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    Asian stock markets were mostly higher Tuesday after Wall Street gained as investors looked ahead to this week's gathering of central bankers in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. KEEPING SCORE: The Shanghai Composite Index gained 0.2 percent to 3,292.30 points and Hong Kong's Hang Seng advanced 1 percent to 27,437.76. Seoul's Kospi added 0.4 percent to 2,364.57 while Tokyo's Nikkei 225 shed 0.1 percent to 19,379.75. Sydney's S&P-ASX 200 advanced 0.2 percent to 5,738.70 and India's Sensex gained just under 0.1 percent to 31,282.90. Benchmarks in Taiwan, New Zealand, Singapore and Bangkok rose while Malaysia and the Philippines declined. WALL STREET: The Standard & Poor's 500 index steadied following losses. Companies are mostly finished reporting quarterly results and profits and revenue were stronger than expected. The S&P 500 rose 0.1 percent to 2,428.37 after it and other indexes flipped between small gains and losses throughout the day. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 0.1 percent to 21,703.75 and the Nasdaq composite slipped 0.1 percent to 6,213.13. CENTRAL BANK WATCH: Investors looked ahead to this week's annual gathering of central bankers and economists in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and European Central Bank head Mario Draghi are both expected to speak at the event that begins Thursday. Stimulus from central banks has been one of the main reasons for the stock market's surge since the Great Recession. But the Federal Reserve is raising interest rates and preparing to pare back the vast trove of bonds it bought following the 2008 financial crisis. Investors are wondering when the European Central Bank may follow suit. ANALYST'S TAKE: 'Fed Chair Janet Yellen is likely to look past low inflation and Trump's credibility crisis, and remain resolute in normalizing monetary policy,' DBS Group said in a report. 'The Fed will be using Jackson Hole to set the stage to start unwinding its balance sheet in the coming months. ECB President Mario Draghi will probably be evasive about his central bank's strategy to exit stimulus.' KOREAS TENSIONS: U.S. and South Korean forces started annual joint military exercises on Monday. Tensions are higher than usual with North Korea, and Pyongyang in the past has responded to the drills with weapons tests and a string of belligerent rhetoric. ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude gained 17 cents to $47.70 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract lost $1.13 on Monday to close at $47.53. Brent crude, used to price international oils, rose 16 cents in London to $51.82. It shed $1.06 the previous session to $51.66. CURRENCY: The dollar gained to 109.21 yen from Monday's 108.97. The euro declined to $1.1808 from $1.1815.
  • ___ MILLER WATCH The Indians evaluate Andrew Miller after the star reliever aggravated the patellar tendinitis in his right knee Monday, knocking him out of a game just days after he returned from the disabled list for the same injury. Manager Terry Francona said it was likely that Miller will return to the DL, although the team was waiting to evaluate him a day after the flare up before making that call. 'Hope for the best and hope that it's not a big deal,' Miller said. 'It stinks missing any time.' POWER OUTAGE Right in the thick of a wide-open AL wild-card race, the Minnesota Twins will be without All-Star slugger Miguel Sano for a while. The third baseman was placed on the 10-day disabled list Monday with a stress reaction in his left shin bone. Sano was pulled from Saturday's game and sat out Sunday. He's batting .267 with 28 home runs and 77 RBIs in 111 games. To fill Sano's spot, first baseman Kennys Vargas was recalled from Triple-A Rochester for the fifth time this season. SERIES PREVIEW? The Nationals and Astros begin a three-game series between World Series contenders, although an October showdown would likely look much different. Washington stars Bryce Harper and Max Scherzer are on the disabled list, as is Houston shortstop Carlos Correa. Tanner Roark (9-8, 4.70) pitches the opener for the Nats against right-hander Charlie Morton (10-5, 3.69). ELBOW BLUES Steven Matz is expected to have another elbow operation in the next few days, ending a miserable season for the Mets left-hander. Matz was diagnosed Monday with irritation of the ulnar nerve in his left elbow, the team said. Surgery was recommended to reposition the nerve and relieve the irritation, a similar procedure to the one teammate Jacob deGrom had last year. Healthy this season, deGrom has bounced back to go 13-7 with a 3.49 ERA in 165 innings. Matz said his buddy told him the recovery and rehab is simple. GIOLITO'S TURN Hyped prospect Lucas Giolito will make his first big league start with the White Sox in a game against Minnesota. The right-hander came to Chicago in a trade for outfielder Adam Eaton last December and has been on a tear at Triple-A Charlotte, going 2-0 with a 1.53 ERA in three August starts. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • Three navies searched Southeast Asian waters for 10 missing U.S. sailors for a second day Tuesday as the Navy ordered a broad investigation into the performance and readiness of the Pacific-based 7th Fleet after the USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker collided east of Singapore. Aircraft from the amphibious assault ship USS America and ships and aircraft from the navies of Malaysia and Singapore were focusing their search east of the city-state where the two vessels collided around daybreak Monday at an approach to a busy shipping lane. The guided missile destroyer is now docked at Singapore's naval base and its crew is working on emptying compartments that flooded when the collision ruptured the McCain's hull at its waterline, the 7th Fleet said in a statement. Ship repair divers have also started assessments of the hull, the statement said. It was the second major collision in two months involving the 7th Fleet. Seven sailors died in June when the USS Fitzgerald and a container ship collided in waters off Japan. 'It is the second such incident in a very short period of time — inside of three months — and very similar as well,' Navy Adm. John Richardson, the chief of naval operations, told reporters at the Pentagon. 'It is the last of a series of incidents in the Pacific fleet in particular and that gives great cause for concern that there is something out there we are not getting at.' Richardson ordered a pause in operations for the next couple of days to allow fleet commanders to get together with leaders, sailors and command officials and identify any immediate steps that need to be taken to ensure safety. A broader U.S. Navy review will look at the 7th Fleet's performance, including personnel, navigation capabilities, maintenance, equipment, surface warfare training, munitions, certifications and how sailors move through their careers. Richardson said the review will be conducted with the help of the Navy's office of the inspector general, the safety center and private companies that make equipment used by sailors. There was no immediate explanation for the collision. Singapore, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, is one of the world's busiest ports and a U.S. ally, with its naval base regularly visited by American warships. There was no indication the collision was intentional or that cyber intrusion or sabotage had occurred but the review will consider all possibilities, Richardson said. The McCain had been heading to Singapore on a routine port visit after conducting a sensitive freedom-of-navigation operation last week by sailing near one of China's man-made islands in the South China Sea. The collision between the guided missile destroyer and the Alnic MC oil tanker ripped a gaping hole in the destroyer's hull on its port side aft, flooding adjacent compartments including crew berths, machinery and communications rooms. It happened about 4.5 nautical miles (8.3 kilometers) from Malaysia's coast but the McCain was able to sail on to Singapore's naval base. Malaysia's Maritime Enforcement Agency said the area is at the start of a designated sea lane for ships sailing into the busy Singapore Strait. Janes, a defense industry publication, estimated the hull breach was 3 meters (10 feet) wide. The 7th Fleet said damage control efforts prevented further flooding. Five injured sailors were taken to a hospital in Singapore for medical treatment. One of the injured sailors, Operations Specialist 2nd Class Navin Ramdhun, posted a Facebook message telling family and friends he was OK and needed surgery for an arm injury. He told The Associated Press in a message that he couldn't say what happened. 'I was actually sleeping at that time. Not entirely sure.' The Singapore government said no crew were injured on the Liberian-flagged Alnic, which sustained damage to a compartment at the starboard, or right, side at the front of the ship some 7 meters (23 feet) above its waterline. The ship had a partial load of fuel oil, according to the Greek owner of the tanker, Stealth Maritime Corp. S.A., but there were no reports of a spill. Several safety violations were recorded for the oil tanker at its last port inspection in July, one fire safety deficiency and two safety-of-navigation problems. The official database for ports in Asia doesn't go into details and the problems apparently were not serious enough for the tanker to be detained. The Navy last week said the Fitzgerald's captain was being relieved of his command and other sailors were being punished after poor seamanship and flaws in keeping watch were found to have contributed to its collision. An investigation into how and why the Fitzgerald collided with the other ship was not finished, but enough details were known to take those actions, the Navy said. The McCain, based at the 7th Fleet's home port of Yokosuka, Japan, was commissioned in 1994 and has a crew of 23 officers, 24 chief petty officers and 291 enlisted sailors, according the Navy's website. The destroyer is named for two decorated World War II admirals who were the father and grandfather of U.S. Sen. John McCain. ___ Baldor reported from Muscat, Oman. AP writers Stephen Wright in Bangkok, Robert Burns in Amman, Jordan, Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Deb Riechmann in Washington and Ali Kotarumalos in Jakarta, Indonesia, contributed to this report.
  • North Korea's military on Tuesday greeted the start of annual U.S.-South Korean military drills with its standard fiery threats, vowing 'merciless retaliation' for exercises Pyongyang claims are an invasion rehearsal. North Korea routinely issues such warlike rhetoric or conducts weapons tests to respond to the U.S.-South Korean exercises. Tuesday's threat came as top U.S. generals, including Adm. Harry Harris, the commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific, visited South Korea. Ties between the Koreas are almost always fraught, but anxiety is higher than normal following weeks of tit-for-tat threats between President Donald Trump and Pyongyang in the wake of the North's two intercontinental ballistic missile tests last month. The U.S. generals were to travel to the site of a contentious U.S. missile-defense system in South Korea later Tuesday. The North's military statement said it will launch an unspecified 'merciless retaliation and unsparing punishment' on the United States over the Ulchi Freedom Guardian drills that began Monday for an 11-day run. Despite the threat, an unprompted direct attack is extremely unlikely because the United States vastly outguns Pyongyang, which values the continuation of its dictatorship above all else. Impoverished North Korea hates the drills in part because they force it to respond with expensive military measures of its own. The North Korean statement accused the United States of deploying unspecified 'lethal' weapons for the drills that it says involve a 'beheading operation' training aimed at removing absolute ruler Kim Jong Un. 'No one can vouch that these huge forces concentrated in South Korea will not go over to an actual war action now that the military tensions have reached an extreme pitch in the Korean Peninsula,' the statement said. 'Moreover, high-ranking bosses of the U.S. imperialist aggressor forces flew into South Korea to hold a war confab. Such huddle is increasing the gravity of the situation.' Sen. Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat who visited Seoul with other lawmakers, said Tuesday that a dialogue would be the best way to defuse the North Korean nuclear standoff though he argues the United States and its allies must be ready to respond to potential aggression by North Korea with 'overwhelming force.' 'Talking with North Korea is not a concession, it is the only way to reach an agreement to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula and to reinforce that our military strength is there only to deter aggression and to defend against attack,' Markey told a news conference. Last month North Korea test-launched two ICBMs at highly lofted angles, and outside experts say those missiles can reach Alaska, Los Angeles or Chicago if fired at normal, flattened trajectories. Analysts say it will be only a matter of time for the North to achieve its long-stated goal of acquiring a nuclear missile that can strike anywhere in the United States. Earlier this month, Trump pledged to answer North Korean aggression with 'fire and fury' and later said a military solution was 'locked and loaded.' North Korea, for its part, threatened to launch missiles toward the American territory of Guam before Kim Jong Un said he would first watch how Washington acts before going ahead with the missile launch plan. The Ulchi drills are largely computer-simulated war games held every summer, and this year's exercise involves 17,500 American troops and 50,000 South Korean soldiers. No field training like live-fire exercises or tank maneuvering is involved in the Ulchi drills, in which alliance officers sit at computers to practice how they would engage in battles and hone their decision-making capabilities. The allies have said the drills are defensive in nature. __ Associated Press video journalist Chang Yong-jun contributed to this report.
  • An Australian military analyst says Trump's speech set a 'fairly low bar' in terms of success. Military strategist David Kilcullen told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. that Trump isn't seeking to promote democracy or counter corruption, but simply noted military outcomes he is trying to achieve. Kilcullen said: 'I think this is carefully shrouded in triumphalist rhetoric but it is actually quite a modest set of strategic goals.' Kilcullen said Trump's speech sounded as if it had been written by military officers working in the White House. Trump offered few specifics, such as whether more troops would be sent to Afghanistan. The president said the U.S. would shift away from a 'time-based' approach, instead linking its assistance to results on the ground. Kilcullen said Trump's speech focused on fighting terrorism, rather than fighting an insurgency, and that will require more use of lethal force and a restrained approach to nation-building and economic development. ___ A Taliban spokesman dismissed President Donald Trump's remarks on Afghanistan. Spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid told The Associated Press, 'The whole speech was old.' He said the Taliban will come out with a more detailed response, but he is initially calling Trump's policy outline 'unclear.' Last week the Taliban issued a 1,600-word open letter to Trump warning against a troop surge, saying it would prolong what is already the United States' longest war. Trump steered clear of discussing troop numbers, but said U.S. forces are in Afghanistan to win. The Taliban have also said they aren't ready for any peace talks, at least not until the U.S. and NATO give a time frame for withdrawal — something Trump says isn't going to happen.
  • Eleven members of the Browns knelt in protest during the national anthem before Monday night’s NFL preseason game between Cleveland and the New York Giants, the Plain Dealer reported.  >> Read more trending news According to the Plain Dealer, Those who took a knee were tight end Seth DeValve, running backs Duke Johnson Jr. and Terrence Magee, safeties Jabrill Peppers and Calvin Pryor, cornerback Jamar Taylor, wide receivers Kenny Britt and Ricardo Louis, linebackers Chris Kirksey and Jamie Collins, and running back Isaiah Crowell. DeValve became the first white player to kneel during the national anthem, CBS Sports reported. Standing with the group were punter Britton Colquitt, who had his hand on his heart; cornerback Jason McCourty; quarterback DeShone Kizer; defensive tackle Trevon Coley; and offensive tackle Shon Coleman, the Plain Dealer reported. The Browns improved to 2-0 in the preseason with a 10-6 victory in a nationally televised game. “As an organization, we have a profound respect for our country's national anthem, flag and the servicemen and servicewomen in the United States and abroad,' a Browns spokesman said in a statement at halftime. 'We feel it's important for our team to join in this great tradition and special moment of recognition, at the same time we also respect the great liberties afforded by our country, including the freedom of personal expression.” NFL players have continued the national anthem protests made prominent last season by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who was with the San Francisco 49ers and knelt during the anthem's performance before games.  This past week, Browns coach Hue Jackson defended his players’ rights to make a statement, provided it was peaceful and he had advance notice, ESPN reported.
  • Bill Cosby wants a judge to sign off on a swap that would give him a fresh new legal team ahead of his sexual assault retrial in Pennsylvania in November. Cosby is expected in court Tuesday morning in Norristown as the lawyers who fought to a deadlock in his June trial ask to be let off the case. A spokesman for the 80-year-old comedian Monday announced the hiring of a new team, which includes Tom Mesereau (MES'-eh-row), the high-profile attorney who won an acquittal in Michael Jackson's child molestation case. Cosby is being retried on charges that he drugged and molested Andrea Constand at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. He has said it was consensual. Mesereau didn't return a voicemail seeking comment. A district attorney spokeswoman declined to comment.
  • Colorado's largest city is on the brink of licensing some of the nation's first legal marijuana clubs. But Denver's elaborate hurdles for potential weed-friendly coffee shops and gathering places may mean the city gets few takers for the new licenses. Denver voters approved bring-your-own-pot clubs in a ballot measure last year after city officials' dragged their feet on calls to give legal pot smokers a place to use the drug. The city plans to start accepting applications by the end of the month. 'There are plenty of places where you can consume alcohol. Let's give people a place to go to consume marijuana,' said Jordan Person, head of Denver NORML, which advocates for pot-friendly public policy. But Denver's would-be 'social use' clubs have faced one delay after another. First, the state liquor board prohibited pot use at any place with a liquor license, making bars and many restaurants off-limits. And pot shops can't allow consumption on the premises. That left gathering places like coffee shops, art galleries and yoga studios. Furthermore, would-be clubs must stay twice as far as liquor stores from schools and anywhere children congregate, including playgrounds and sports fields. 'We can't be in places where it makes sense,' said Kayvan Khalatbari, a Denver marijuana consultant who helped run last year's club campaign. City officials say the rules are as flexible as possible given stiff resistance from some community groups and marijuana skeptics. The voter-approved club measure also says the club licenses are a pilot program and neighborhood groups must agree to allow a club before it could open. The voter-approved club measure also says the club licenses are a pilot program and neighborhood groups must agree to allow a club before it could open. 'There were no surprises in the rules,' said Dan Rowland, spokesman for the Denver department that regulates marijuana businesses. 'They reflect all the comments we got from the community.' One hopeful applicant says the regulations are stringent but still a step forward for the industry. 'A lot of us are hoping this will ... open the doors for a new kind of business,' said Connor Lux, who runs a co-work space for the cannabis industry and plans to apply for a social use license to hold public, weed-friendly events at his business just north of downtown Denver. Applying for a license costs $1,000; the licenses itself is $1,000 a year. Lux envisions open-to-the-public networking events at his space. 'I don't think anyone's planning a giant smoke-out, everybody-coming-to-get-high kind of thing,' he said. Khalatbari has sued Colorado's liquor regulators over the ban on pot and alcohol in the same location, a lawsuit that hasn't yet been heard, and says he is considering a lawsuit against the city for what he believes are onerous club rules. Khalatbari noted Denver has much looser distance requirements for places selling alcohol, even allowing bicycle bars to cruise past schools and churches. The mobile bars with drivers ferry groups of pedaling drinkers from one tavern to the next. 'You can ride these stupid moronic bike bars down the street, getting hammered in public. But we're not giving people a safer choice, even though voters have said over and over again they want to go that way,' Khalatbari said. Colorado's marijuana law neither allows nor denies pot clubs, leaving the state with a patchwork of local club rules. Some cities tolerate them; in others, clubs operate underground, with members arranging meetups using social media. State lawmakers earlier this year decided against a plan to regulate marijuana clubs statewide. Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper warned that passing the measure could invite a federal crackdown. The situation is similar in other legal-pot states. Alaska's 2014 marijuana measure allowed for on-site pot consumption at potential 'tasting rooms,' though regulators in that state have yet to allow any to open. And measures approved last year in California and Massachusetts allowed for pot clubs, but both states are still working out rules. Person, the marijuana activist, said she's hopeful that Denver's limited rules will prove a step forward in a national move toward marijuana acceptance. 'People still aren't sure how this is going to work or what's going to be allowed. But this is progress,' she said.
  • A massive ocean search for five soldiers who disappeared after a nighttime helicopter crash last week ended Monday after no signs of life were spotted among the debris. Crews from the Army, Coast Guard, Navy and local agencies in Hawaii searched around the clock as strong currents moved the wreckage into a deep-water search area that spanned 72,000 nautical miles (115,873 kilometers). 'Our five soldiers who represent the best and the brightest of America have not been found,' said Maj. Gen. Christopher Cavoli, commander of the 25th Infantry Division. The Army identified the missing soldiers as 1st Lt. Kathryn M. Bailey, 26, of Hope Mills, North Carolina; Chief Warrant Officer 3 Brian M. Woeber, 41, of Decatur, Alabama; Chief Warrant Officer 2 Stephen T. Cantrell, 32, of Wichita Falls, Texas; Staff Sgt. Abigail R. Milam, 33, of Jenkins, Kentucky; and Sgt. Michael L. Nelson, 30, of Antioch, Tennessee. Army and Coast Guard officials on Monday notified the families of the missing soldiers that they were ending the search and rescue operation, Cavoli said. 'It is a very, very difficult decision, and it weighs heavily, particularly on the hearts of the Coast Guard,' said Rear Adm. Vincent B. Atkins, commander of the U.S. Coast Guard's 14th District. 'We used all of our training and professionalism in this very dynamic environment to mount the best response possible,' Atkins added. There has been no determination yet of the crash's cause, Cavoli said after the search was suspended. Two Black Hawk helicopter crews were conducting training off the western tip of Oahu the night of Aug. 15 when one aircrew lost contact with the crew whose helicopter went missing. When the pilot on the lead helicopter realized the other aircraft was missing, he immediately turned his helicopter around and began to search, Cavoli said. But he later determined he didn't have the equipment he needed to launch a professional search so he alerted the Coast Guard, Cavoli said. A multi-agency team searched more than 72,000 nautical miles (115,873 kilometers) over the last week but saw no signs of life or of the crew that went missing. They found what appeared to be pieces of helicopter fuselage and a helmet in a debris field that expanded with strong currents to remote, deep areas of the ocean. The Navy brought in remotely operated underwater vehicles and sonar to help in the search and get a better picture of the ocean floor, which drops quickly off the coast of Oahu and is over 1,000 feet (305 meters) deep in parts of the search area. During the search, the Army and Coast Guard held joint briefings with family members every six hours to keep them informed, Cavoli said. The fact that parts of the fuselage were found indicated the helicopter's impact with the ocean was substantial, said Mario Vittone, a retired Coast Guardsman and expert on sea survival. 'There's not a big record of people surviving impacts with the water when the impact is so significant that the fuselage is torn apart,' he said. People can last about three days without water as long as they are not working very hard, but in the ocean it is difficult to get rest while trying to survive, Vittone said. All five crew members on board had life vests, air bottles for underwater breathing and radios with built-in GPS systems, the Army has said. 'All these things lead you to believe they didn't leave the aircraft, because if they could get out of the aircraft and inflate their floatation devices, then why would they not then turn on their beacons?' Vittone said.
  • A former member of a military-style Christian sect says that for years she's been trying to draw attention to the New Mexico group whose leader has been charged with dozens of counts of child sexual abuse. Maura Alana Schmierer told The Associated Press on Monday that she had been interviewed by investigators recently about the Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps. 'I've been trying to expose them for years,' said Schmierer, who left the sect in the late 1980s. A 2012 National Geographic Television show 'Escaped a Cult' documented Schmierer's experience with the sect. She said Deborah Green, who is a 'general' of the cult, ordered her to live in a shed with no toilet and with little food. Schmierer sued the sect for mistreatment and forcing her to give up legal custody of three of her children. A judge in 1989 awarded her $1.08 million. But the group fled California and later resurfaced near El Paso, Texas, and then in western New Mexico. Peter Green of the Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps in the remote community of Fence Lake faces 100 counts of criminal sexual penetration of a child, according to a criminal complaint filed Aug. 15. His exact relationship to the other Greens in the sect was unclear. Sect members Deborah Green, Joshua Green and Stacey Miller also face various charges ranging from child abuse, bribery and not reporting a birth. All four were arrested Sunday, KOAT-TV reported (https://goo.gl/Qtcsnr). Sheriff Tony Mace told the station that his office began investigating the group last year after two members claimed they had escaped the commune in the sparsely populated area of mostly ranchland. Those who escaped told deputies that Deborah Green and Stacey Miller allowed Miller's 12-year-old son to die of the flu in 2014, Mace said. Miller faces one count each of intentional abuse of a child age 12-18, bribery of a witness and not reporting a birth. In a statement, the group said the allegations 'are totally false' and similar to others the group has faced over the years. 'We don't know who all the accusers are, but the accusations are just re-runs of old lies that have been investigated and shown to be malicious attacks against a legitimate ministry, time and again,' the statement said. Deborah Green, and her husband, James, are the 'generals' who command their army to spread Christian ideals throughout the world, the group's website said. She faces one count of intentional child abuse resulting in death. Deborah Green also goes by the name Lila. Joshua Green, whose relationship to the other Greens was also unclear, is charged with not reporting the birth of his son to the state. The Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps describes itself as a group that is 'aggressive and revolutionary for Jesus' and provides a free spiritual 'ammo pack' to anyone who writes. Photos of members show them in military-style clothing and on missions in Africa. Its website is laced with anti-Semitic language and anti-gay tirades about same-sex marriage. The Southern Poverty Law Center lists the Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps as a hate group. The group has its origins in Sacramento, California, after Deborah and James Green founded 'Free Love Ministries' but garnered media attention for its unique beliefs and its communal houses. In 1986, a sect member died of malaria while on a mission in Malawi, sparking criticism of the sect from his family. New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department spokesman Henry Varela confirmed Monday that state officials are investigating a case involving the Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps in Fence Lake. But Varela said he couldn't discuss the details. ___ Associated Press writer Monika Mathur contributed to this report from Washington, D.C. ___ Follow Russell Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras
  • Going against his own gut feeling that he should pull military forces out of Afghanistan, President Donald Trump on Monday night vowed to intensify American actions against terrorists based in the region, though he gave few details on how U.S. policy would change or on how many more soldiers would be sent in, as the American presence in Afghanistan seems likely to continue, almost 16 years since the September 11 attacks that led to a lengthy U.S. intervention. “My original instinct was to pull out, and historically I like following my instincts, but all of my life I heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the Oval Office,” the President acknowledged in a speech from Fort Myer, located just across the Potomac River from the White House. “A hasty withdrawal would create a vacuum that terrorists – including ISIS and Al Qaeda – would instantly fill, just as happened before September 11th,” Mr Trump added. The President gave no details in his speech on his decision to reportedly send more troops to Afghanistan, though it would be nowhere near the levels the U.S. had in the immediate aftermath of the Nine Eleven attacks. Here is the President’s speech.
  • The sexual assault and murder of an 11-year-old girl near Shiprock, New Mexico, has reignited the debate. Ashlynne Mike's mother is urging the Navajo Nation to opt in to the death penalty, particularly for crimes that involve children. Southwestern tribe has long objected to putting people to death. The culture teaches that all life is precious. Tribes have been able to opt into the death penalty for certain federal crimes on tribal land for decades, but nearly all reject it. Legal experts say the decision goes back to culture and tradition, past treatment of American Indians and fairness in the justice system. One federally recognized tribe, the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, has opted in.  
  • Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes.  The sinking of the Indianapolis remains the Navy's single worst loss at sea. The fate of its crew - nearly 900 were killed, many by sharks, and just 316 survived - was one of the Pacific war's more horrible and fascinating tales.  The expedition crew of Research Vessel Petrel, which is owned by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it located the wreckage of the Indianapolis on the floor of the North Pacific Ocean, more than 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) below the surface, the U.S. Navy said in a news release Saturday. 'To be able to honor the brave men of the USS Indianapolis and their families through the discovery of a ship that played such a significant role in ending World War II is truly humbling,' Allen said in the news release. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945.  It sank in 12 minutes, killing about 300. Survivors were left in the water, most of them with only life jackets.  There was no time to send a distress signal, and four days passed before a bomber on routine patrol happened to spot the survivors in the water.  By the time rescuers arrived, a combination of exposure, dehydration, drowning and constant shark attacks had left only one-fourth of the ship's original number alive.
  • Monday marks the first time in nearly 100 years that a total solar eclipse will be visible from the continental U.S.  >> Read more trending news The 10 best locations to watch the eclipse across the country can be found here, but if getting to one of those cities isn’t possible, NASA is hosting two four-hour live-streams covering the event. NASA’s live coverage will begin at 11:45 a.m. ET.  Watch NASA’s live streams below. >> Solar eclipse 2017: What time does it start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it Debbie Lord contributed to this report.
  • The August 21 Great American Solar Eclipse will be the first total solar eclipse to stretch coast to coast in the continental United States in 99 years. Humans are expected to react with amazement when the thin path of totality, or total eclipse, passes through portions of 14 states, but what about their pets? RELATED: The ultimate guide to the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse this August Dogs and cats will be affected by the eclipse much less than wildlife, according to Russell McLendon, science editor for Mother Nature Network. But there are still important things to know about how the solar eclipse could affect dogs and cats, including safety measures responsible owners should take.  Here are five of the most important things to know about how the solar eclipse could affect your pet: Cats and dogs may not notice the solar eclipse much.  Many wild animals may mistake solar eclipses for twilight, McLendon wrote in MNN. Crickets and frogs may jump start their evening chorus, diurnal animals might quiet down and even nocturnal animals like bats and owls might be lured into activity in the eclipse's totality.  While they can't anticipate the eclipse phenomena like humans who read about it ahead of time, family pets are unlikely to have a primeval reaction to the eclipse like their wild animal relatives. They react differently, because their daily routines are influenced by human schedules as well as sunlight levels, McLendon reported. RELATED: Can’t find eclipse glasses anywhere? Make these DIY pinhole cameras, projectors instead Pets may still become fearful during the eclipse.  More than the darkness of the solar eclipse, pets may be apprehensive about the crowds that gather to view it, according to Lloyd Nelson, an Illinois animal-control officer interviewed by the Southern Illinoisan. Be aware that your dog or cat could get spooked by solar eclipse-inspired events that involve crowds of people, whether you take a pet with you to a viewing spot or it's near your home.  'It's sort of like the Fourth of July, but tripled,' said Nelson. 'We are going to have concerts, people shooting off fireworks in the dark of the midday sun, loud noises and strangers.'  Just as you do during firework holidays, make sure your pet is either safe inside for the eclipse or on a leash and under careful watch. Pets can suffer 'eclipse blindness.' One thing we do have in common with our pets is that human, canine and feline eyes can all suffer from 'eclipse blindness' when safe precautions are not taken during the eclipse viewing. During the eclipse, as the moon's shadow starts to block the sun's light, some of the sun's fiery disk will still be visible, according to LiveScience.com . A view of that light can literally burn any eyes, human or cat or dog, that look up at it.  RELATED: A solar eclipse can blind you — here’s how to stay safe during August’s Great American Eclipse The condition, commonly called 'eclipse blindness,' happens when the sun's powerful rays burn sensitive photoreceptor cells in the retina. It usually results in blurred vision and other vision loss instead of complete blindness, since humans and animals ordinarily turn away before complete blindness occurs. Pet's don't necessarily need glasses, but it wouldn't hurt. Space.com's safe viewing recommendations for humans include proper eye protection from NASA-approved eclipse glasses, along with strict warnings against trying to view the partial eclipse with a camera or telescope. Whether your dog or cat also needs the glasses is up for debate in the scientific community. Mike Reynolds, an astronomy professor at Floriday State College in Jacksonville, Florida, told LiveScience.com that it's best to outfit pets who will be out during the eclipse with protective glasses. Another expert quoted in the article wasn't as concerned. 'On a normal day, your pets don't try to look at the sun, and therefore don't damage their eyes,' said Angela Speck, director of astronomy and a professor of astrophysics at the University of Missouri. 'And on this day, they're not going to do it, either,' Animal lovers can help with worldwide research. While it's unlikely that your dog or cat will have a remarkable reaction to the Great American Eclipse, pet lovers might enjoy observing how animals in the wild or even the neighborhood do unusual things. Previous eclipses worldwide have involved reports of night birds singing, bats flying, spiders tearing down webs or owls calling, according to a report in the Southern Illinoisan. But because total solar eclipses are so infrequent, scientists have little beyond anecdotal evidence of animal behavior, Rebecca Johnson, citizen science research coordinator at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, told the paper. To remedy the dearth of research, the academy created a 'Life Responds' project where citizens all over the world download the iNaturalist app from Apple or Android platforms and document the plant and animal reactions they see during the eclipse. To join in the fun, download the iNaturalist app, make an account and practice making observations before the eclipse using the project 'Getting Started' guide.