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    Tulsa’s “basecamp for entrepreneurs,” 36 Degrees North, is now a boot camp for budding web developers, as the ribbon was cut Wednesday on the Coding Dojo. Located in major cities around the country, Coding Dojo chose Tulsa for its first campus in a mid-sized city. COO and CFO Jay Patel told KRMG that’s because Tulsa’s a hub for business in this part of the country, and his company sees a lot of potential here. “You look at large companies - not paying attention to tech at all - there’s many large companies in Tulsa,” Patel said. “And because of that, we realize there’s an opportunity for all of those companies to get tech talent.” Any business of almost any size needs that kind of talent in the modern business environment, he said, and Coding Dojo turns even people with no prior experience into fully capable coders in 14 weeks. Their graduates, he said, start at an annual salary averaging more than $72,000 a year. Gov. Mary Fallin attended the ribbon cutting, along with her entire cabinet. They held their monthly meeting at 36 Degrees North, and before the ribbon-cutting she spoke to the importance of bridging what is called the “skills gap” in Oklahoma. There are more jobs which require technical training and education than there are people to fill them, a problem that will only grow moving forward unless the state takes serious steps to address the issue. Coding Dojo answers that need in a direct way, she said. “We have to have a highly-skilled, relevant, educated work force,” she told KRMG. “So we’ve been talking a lot about what type of jobs we have, what type of skill sets are needed.” Classes at Coding Dojo will begin September 18th. Related Story: Coding Dojo Coming to Tulsa, Offering a New Career Path Related Story: Coding Dojo to Offer Full Java Course in Tulsa
  • The International Criminal court ruled Thursday that a Muslim radical found guilty of destroying World Heritage cultural sites in the Malian city of Timbuktu must pay 2.7 million euros ($3.2 million) in reparations. The court in the Netherlands found that Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi had damaged nine mausoleums and a mosque door in 2012, and caused economic losses and moral harm to victims — primarily the people of Timbuktu, who depend on tourism. At a previous hearing, Al Mahdi pleaded guilty and expressed remorse for his role in leading the destruction and urged Muslims around the world not to commit similar acts. Al Mahdi led pickax-wielding rebels who wrecked the simple mud-brick mausoleums covering the saints' tombs in June and July 2012 in the famed African city. The sites that were attacked — all but one of them on the World Heritage list — were built during the 15th and 16th centuries at a time when Timbuktu was considered a great center of Islamic learning. Prosecutors said Al Mahdi was a member of Ansar Dine, an Islamic extremist group with links to al-Qaida that held power in northern Mali at the time. The militants were driven out after nearly a year by French forces, and those troops arrested Al Mahdi in neighboring Niger in 2014. The court also ordered Al Mahdi to pay the symbolic sum of one euro ($1.13) to Mali and one euro to the international community via UNESCO, which is responsible for World Heritage site cultural listings. It called the reparations 'reasonable' and said the burden of paying would not make it impossible for him to reintegrate into society.
  • French authorities have detained a man linked to an Algerian driver who sped his car into a group of soldiers near Paris. It is the first arrest in the case. A judicial official said Thursday the man was arrested Wednesday and will be questioned by counterterrorism investigators. Police have been unable to question the chief suspect, Hamou Benlatreche, because he remains hospitalized with serious injuries sustained during his arrest, according to the official. The official was not authorized to be publicly named while speaking about an ongoing investigation. Police have not disclosed a motive for the Aug. 9 attack that injured six soldiers in the Paris suburb of Levallois-Perret. Police say Benlatreche, 37, was known to authorities as a suspect in minor crimes but not as someone with radical beliefs.
  • The Latest on White House strategist Steve Bannon (all times local): ___ 5:15 a.m. China has warned 'there is no winner in a trade war' after an aide to President Donald Trump advocated a tougher stance toward Beijing in published comments. A foreign ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, said Thursday both sides have benefited from trade. In comments to The American Prospect posted online, Trump's chief strategist, Steve Bannon, said the United States is in an 'economic war' with China. Asked about Bannon's comments, Hua said at a regular new briefing, 'There is no winner in a trade war. We hope the relevant people can refrain from dealing with a problem in the 21st century with a zero-sum mentality from the 19th or the 20th century.' Hua appealed for dialogue to 'preserve the sound and steady growth of China-U.S. relations.' ___ 3:26 a.m. President Donald Trump's chief strategist Steve Bannon says there's no military solution to the threat posed by North Korea and its nuclear ambitions, despite the president's recent pledge to answer further aggression with 'fire and fury.' In an interview with The American Prospect posted online Wednesday, Bannon tells the liberal publication that the U.S. is losing the economic race against China. He also talks about purging his rivals from the Defense and State departments. Bannon is also asked about the white supremacist movement, whose march on Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend led to deadly violence. He dismisses them as 'losers,' ''a fringe element' and 'a collection of clowns.' The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment. ___
  • China's government on Thursday warned 'there is no winner in a trade war' after an aide to President Donald Trump called in published comments for a tougher stance toward Beijing. A foreign ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, appealed for dialogue to preserve stable relations when asked about the comments by Trump's chief strategist, Steve Bannon. In comments to The American Prospect posted online, Bannon said the United States is in an 'economic war' with China. He recommended pursuing a trade investigation of Beijing's technology policies and anti-dumping action over Chinese exports of steel and aluminum. 'There is no winner in a trade war,' Hua said at a regular news briefing. 'We hope the relevant people can refrain from dealing with a problem in the 21st century with a zero-sum mentality from the 19th or the 20th century.' Hua appealed for dialogue to 'preserve the sound and steady growth of China-U.S. relations.' On Monday, Trump instructed U.S. trade officials to look into whether to launch a formal investigation into whether Beijing improperly requires foreign companies to hand over technology as a condition of market access. The Chinese government criticized that as a violation of the spirit of global trade rules. It warned it will take 'all appropriate measures' if Chinese companies are hurt.
  • Austrian police say a toddler has been found dead after being left in a car for several hours in during high temperatures. Police official Rainer Fritz says the 19-month boy was found by her 17-year-old mother and her boyfriend. He says the two say they left the child in the vehicle in the western city of Bludenz with temperatures at around 30 degrees Celsius (86 Fahrenheit) because they did not want to wake him. Fritz told state broadcaster ORF Thursday that the toddler is being autopsied. If he is found to have died because of the heat, his mother and her boyfriend face manslaughter charges.
  • Dutch police quickly arrested a man armed with a knife who briefly held a woman hostage Thursday at a radio station building in the Netherlands. The woman was shocked but otherwise unhurt in the early morning incident in Hilversum, southeast of Amsterdam, said Ellen Deheer, a police spokeswoman for the Middle Netherlands region. The man's identity and motives weren't immediately clear, she said. 'We will talk to him about what his reasons were to take this woman as a hostage,' Deheer said. 'She is shocked at this moment. It will take some time to talk to her about this.' The man threatened the woman with a knife outside the building and forced her inside, according to another police media officer, Leonie Bosselaar. After sealing off the area, police 'decided to end the situation' two hours later, entering the building, arresting the man and rescuing the woman, said Deheer.
  • The Latest on Uganda reaching 1 million refugees from South Sudan (all times local): 12 p.m. The number of South Sudanese refugees sheltering in Uganda has reached 1 million, the United Nations said Thursday, a grim milestone for what has become the world's fastest-growing refugee crisis. Ugandan officials say they are overwhelmed by the flow of people fleeing South Sudan's civil war and the U.N. refugee agency urges the international community to donate more for humanitarian assistance. An average of 1,800 South Sudanese citizens have been arriving daily in Uganda over the past 12 months, the UNHCR said in a statement. Another 1 million or more South Sudanese are sheltering in Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Congo and Central African Republic. The number of people fleeing jumped after deadly fighting again erupted in South Sudan's capital, Juba, in July 2016. 'Recent arrivals continue to speak of barbaric violence, with armed groups reportedly burning down houses with civilians inside, people being killed in front of family members, sexual assaults of women and girls and kidnapping of boys for forced conscription,' the statement said. 'With refugees still arriving in their thousands, the amount of aid we are able to deliver is increasingly falling short.' A fundraising summit hosted by Uganda in June raised only a fraction of the $2 billion that Ugandan officials have said is needed to sufficiently look after the refugees and the communities hosting them. 'This unhappy 1-million milestone must serve as a wake-up call to the international community that much more is needed from them,' Sarah Jackson, an Amnesty International official in the region, said in a statement Thursday. 'With no resolution to the conflict in South Sudan in sight, refugees will continue to flee to Uganda and the humanitarian crisis will only escalate.' Most of the refugees are women and children fleeing violence, often along ethnic lines, since the world's newest country erupted into violence in December 2013. Ugandan refugee officials have repeatedly warned the influx is straining the country's ability to be generous to the refugees, who often are given small plots of land for building temporary shelters and planting crops when they arrive. The largest of the settlements hosting refugees from South Sudan, Bidi Bidi, is roughly 230 square kilometers (88.8 sq. miles). ___ Associated Press journalist Rodney Muhumuza in Kampala, Uganda, contributed to this report.
  • A multi-agency team scoured the ocean off Hawaii for five soldiers aboard an Army helicopter that went down during a nighttime training exercise. The UH-60 Black Hawk went missing when another Army helicopter training with it lost visual and radio contact about 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, said Lt. Col. Curtis Kellogg, a spokesman for the 25th Infantry Division. Two pilots and three crew members were on board, he said. The Army has notified the soldiers' families, Kellogg said. 'As we do this work, the soldiers and their families are in the forefront of our minds. That's what we're doing this for,' Kellogg said. Honolulu Fire Department search and rescue crews found and collected pieces of helicopter fuselage and a helmet in a debris field about 2 miles (3 kilometers) off Kaena Point on Oahu. Photos showed Army soldiers unloading suspected debris from the firefighters' boat and personal watercraft at the harbor in the nearby town of Haleiwa. The search later moved to an area about 5 miles (8 kilometers) offshore where currents moving in different directions converge. Officials closed the state park at Kaena Point while the search was underway. Kaena is a remote spot northwest of Honolulu where Oahu's northern and western coasts meet to form a small peninsula. The park's sandy coastline is home to a seabird colony and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. A Coast Guard plane, two helicopters and several boats were being used in the search. The Army and Marine Corps joined the effort, as did Honolulu firefighters and lifeguards. Two Black Hawk crews were conducting training between Kaena Point and Dillingham Airfield when communications were lost, officials said. Clouds and a few showers were in the area at the time. The soldiers were training at night to maintain the skills they need to do their jobs, Kellogg said. 'Our aviation assets, as well as all of our soldiers, train at night. It's what we do,' he said. They need these skills to accomplish their wartime mission, Kellogg said. The two helicopters are elements of the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade based in Hawaii. The UH-60 Black Hawk is a four-bladed, twin-engine utility helicopter manufactured for the Army by Sikorsky Aircraft starting in the 1970s. More than 3,000 Black Hawk aircraft are in service around the world, according to Sikorsky's parent company Lockheed Martin. The U.S. Army owns 2,300 of them. In April, one crew member was killed and two others were injured when an Army Black Hawk helicopter crashed onto a golf course in Maryland during a routine training flight. In 2015, 11 crew members were killed when an Army Black Hawk helicopter crashed into the water off Eglin Air Force Base in Florida.
  • A court on Thursday overturned sentences that the prosecution said were too light and sent young Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong and two other student leaders of huge pro-democracy protests in 2014 to prison. The three were immediately taken to serve their sentences of up to eight months. Wong pumped his fist in air as he walked out of the dock into custody. The three were found guilty of leading or encouraging an illegal rally in September 2014 that kicked off the demonstrations known as the 'Umbrella Movement.' Youthful activists brought major thoroughfares to a standstill for 11 weeks to protest Beijing's plan to restrict elections in the Chinese-ruled former British colony. Last year, a lower court sentenced Wong and Nathan Law, a student leader who was later elected to the legislature, to community service and gave a third activist, Alex Chow, a suspended three-week prison sentence. A three-judge panel on Thursday decided to stiffen those sentences following a prosecution request and send all three to prison. Law was sentenced to eight months, Chow to seven and Wong to six. Before their hearing, Wong, who became famous for his role in the protests because he was just 17 and still in high school at the time, was defiant in a speech to the media. 'People united will never be defeated,' Wong said outside the courthouse flanked by his co-convicted. He vowed they would continue 'this long battle' for freedom and democracy. 'Time is on our side and one day Hong Kong will be a place we can determine our own future. We love Hong Kong,' he said into a microphone as a rival, pro-Beijing protester chanted, also on a microphone, nearby. The appeal judges at the High Court had been expected to send them to prison, following their decision in a similar case this week involving 13 activists given eight to 13 months' jail time after their original community service sentences were overturned. Wong had been girding for such a possibility and tweeted to his followers that they shouldn't abandon the movement. 'When those of us who face jail time have yet to give up, how can the rest of you give up?' he wrote, and also tweeted that he promised to keep up with his studies. The case is the latest to raise fears that Hong Kong's independent judiciary is under threat as the city's Beijing-backed government uses the courts to clamp down on the opposition. Since legislative elections in September, the courts have disqualified from office half a dozen pro-democracy lawmakers, including Law, for having turned their oath-taking into apparent protests against Beijing. ___ Associated Press writer Louise Watt in Beijing contributed to this report.
  • Tulsa’s “basecamp for entrepreneurs,” 36 Degrees North, is now a boot camp for budding web developers, as the ribbon was cut Wednesday on the Coding Dojo. Located in major cities around the country, Coding Dojo chose Tulsa for its first campus in a mid-sized city. COO and CFO Jay Patel told KRMG that’s because Tulsa’s a hub for business in this part of the country, and his company sees a lot of potential here. “You look at large companies - not paying attention to tech at all - there’s many large companies in Tulsa,” Patel said. “And because of that, we realize there’s an opportunity for all of those companies to get tech talent.” Any business of almost any size needs that kind of talent in the modern business environment, he said, and Coding Dojo turns even people with no prior experience into fully capable coders in 14 weeks. Their graduates, he said, start at an annual salary averaging more than $72,000 a year. Gov. Mary Fallin attended the ribbon cutting, along with her entire cabinet. They held their monthly meeting at 36 Degrees North, and before the ribbon-cutting she spoke to the importance of bridging what is called the “skills gap” in Oklahoma. There are more jobs which require technical training and education than there are people to fill them, a problem that will only grow moving forward unless the state takes serious steps to address the issue. Coding Dojo answers that need in a direct way, she said. “We have to have a highly-skilled, relevant, educated work force,” she told KRMG. “So we’ve been talking a lot about what type of jobs we have, what type of skill sets are needed.” Classes at Coding Dojo will begin September 18th. Related Story: Coding Dojo Coming to Tulsa, Offering a New Career Path Related Story: Coding Dojo to Offer Full Java Course in Tulsa
  • Back to school time is a good time to remember safety. Safe Kids Tulsa has six safety tips. They say teach your kids early to put away their smart phone or tablet and look left, right, and left again when crossing streets. Tell them to stand three giant steps away from the curb when waiting for the bus and to board one at a time. If they carpool, make sure the car has the right safety seats for their age. Get the kids a medical check-up before they take part in sports. Remember to teach them to hydrate when they're playing. And check playground equipment for any dangerous defects.
  • Think you’re being nice when you add a smiley face to the end of your email? According to one study, you could be conveying something else.  >> Read more trending news  The new study, titled the “The Dark Side of a Smiley,” examines the “effects of smiling emoticons on virtual first impressions.” Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel found that, contrary to popular belief, virtual smiley faces are not a suitable replacement for an in-person smile. In fact, “smileys do not increase perceptions of warmth and actually decrease perceptions of competence,” the researchers found.  The study, which involved 549 participants from 29 countries, tested three experiments to gather findings.  One experiment revealed that when the gender of the email sender was unknown, recipients assumed it was a woman if the sender used a smiley face. This finding did not correlate with participants’ conclusions with friendliness or competence. Another experiment found that not only do recipients of professional emails with smiley faces generally view senders as less competent, they’re also less willing to share important information with the sender. When considering two emails that are exactly the same with the only difference being that one includes a smiley face, the one without the emoticon is more commonly effective. “The study ... found that when the participants were asked to respond to emails on formal matters, their answers were more detailed and they included more content-related information when the email did not include a smiley,” said Dr. Ella Glikson, a post-doctorate fellow at the BGU Department of Management, Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management. “We found that the perceptions of low competence if a smiley is included in turn undermined information sharing.” Although using smiley faces in professional emails could hinder communication in the workplace with new or unknown contacts and coworkers, the practice is more acceptable and less harmful when used with workplace buddies. “People tend to assume that a smiley is a virtual smile, but the findings of this study show that in the case of the workplace, at least as far as initial ‘encounters’ are concerned, this is incorrect,” Glikson said.  “For now, at least, a smiley can only replace a smile when you already know the other person. In initial interactions, it is better to avoid using smileys, regardless of age or gender.” The concise conclusion?  “In formal business emails, a smiley is not a smile,” Glikson said.
  • Tulsa’s Commemorative Air Force has posted an online auction for a chance to experience Monday’s eclipse from an airplane with an open cockpit. The minimum bid has been met, so the flight will happen August 21st. But Col. Phillip Kirk of the CAF tells KRMG if the winning bid is $2,500 or more, they will actually fly into the path of totality. “We will give that person an option to have us fly up to Missouri where they see the total eclipse, because that’s a lot of expense to get up there. If not, we’ll do it here for 90 percent (totality), and that will be a pretty good experience.” The flight will be in a PT-19 trainer, a 1942 aircraft fully restored and flown by the CAF out of Jones Riverside Airport. To enter the auction, visit the CAF Tulsa website. The deadline for entry is 10:00 p.m. (local time) Thursday. Kirk says they will provide eclipse glasses for use during the flight, and will carefully instruct the winner on exactly how to use them, and when. The plane will be flying at an altitude of roughly 8,000 feet, above most of the atmospheric haze, and offer a spectacular view of the eclipse. The CAF is a non-profit organization that restores and flies historic aircraft for educational purposes.
  • The doctor who operated on a Wisconsin man who accidentally shot himself with a nail gun says the nail punctured the patient's heart. Dr. Alexander Roitstein performed the surgery on Doug Bergeson at Aurora BayCare Medical Center in Green Bay in June. The doctor said Tuesday it was difficult to assess how deeply the nail penetrated, but said it left bruising and a hole. Roitstein said the nail was a fraction of an inch from a major artery. Bergeson was working on a house near Peshtigo in June when the incident happened. He told The Associated Press he initially thought the nail had nicked his chest until he tugged at his sweatshirt. Bergeson then got in his truck and drove to a hospital about 10 minutes away.