew Pirozzi (Sven), Audrey Bennett (Young Anna), Mattea Conforti (Young Anna), Brooklyn Nelson (Young Elsa), Ayla Schwartz (Young Elsa), Alyssa Fox (Elsa Standby), Aisha Jackson (Anna Standby), and Adam Jepsen (Sven Alternate). “Frozen” will make its debut at New York’s St. James Theatre on March 22.
  • The recent rain in Tulsa County has done more than just saturate the area. Drivers in Tulsa tell us they've noticed a lot more potholes pop up. “You almost have to dodge them a lot of times, which puts you in a lot of trouble getting in the way of other traffic,” one driver said.   Police in Broken Arrow report the same thing has happened along Lynn Lane. One resident states the problem has always been there, but now it's even worse. “It’s just really bad because of the rain,” that resident said.   She adds the new potholes have made her family’s daily drive a little more difficult. Let us know where the worst potholes can be found in Tulsa County.  
  • Chancellor Angela Merkel is preparing to name her ministerial team for a new German government, amid reports that she plans to promote an ambitious conservative critic. Merkel has signaled she will put fresh faces in her Cabinet after a coalition deal with the center-left Social Democrats, who won the powerful finance ministry, drew criticism. She pledged to name her Christian Democratic Union's proposed ministers Sunday, a day before a party congress considers the coalition accord. The deal must still be approved in a ballot of the Social Democrats' members to take effect. Much attention has focused on whether Merkel gives a Cabinet job to 37-year-old Jens Spahn, a leading advocate of a more conservative approach. The Bild am Sonntag newspaper and the news agency dpa reported she will name him health minister.
  • Parents in Nigeria have released a list of the 105 young women they say are still missing nearly a week after Boko Haram militants attacked a northern town, demanding that residents direct them toward the school for girls. The fate of the girls is not yet known, though many fear they have abducted as brides for the Boko Haram extremists, who in 2014 kidnapped 276 girls from a boarding school in Chibok and forced them to marry their captors. About 100 of the Chibok girls have never returned to their families nearly four years later. In the town of Dapchi in Nigeria's Yobe state, the militants arrived Monday evening, sending many fleeing into the surrounding bush amid the hail of gunfire. While Nigeria's president has called the disappearances a 'national disaster,' local officials at first falsely indicated that some had been rescued while others would return in the coming days from hiding. Yobe state Gov. Ibrahim Gaidam on Friday put the number of missing girls in Dapchi at 84, but family members quickly refuted that. Bashir Manzo, who has been heading up the relatives' efforts, said they only took information when a girl's mother or father appeared in person to report a missing child. His daughter Fatima is among those still unaccounted for. 'This list did not come from the school management or any government source but collated by us from the parents of the girls,' he said. 'As far as we are concerned, the governor is still being fed with fake information about these poor girls.' While it appears that many students at the school did go into hiding, Manzo said those children are now back with their families. 'All those that fled into the bush had been brought back to the school on Tuesday, and a roll call was taken after which they had all gone home to meet their parents,' he said. The Nigerian minister of information, Lai Muhammed, visited Dapchi on Thursday where he told the media that the government still needs 'some few days' to confirm the actual number of missing girls. Nigeria's president has said no effort will be spared to locate them. 'The entire country stands as one with the girls' families, the government and the people of Yobe State. This is a national disaster. We are sorry that this could have happened and share your pain. We pray that our gallant armed forces will locate and safely return your missing family members,' President Muhammadu Buhari said earlier in the week. He said the government was sending more troops and surveillance aircraft to the area to help the search. ___ Associated Press writer Krista Larson in Dakar, Senegal, contributed to this report.
  • We have updated information regarding an officer-involved fatal shooting in Tulsa back on Christmas Day. Tulsa World reports prosecutors recently decided not to file charges against Officer Jairo Calle. The scene happened on South Wheeling Avenue.  Jacob Craig apparently “went bananas” and pointed a gun at Calle. On Friday, Criag's mother spoke with the newspaper. She says her son had a history of mental illness and Calle “failed in numerous ways to save my son.” Do you believe it’s the right decision not to charge the officer?  Let us know in the comments.  
  • British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn is facing increasing pressure to change the party's Brexit stance ahead of a key speech on Britain's plan to leave the European Union. More than 80 senior Labour Party figures signed a statement published Sunday in The Observer calling for Britain to remain in the EU's single market and the customs union after Brexit. The letter states that Britain's economy would be so damaged by leaving the EU that Labour would be unable to carry out its reforms if it comes to power. It says: 'For the sake of building a better Britain and safeguarding those our party was founded to protect, we must grab this chance before it is too late. We will never be forgiven if we fail to do so.
  • On Saturday, dozens of people marched in downtown Tulsa to support people effected by the current DACA situation. For reference, the Obama-era policy protects those who were brought into the U.S. illegally as children. We spoke to Rosa Hernandez, who has renewed DACA protection.  Still, she’s fighting for those who do not.   “We’re just really tired of being dismissed because a lot of us don’t have citizenship or don’t have residency,” Hernandez said.  “We are a very vital part of the community.” Congress has not yet come up with a permanent plan, despite President Trump setting a March 5 deadline for protections to end. Do you think anything will get done in congress involving DACA?  Let us know in the comments.  
  • Icelandic lawmakers are considering a law that would ban the circumcision of boys for non-medical reasons, making it the first European country to do so. Some religious leaders in Iceland and across Europe have called the bill an attack on religious freedom. It is seen as a particular threat by Jews and Muslims who traditionally embrace the practice. Under the proposed law, the circumcision of boys — removing the foreskin of the penis, usually when the child is a newborn — would be viewed as equal to female genital mutilation and punishable by up to six years in prison. 'This is fundamentally about not causing unnecessary harm to a child,' said Silja Dogg Gunnarsdottir, lawmaker for the centrist Progressive Party, who introduced the bill this month. The proposed law calls circumcision a violation of human rights 'since boys are not able to give an informed consent of an irreversible physical intervention.' Circumcision is not common in Iceland, a small Atlantic Ocean island nation of 340,000 people that is overwhelmingly Lutheran or atheist, with an estimated 100 to 200 Jews and about 1,100 practicing Muslims. The bill has eight co-sponsors but is considered unlikely to get a majority in the 63-seat Iceland parliament. It does not have the formal backing of any government ministers but has drawn the support of 422 Icelandic doctors who favor outlawing the 4,000-year-old religious practice. They issued a joint statement Wednesday saying circumcision violates the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and also the physicians' Hippocratic Oath that says: 'First, do no harm.' 'In Western societies, circumcision of healthy boys has no significant health benefits,' the doctors' statement read, citing a 2013 paper in the American Academy of Pediatrics journal. The American academy itself says the health benefits of the practice outweigh the risks but not by enough to recommend universal male circumcision. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says doctors should educate infant boys' parents about the health benefits of circumcision, which it says reduces the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. Physician Eyjolfur Thorkelsson said the 422 signatures (a quarter of the country's practicing physicians, based on numbers from the Icelandic Medical Association) were collected in just 48 hours. Since 2006, only 21 boys under the age of 18 have been circumcised at Icelandic hospitals or private clinics, according to Iceland's Directorate of Health. The agency could not say how many were for religious reasons. Thorkelsson said the surgical procedure is painful, and its possible complications are well known to Icelandic doctors since most go abroad for training at hospitals in northern Europe or the United States where circumcision is more common. 'For many doctors, it's an uncomfortable request from parents,' he said. This view is not accepted in Jewish and Muslim communities. During Friday services at a prayer space above a home goods store, Imam Salmann Tamimi warned his multinational congregation about the proposed law. 'Circumcision is harmless if it's done at a hospital,' he said. 'This bill is appealing to people's emotion, not evidence.' He said circumcision was important to Muslims but even more so to Jews. 'This is an attack on all religion and especially Judaism,' he said. Rabbi Avi Feldman of the Chabad Jewish Center, who last month became Iceland's first permanent rabbi since World War II, says he hopes the bill does not become law. In a statement to the AP, he said circumcision is a core Jewish practice that serves as a bedrock of Jewish life. He was hopeful that the 'rights for people of all faiths will be preserved and respected.' Parliament is to continue the first reading of the bill in the next week. Legislator Gunnarsdottir said many male 'victims' of circumcision had reached out to share their stories and seek support since she introduced the bill. 'It's important for us as a society to discuss this,' she said. 'The experience of many men who have had this done to their body without consent confirms that.
  • No injuries were reported following a vehicle crashing into a Tulsa Cici's Pizza Saturday night. The collision happened at the location near 21st and Garnett. Police at the scene report it doesn't appear alcohol or drugs were involved. Instead, investigators believe the truck had a mechanical issue. KRMG's told there were employees and customers inside the restaurant at the time of the crash. So far, no damage estimates have been released.  
  • The recent rain in Tulsa County has done more than just saturate the area. Drivers in Tulsa tell us they've noticed a lot more potholes pop up. “You almost have to dodge them a lot of times, which puts you in a lot of trouble getting in the way of other traffic,” one driver said.   Police in Broken Arrow report the same thing has happened along Lynn Lane. One resident states the problem has always been there, but now it's even worse. “It’s just really bad because of the rain,” that resident said.   She adds the new potholes have made her family’s daily drive a little more difficult. Let us know where the worst potholes can be found in Tulsa County.  
  • The ground will be a bit soggy, but today should be perfect for outdoor activities. National Weather Service says the recent rain will move out of the Tulsa area. “Sunday will be mostly sunny with highs in the lower 60”s,” NWS said.   Conditions will remain dry Sunday night.  NWS is reporting mostly clear skies and a low around 30 degrees.   There is some good news weather wise for the upcoming work week.  The Tulsa area should see highs in the 60’s through Thursday.  
  • Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee on Saturday released their redacted response to a Republican memo on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, as Democrats charged that the GOP omitted numerous details about the FBI’s probe during the campaign for the White House. “FBI and DOJ officials did not “abuse” the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) process, omit material information, or subvert this vital tool to spy on the Trump campaign,” the Democratic memo states. “The FBI supplied information to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that Russia might be colluding with Trump campaign associates,” Democrats said in a press statement announcing the release of the memo, which had been held back earlier this month after the White House raised questions about details included in the ten page memo. “Some time ago, Republicans on our committee released a declassified memo that omitted and distorted key facts in order to mislead the public and impugn the integrity of the FBI,” said Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence panel. “We can now tell you what they left out,” Schiff added. BREAKING: Congress releases redacted Democratic memo pushing back on GOP claims of surveillance abuses in FBI's Russia probe. — AP Politics (@AP_Politics) February 24, 2018 Democrats said their rebuttal “should put to rest any concerns that the American people might have as to the conduct of the FBI, the Justice Department and the FISC,” as they said the evidence “failed to uncover any evidence of illegal, unethical, or unprofessional behavior by law enforcement.” Democrats not only countered that, but raised questions about the testimony of one-time Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page, who was the focus of the original Republican memo, as the GOP raised questions about how surveillance had been approved of Page. Democrats said the answer was not the information supplied by ex-British intelligence agent Christopher Steele. Some portions of the document on those points were blacked out, or redacted. You can read the full Democratic memo at this link. Democrats also released a fact sheet to go with the memo.
  • Local districts have been dealing with a lot of school threats recently. In fact, at least four children have been arrested. Tulsa County Assistant District Attorney Erik Grayless has a warning for anyone thinking about making a threat of their own. “If you threaten a school, we will prosecute you,” Grayless said.   The district attorney's office is so serious about these threats that Grayless was willing to get even more specific. “You cannot post pictures of firearms on Instagram and reference your school,” Grayless said.  “That’s a threat.  The threat itself, regardless of your intentions, is a crime.” KRMG's told that alone could lead to a misdemeanor charge and six months of jail time.
  • If you have outdoor plans for today be prepared to get wet. National Weather Service Meteorologist David Jankowski says more rain is likely for the Tulsa area. “Showers are expected to increase and becoming an 80 percent chance by the mid-morning hours,” Jankowski said.  “It looks like the rainfall forecast across the area for Saturday will be less than a half of an inch.” For reference, Tulsa saw 1.59 inches during the day on Friday.   The high for today will be around 58 degrees. Sunday will be a lot better for outdoor activities.  NWS is reporting sunny skies and a high close to 64 degrees.