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    TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Police escorted children to school Monday and a city bus changed up its usual route as a neighborhood near downtown Tampa feared a serial killer may be on the loose. In the last two weeks, three people have been shot to death within a 1-mile (1.6-kilometer) radius in the normally quiet Seminole Heights neighborhood. Police believe the shootings are linked by proximity and time frame, but they don't have a motive or a suspect. All three victims, who didn't know each other, rode the bus and were alone when they were shot on the street. None of the victims were robbed. 'I'm afraid,' said Maria Maldonado, who lives near the scene of two of the shootings that happened about 300 yards apart. The other was less than a mile away. Maldonado won't let her 7-year-old son play in the yard. 'We don't open the door or nothing. A lot of people are scared. I'm scared for my son, for the neighborhood,' she said. Seminole Heights is a working-class neighborhood northeast of downtown Tampa that's slowly becoming gentrified. Run-down homes sit next to renovated, historic bungalows, and trendy restaurants have sprung up near auto body shops. Residents and business owners say there are car burglaries and fights between kids, but they are not accustomed to anything like the violence that started Oct. 9. Business owners report a downturn in recent days, as worried residents stay inside. 'We don't know what's next,' said Majed Foqahaa, the owner of the M&M market. He said two of the victims would come into the store and buy soda and snacks. Foqahaa said he has a concealed carry permit for a handgun, and he keeps it at the store while he is working. When he walks out to his car at night, he holds it in his hand. Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn said the city has put dozens of officers in the area around the clock. The FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are also helping, he said. 'There aren't a lot of facts, or evidence, yet,' Buckhorn said as he visited a block where one victim was killed. 'But it's not for lack of Tampa Police Department trying. We literally have put bodies out here by the dozens. We're going to find this guy and we're not leaving this neighborhood till we do.' He was hesitant to use the word serial killer, but Tampa Police Chief Brian Dugan wasn't. 'We can call it what we want. If that brings attention to this. . That's fine,' he said. Police said 22-year-old Benjamin Mitchell was the first person killed on Oct. 9. Two days later, 32-year-old Monica Hoffa was killed in a vacant lot. Anthony Naiboa, 20, was shot and killed Oct. 19. Lula Mae Lewis, an 80-year-old woman who has lived in the area for 30 years, lives across the street from where Hoffa's body was found. 'I heard the shots that Wednesday night,' she said. 'But I was afraid to open my door because they were so loud, it sounded like it was just right here.' ___ Follow Tamara Lush on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamaralush
  • BEIRUT (AP) — The Latest on developments in Syria (all times local): 11:15 p.m. The Islamic State militants came into the Syrian town of Qaryatayn with a hit list. By the time they left three weeks later, more than 70 civilians had been killed — shot or beheaded, their bodies dumped in farms and ditches. The apparent revenge killings in the central Syrian town underscore the ability of the extremist group to inflict heavy losses even when it is in retreat. News of the gruesome slayings began to emerge late Sunday, after IS militants were driven out by advancing government troops. One former resident says his surviving family members walked for miles to find cell phone coverage so they could tell him of the deaths of his uncle, two cousins and a fourth relative. Another uncle remains missing. Abdullah AbdulKarim says the militants 'came into town with a hit list,' and that 35 of the 50 militants who overran the town late last month were originally from Qaryatayn. He said the militants accused many of their victims of collaborating with the government but many others were also caught in the revenge killing. ___ 6:45 p.m. Syrian officials and activists say the bodies of at least 67 civilians, many summarily killed by the Islamic State group, have been discovered in a central town in Syria that government forces retook from the extremists over the weekend. A senior Syrian official described the attack as a 'shocking massacre,' saying the search for and documentation of those killed in the town of Qaryatayn is still underway. Activists say some were shot in the street as IS militants retreated from the town because they were suspected of working with the government. At least 35 had been shot dead, their bodies dumped in a shaft. The militants have been retreating across northern and eastern Syria, days after having been defeated in Raqqa, the one-time 'capital' of the group's self-proclaimed caliphate. The killings raise the specter of more revenge attacks by the group while it fights to hang on to its last strongholds in Syria. ___ 2:30 p.m. Pro-government media is reporting that Syrian troops have taken up a position allowing them to fire down on a supply route between an Islamic State-held town on the Iraqi border and a nearby desert outpost. Pro-government forces are closing in on the frontier town of Boukamal, the last major IS stronghold in the country after the militants were driven from their de facto capital in the northern city of Raqqa as well as the eastern town of Mayadeen. The Central Military Media, a pro-military media outlet, said Monday Syrian troops and allied militias have encircled the T-2 pumping station in southern Deir el-Zour province following clashes with the militants. A race is underway between U.S.-backed Syrian forces and Russia-backed government troops in the oil-rich Deir el-Zour province. In a swift advance Sunday, U.S.-allied Syrian forces captured the country's largest oil field from IS. ___ 12:55 p.m. The spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State militants says contacts with Russia are underway to avoid friction on the ground between U.S.-allied fighters and Syrian troops backed by Moscow around Syria's largest oil field, coveted by both sides. Col. Ryan Dillon told The Associated Press on Monday that the coalition will continue to 'de-conflict' with the Russians, to ensure allied forces and the coalition air support can operate safely in and around the Al-Omar oil field. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces captured Al-Omar on Sunday, narrowly beating the Russia-backed Syrian troops who were also advancing toward it. Dillon says SDF fighters are fighting remaining IS militants in a housing complex adjacent to the oil field. He says the SDF will continue to secure key areas and will attack further into IS-held areas along the border with Iraq and in the oil-rich region of Deir el-Zour. ___ 12:30 p.m. A senior Syrian official says the killing of more than 60 civilians in a town taken back by government troops from Islamic State militants is a 'shocking massacre.' Talal Barazi, the governor of Homs province where the discovery was made, says the search and documentation of those killed in the town of Qaryatayn is still under way. Barazi told The Associated Press on Monday that most of the bodies were of townspeople who were government employees or were affiliated with Syria's ruling Baath party. Barazi says at least 13 residents remain missing while six bodies have not been identified. He says the killings went on for the three weeks that IS was in town and 'terrorized' its residents. Government forces regained control of Qaryatayn on Saturday. ___ 11:15 a.m. Syrian activists are reporting that at least 65 bodies of civilians have been found in a central town retaken by government forces from the Islamic State group. Most of the victims are believed to have been killed by IS. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says the number of those killed in Qaryatayn, in central Homs province, is likely to rise. The Observatory says most of the dead were killed during the militant group's three-week seizure of the town. Syrian troops and allied fighters regained control of the town on Saturday. The activist-run Palmyra Coordination Committee has published the names of the killed. It says at least 35 of the victims were found shot and their bodies dumped in a shaft. IS has suffered major setbacks in recent months.
  • Police say a 3-year-old boy from Arlington, Florida, who went missing Sunday while attending a birthday party with friends and family, was found hours later in an underground water-holding tank. >> Read more trending news Police said Amari Harley was reported missing around 4:45 p.m. Sunday after family searched for him when they could not locate him at a large family gathering at Bruce Park in Jacksonville, Florida. Investigators said they got a tip to check an underground water-holding tank inside the park, which they said is large enough for a small child to slip into.  Once the tank was drained, investigators located the body of a small child that matched the description of Amari. Police announced that the boy's body had been found around 8:45 p.m. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office continues to investigate the circumstances surrounding the death of the boy.  “During the short investigation, we have attempted to make contact with everyone that was at the park during the time Amari went missing. We have spoken to numerous witnesses that were present. However, due to the size of the park and the multiple events going on at the time, we believe there are others that may have pertinent information that could assist detectives in this case,” authorities said.  A spokesperson for Mayor Lenny Curry released a statement Monday saying the city is assisting in the investigation into Amari’s death. The city will be also be investigating how Amari got into the water tank, according to the spokesperson. “We are incredibly saddened by this tragedy. As JSO conducts its investigation, the city is assisting them by providing any information that will lead to a thorough and full review. The safety and security of visitors to city parks are paramount. The city will also be inspecting how this tragedy occurred, to ensure that all City parks are safe and secure,” the spokesperson said. Amari’s loved ones told Action News Jax that they don’t understand how he got inside a water tank at the park. City employees worked Monday to place new coverings on the tank. Read more at ActionNewsJax.com. 
  • WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S. general says the American people, including the families of the fallen soldiers in Niger, deserve answers about this month's deadly ambush. Gen. Joseph Dunford, the Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman, says the four U.S. special operations forces died Oct. 4 amid a 'complex situation' and a 'difficult firefight.' Dunford says American forces have been in Niger intermittently for more than two decades. Some 800 U.S. service members are supporting a French-led mission to defeat the Islamic State, al-Qaida and Boko Haram in West Africa. Dunford acknowledges many questions remain about what happened near Niger's Mali border. They include whether the U.S. had adequate intelligence and equipment for its operation, whether there a planning failure and why it took so long to recover one the bodies.
  • Amazon customers in Florida got a surprise when they opened the package that arrived on their doorstep. They ordered four plastic storage bins, but the containers came with 65 pounds of marijuana. “We love Amazon and do a lot of shopping on Amazon,” the customer told WFTV, who asked not to be identified for safety reasons. Photos: Couple get weed delivered with Amazon order When she and her fiancé needed to put some things in storage, they placed an order for 27-gallon storage totes. But when they arrived to their Orlando home, the couple knew something didn't feel right. 'They were extremely heavy, heavier than you would think from ordering four empty bins,” she said. >> Read more trending news  The marijuana was in boxes inside the totes and as soon as they opened the boxes, they were hit with a strong odor. 'When the first officer got here, she was in disbelief,” the customer said. Police seized the drugs and launched an investigation. It had been shipped by Amazon’s Warehouse Deals via UPS from a facility in Massachusetts. 'We were still pretty fearful our home would be broken into, and we didn't sleep there for a few days,” the customer said. The couple said that after going back and forth with Amazon mostly by email for more than a month, they never spoke to a supervisor. They eventually received an email giving them a $150 gift card with the message, 'I am unable to do anything else at this time.' The customers said what they wanted was an apology and an explanation about how this could happen. 'There was no concern for a customer's safety. I mean, this could have turned into a worst-case scenario,' one of the customers told WFTV. Orlando police said there have been no arrests, but they are still actively investigating the case. Amazon sent a statement saying its customer service team worked directly with the customer to address concerns and will work with law enforcement officials to investigate the case.
  • Two men are accused of pouring insecticide in the children's toy department of a Tennessee Walmart over the weekend, according to authorities. >> Read more trending news Millington police said the incident happened Sunday.  The men were seen on video 'vandalizing property and intentionally spilling insecticide chemicals in the children's toy department,' according to a news release. Officers said the men left the scene in a white pick-up truck that had two stripes down the center. Authorities continued to search for the men Monday.
  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Carlos Correa is such a fresh face, his first big league hit was assisted by technology. When he made his debut for Houston on June 8, 2015, Correa hit a three-hopper off White Sox ace Chris Sale and was called out by first base umpire Larry Vanover. About a minute later, a replay umpire in New York overruled the call , and the 20-year-old had an infield single and his first RBI. A new generation of ballplayers is featured in the World Series starting Tuesday night. Houston's dynamic infield duo of Correa and the diminutive Jose Altuve sparks the top offense in the major leagues. The tantalizing trio of Cody Bellinger, Corey Seager and Chris Taylor has the Los Angeles Dodgers in the Series for the first time since 1988. 'This whole season has been crazy,' Bellinger said. 'Honestly, I thought I was going to be a September call-up.' Altuve skipped Triple-A and made it to the major leagues on July 20, 2011, after Houston traded Jeff Keppinger to San Francisco. He singled off Washington's Tyler Clippard that night in his big league debut. Houston finished last in each of his first three seasons. Now Altuve is among four Astros remaining from the team that lost a club-record 111 games in 2013, joined by pitchers Dallas Keuchel and Brad Peacock along with utilityman Marwin Gonzalez. At 27, he's already a five-time All-Star and three-time batting champion. 'I'm coming from a team that lost a hundred games in a row three years, three straight years,' Altuve said. 'We made the playoffs in 2015. We didn't make it last year, and after last year we were a little uncomfortable because we were watching the playoff games from home.' Correa, the top pick in the 2012 amateur draft, was a first-time All-Star this season, hitting 24 homers and driving in 84 runs despite a torn ligament in his left thumb that needed surgery, causing him to miss 42 games. Bellinger, son of former Yankees infielder Clay Bellinger, started the season at Triple-A Oklahoma City and made his debut April 25 at San Francisco. He found out about his call-up at 2 a.m. after noticing he had four missed calls from Dodgers farm director Gabe Kapler. At 21, Bellinger became the youngest position player in Dodgers history selected for the All-Star Game, set a National League rookie record with 39 homers and had 97 RBIs in 132 games. Seager, at 23 the youngest of three brothers who played pro ball, was a unanimous pick as NL Rookie of the Year in 2016 and repeated as an All-Star this season. He became the first Dodgers player since Jackie Robinson in 1947-48 with 30 doubles or more in each of his first two seasons, and his 52 career home runs is already second-most among Dodgers shortstop behind Pee Wee Reese's 122. He missed the NL Championship Series after hurting his back on a slide into second base in Game 3 of the Division Series but is expected to be in the starting lineup for the opener against the Astros. Taylor blossomed at 27 after 2 1/2 unremarkable seasons with Seattle. Traded to the Dodgers in June 2016, he started the season at Triple-A, was called up April 19 and earned the leadoff spot in the batting order. He had three grand slams and finished with a .288 average, 21 homers, 72 RBIs and 17 steals. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is awarding the Medal of Honor to a retired army medic from Alabama who risked his life during the Vietnam War to help wounded comrades. Trump is giving the nation's highest military honor to retired Army Capt. Gary M. Rose of Huntsville during a White House ceremony. The White House says the 70-year-old Rose was serving as a medic with the 5th Special Forces Group in September 1970 when he risked his life numerous times to help others during combat. Rose will become the second person to receive the Medal of Honor from Trump.
  • INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Three Indiana pharmacists have been reprimanded by state regulators for trying to access Prince's medical records within days of the music superstar's death last year. The Indiana Board of Pharmacy issued letters of reprimand in the last three months and imposed penalties on the three after investigators with the state attorney general's office found they had tried separately to access Prince's medical records in April 2016 through a state database. Prince died April 21, 2016, of an accidental overdose of the painkiller fentanyl. All three pharmacists were found to have misused Indiana's online INSPECT database that pharmacists and physicians use to check controlled-substance prescription histories of patients. Officials found that the pharmacists entered Prince's legal name and date of birth into the database within nine days of his death to try to access his confidential records, even though they had not previously treated the musician who was from Minneapolis and lived in a suburb of that city. The board issued a final order on Oct. 12 for Indianapolis pharmacist Katrina A. Kalb for attempting to access Prince's medical records one day after his death. The panel did not fine her, but ordered her to complete 12 hours each of ethics education and community service. On Sept. 15, the board fined Selma, Indiana, pharmacist Kimberly M. Henson $1,000 and ordered her to complete 12 hours of ethics education. The board found that Henson had tried twice to access the musician's medical records. The board gave Crown Point pharmacist Michael Eltzroth the same punishment and fine as Henson on Aug. 8 for a single attempt to access Prince's records. The attorney general's office filed administrative complaints against the three in June and July, and the pharmacy board held its hearings after that. Attorney general's office spokesman Bill McCleery said complaints against medical professionals typically take the office between six and 12 months to investigate.
  • NEW ORLEANS (AP) — New Orleans celebrity chef John Besh stepped down from the restaurant group that bears his name after a newspaper reported that 25 women who are current or former employees of the business said they were victims of sexual harassment by male co-workers and bosses. New Orleans media outlets said Besh's departure from the business he co-owns was announced to employees Monday. The allegations were published Saturday by NOLA.comThe Times Picayune after an eight-month investigation. Women interviewed said male bosses in the Besh Restaurant Group touched or verbally harassed them and, in a few cases, tried to leverage positions of authority for sex. Besh acknowledged a sexual relationship with an employee, saying in a written statement to NOLA.comThe Times-Picayune that it was consensual, despite the woman's assertions in a complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that she felt pressured. The developments came as sexual harassment allegations have been dogging other famous men, including Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, former Fox News executive Roger Ailes and comedian Bill Cosby. Repercussions from the Besh story were being felt even before the allegations were published. Last month, Alon Shaya, a star chef who rose up through the Besh Group ranks, was dismissed as executive chef at Domenica, Pizza Domenica and his critically acclaimed namesake restaurant, Shaya. Shaya had contacted NOLA.com in August regarding his concerns on how sexual harassment allegations were handled. 'I do feel like I was fired for talking ... and for standing up,' Shaya said in a follow-up interview Oct. 17. Current and former staff, meanwhile, said in the article and in social media that Shaya did not do enough to stop sexual harassment at the restaurants he ran. On Sunday, Harrah's New Orleans Casino said it was severing ties with Besh and would rename its Besh Steak restaurant in the casino. Nine women interviewed for the NOLA.com story agreed to the use of their names, including Madie Robison. 'After being immersed in the culture of the company, I realize my morals and values do not align with the daily practices,' Robison wrote in a resignation email, sent to Besh, his business partner Octavio Mantilla and others. In multiple interviews, Robison's complaints included persistent, sexualized comments from peers and supervisors. Robison claimed she also endured the uninvited touching of Mantilla for almost the entirety of her two years at the Besh Group. Mantilla said he doesn't remember touching Robison. 'I don't remember touching her at all, not on intention or anything,' he said. A Besh Group spokesman said none of the thousands of current or former employees has ever filed an internal complaint alleging sexual harassment in the company's 12 years of existence. Besh and Mantilla said during an Oct. 16 interview that in the past the company had lacked a human resources department to process such claims. The company has one now - its first ever director of human resources took the job Oct. 11, the spokesman told NOLA.com. In his separate, written statement to NOLA.com, Besh said he was working to 'rebuild my marriage' and publicly apologized to employees 'who found my behavior as unacceptable as I do.' 'I alone am entirely responsible for my moral failings,' he added. 'This is not the way the head of a company like ours should have acted, let alone a husband and father.' Raymond Landry, an attorney for the restaurant group, gave the news outlet a written statement as well, not mentioning specific allegations, but saying the company is implementing a better procedure for receiving and dealing with complaints. 'While we've had a complaint procedure in place that complies with all existing laws, we now recognize that, as a practical matter, we needed to do more than what the law requires and we have revamped our training, education and procedures accordingly,' Landry's statement said.
  • Amazon customers in Florida got a surprise when they opened the package that arrived on their doorstep. They ordered four plastic storage bins, but the containers came with 65 pounds of marijuana. “We love Amazon and do a lot of shopping on Amazon,” the customer told WFTV, who asked not to be identified for safety reasons. Photos: Couple get weed delivered with Amazon order When she and her fiancé needed to put some things in storage, they placed an order for 27-gallon storage totes. But when they arrived to their Orlando home, the couple knew something didn't feel right. 'They were extremely heavy, heavier than you would think from ordering four empty bins,” she said. >> Read more trending news  The marijuana was in boxes inside the totes and as soon as they opened the boxes, they were hit with a strong odor. 'When the first officer got here, she was in disbelief,” the customer said. Police seized the drugs and launched an investigation. It had been shipped by Amazon’s Warehouse Deals via UPS from a facility in Massachusetts. 'We were still pretty fearful our home would be broken into, and we didn't sleep there for a few days,” the customer said. The couple said that after going back and forth with Amazon mostly by email for more than a month, they never spoke to a supervisor. They eventually received an email giving them a $150 gift card with the message, 'I am unable to do anything else at this time.' The customers said what they wanted was an apology and an explanation about how this could happen. 'There was no concern for a customer's safety. I mean, this could have turned into a worst-case scenario,' one of the customers told WFTV. Orlando police said there have been no arrests, but they are still actively investigating the case. Amazon sent a statement saying its customer service team worked directly with the customer to address concerns and will work with law enforcement officials to investigate the case.
  • Trial is set to begin this week for a Mexican man who set off a national immigration debate after he shot and killed a woman on a popular San Francisco pier.  Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, 54, acknowledges shooting Kate Steinle in the back while she was walking with her father on the downtown pier July 1, 2015.  But Zarate said the shooting was accidental. He said he was handling a handgun he found wrapped in a T-shirt under a bench on the pier when it accidentally fired. The handgun belonged to a Bureau of Land Management ranger who reported that it was stolen from his parked car in San Francisco a week before Steinle was shot.  The San Francisco district attorney’s office has charged Zarate with second-degree murder, which could result in a maximum sentence of 15 years to life in prison. Assistant District Attorney Diana Garcia declined to comment.  Zarate’s attorney Matt Gonzalez said his client didn’t realize the bundle he picked up contained a firearm, and it went off as he unwrapped the T-shirt.   “He didn’t know it was a gun when it fired,” Gonzalez said. “It all happens in a span of three seconds.” Prosecutors charge otherwise, alleging Zarate recklessly pointed the gun at people on the pier.   The suspect originally went by the name Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez when he was arrested. But his lawyer Matt Gonzalez said he now prefers to be called by his birth name of Zarate.
  • Actress Renee Zellweger will play the lead role in a movie about the final year of Judy Garland’s life that will begin production in February 2018, according to the . >> Read more trending news“Judy” will chronicle the true story of Garland as she arrives in swinging London in 1968 to perform in a series of sellout shows, according to the Hollywood Reporter. It has been nearly 30 years since Garland shot to fame as Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz,” and as she prepares to perform, she battles with management, charms musicians and reminisces with friends and fans, according to the Hollywood Reporter. Garland died on June 22, 1969, in London at the age of 47 from an overdose of barbiturates. Zellweger, who was born two months before Garland’s death, won an Academy Award in 2003 for Best Supporting Actress in the war drama film, “Cold Mountain.”
  • Nearly one-third of American adolescents and adults are affected by anxiety, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. It’s the most common mental health disorder in the country. And when it comes to teens, severe anxiety is becoming more crippling each year. In fact, over the last decade, anxiety has surpassed depression as the most common reason college students seek counseling services, the New York Times reported. The data comes from the American College Health Association’s 2016 survey of students about the previous year. Sixty-two percent of undergraduate students in the survey reported “overwhelming anxiety,” a significant increase from 50 percent in 2011. A separate survey from the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles, asks incoming college freshmen whether they “felt overwhelmed by all I had to do” during the previous year. In 1985, when the institute began surveying students on the issue, 18 percent said they felt overwhelmed. By 2010, 29 percent said they did. And in 2016, the number jumped to 41 percent. And since 2012, the Washington Post reported, the Boys Town National Hotline has seen a 12 percent spike in teens reaching out via calls, texts, chats and emails about their struggles with anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts. » RELATED: Teens and the distorted reality of social media The rate of hospital admissions for suicidal teenagers has also doubled over the past decade. Recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mirrored a national trend in suicide rates across the board. » RELATED: The suicide rate for teen girls is the highest it’s been in 40 years — Is social media to blame? But the research found suicide rates among 15- to 19-year-old girls doubled between 2007 and 2015, reaching a 40-year high. That means for every 100,000 American girls in 2015, five committed suicide. For teen boys, the rate rose by more than 30 percent. Anxiety, along with depression, cuts across all demographics, including both privileged and disadvantaged teenagers. But privileged teens are among the most emotionally distressed youth in America, Arizona State University psychology professor Suniya Luthar told the New York Times. » RELATED: How to keep your kids safe on social media  “These kids are incredibly anxious and perfectionistic,” she said, but there’s “contempt and scorn for the idea that kids who have it all might be hurting ... there’s always one more activity, one more A.P. class, one more thing to do in order to get into a top college. Kids have a sense that they’re not measuring up. The pressure is relentless and getting worse.” But helicopter parents aren’t always to blame. Many students internalize the anxiety and put the pressure on themselves, Madeline Levine, co-founder of Challenge Success, a nonprofit aimed at improving student well-being, told the Times. » RELATED: The more social media you use, the lonelier you feel, study says Another expert, psychiatrist Stephanie Eken, said despite the cultural differences, there’s a lot of overlap among teens regarding what makes them anxious. Eken mentions factors range from school, family conflicts, what food to eat, diseases, how they’re perceived by friends and notably in the last few years, Eken told the Times, to a rising fear about terrorism.  “They wonder about whether it’s safe to go to a movie theater,” she said. A lack of close, meaningful relationships is also a major factor. » RELATED: Should kids be watching new Netflix series on teen suicide?  Experts have long said hormonal, mental and physical changes associated with puberty may leave teens especially vulnerable to anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. And social media doesn’t help, Eken said, adding that teens are always comparing themselves with their peers, which leaves them miserable. When Times reporter Benoit Denizet-Lewis visited Mountain Valley, a nonprofit that offers teens need-based assistance for $910 a day, a college student at the facility said, “I don’t think we realize how much it’s affecting our moods and personalities,” he said. “Social media is a tool, but it’s become this thing that we can’t live without but that’s making us crazy.” » RELATED: This social media platform is the worst for cyberbullying  But social media can also be used to “help increase connections between people,” CDC suicide expert Thomas Simon told CNN in August. “It's an opportunity to correct myths about suicide and to allow people to access prevention resources and materials.” Still, Simon acknowledged that cyberbullying can greatly impact vulnerable youth. How parents can help According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 80 percent of kids with a diagnosable anxiety disorder are not getting treatment. And anxiety disorders are highly treatable. While anxiety can be a normal reaction to stressful environments and situations, there are specific symptoms associated with anxiety disorders. Generally, someone with anxiety disorder would have fear or anxiety that is out of proportion to the situation or inappropriate for his or her age. The anxiety would also affect normal day-to-day function. Two questions parents should ask themselves: Is my child more shy or anxious than others his or her age? Is my child more worried than other children his or her age? » RELATED: Nighttime cellphone usage linked to poor mental health among teens According to Lynn Miller, an associate professor at the University of British Columbia, those questions can help predict a child’s potential of developing an anxiety disorder. If you notice overwhelming feelings of anxiety in your child, the ADAA suggests seeking help and talking to a professional. While antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications can offer relief from symptoms, they’re not treated as cures. Instead, talk therapy is often recommended. More tips from ADAA.org. Here are some additional tips to manage anxiety and stress from the ADAA:
  • sold at Walmart, Trader Joe's and Target over concerns of Listeria monocytogenes, . The company said “a single positive” test result in random sampling by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency sparked the decision to issue the recall notice. Listeria infection can cause fever, diarrhea, flu-like symptoms and even miscarriages. 'As an owner of this company and a mom, providing safe and healthy foods to our consumers and their families is always our top priority,' Gina Nucci, director of corporate marketing, said in a release. The recall includes Brussels sprouts, broccoli and vegetable medley products distributed throughout the United States and Canada with “best if used by” dates from Oct. 11 to 20. Affected items include: Aldi supermarkets also issued recall notices for Mann products.