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    Embracing the European Union could be seen as a risky move for politicians given Britain's decision to abandon the bloc and the renewed popularity of nationalist parties. But French presidential front-runner Emmanuel Macron is doing just that. Macron, 39, an independent centrist with pro-free market views, is fiercely promoting common European ideals of peace, prosperity and freedom with a blitz of campaign events across France and Europe to explain to voters why the EU matters. While British Prime Minister Theresa May will officially trigger divorce proceedings from the bloc Wednesday, Macron's campaign team held pro-Europe events in cities around France over the weekend as the EU marked its 60th birthday. The former French economy minister described himself as an 'enthusiastic, yet lucid European' in a joint interview with French newspaper Liberation and Italian newspaper last week. He said with Britain leaving, the bloc needs to build a new leadership base anchored by France and Germany. The EU needs 'urgent' reforms because 'for the first time, many foreign leaders openly want a weakening of Europe: Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, as well as the main authoritarian leaders of the Middle East,' Macron said. One of the reforms he advocates is new cooperation on defense, a move he said would be operated by France and Germany in association with Italy, Spain and possibly the United Kingdom, even after its exit from the EU. To improve the continent's security and fight against terrorism, Macron wants the bloc to be able to deploy at least 5,000 European border guards to 'strengthen controls at the external borders' of the Schengen passport-free travel zone. He also wants the 19 nations that use the euro as their official currency to harmonize their tax policies to allow for fairer economic competition between companies that want to work in other countries. Polls suggest Macron and Marine Le Pen, the anti-immigration, anti-European Union leader of the National Front, are likely to be the two top finishers in the first round of the presidential vote on April 23. If that happens, Le Pen and Macron would go head-to-head in a May 7 runoff. Le Pen wants to pull France from the euro currency and from the European Union. On Monday, she described Macron as 'an immigrationist' because he has backed German Chancellor Angela Merkel's policies to welcome refugees from Syria. Macron met with Merkel earlier this month in Berlin, where he called for a 'new Franco-German deal' that would involve 'much more structured cooperation' on investment, on European border security, and on defense issues — in particular in the Middle East and Africa. 'You cannot be tentatively European; otherwise it's already lost,' the candidate told Liberation and La Repubblica. 'Anti-Europeans' violence is such that we need to repeat over and over what Europe has given us and can still give us, if we are involved in changing it....What Marine Le Pen wants is to recreate conflicts in Europe.' The continent's future is a strong, recurrent theme in the French presidential campaign. Politicians acknowledge a growing discontent with EU institutions, often seen by voters as distant and lacking democratic legitimacy. Conservative contender Francois Fillon advocates for a powerful Europe that would at the same time respect every nation's sovereignty. Socialist candidate Benoit Hamon wants a more democratic Europe, with representatives of national parliaments being entitled to gather and discuss the budget of the Eurozone. Far-left leader Jean-Luc Melenchon harshly criticizes free market policies and strict budget rules that he says were imposed in the EU by Germany. He has pledged to renegotiate the European treaties and says if the plan fails, he would move to take France out of the EU. The 27 nations that will make up the European Union once Britain exits the bloc renewed their vow of unity Saturday in the face of crises that are increasingly testing the bonds between members. Acknowledging that there won't be agreement on every issue, EU leaders also approved giving member nations more freedom to form partial alliances when unanimity is out of reach. 'We have united for the better. Europe is our common future,' the declaration said.
  • Browns coach Hue Jackson has little use for pro days, especially when looking at quarterbacks. Cleveland is still searching for its franchise QB after nearly two decades back in the NFL. The Browns have the top overall draft pick following a 1-15 season, and also the 12th pick. Should they opt to select a quarterback, it will be one who came to a private workout. 'It's better when you get the opportunity to take a player to dinner, get extra time with him,' Jackson said Tuesday. 'Have a private day and have him do exactly what you want to see him do as opposed to exactly how they want it. 'You could do both, but sometimes if you pick to do a pro day, some agents advise not to do a private day.' Cleveland has three quarterbacks — Cody Kessler, Kevin Hogan and Brock Osweiler — and is looking closely at top prospects Mitchell Trubisky, Deshaun Watson and DeShone Kizer in a QB-weak draft. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • U.S. researchers who monitor North Korea say satellite imagery shows possible preparations for an underground nuclear test explosion. The researchers writing on the 38 North website say the images were taken late last week at Punggye-ri (PUNG'-gare-ree) in the country's northeast, where North Korea has conducted its five previous nuclear tests. They show vehicles or equipment trailers at a tunnel entrance and possibly communications cables that could be used to initiate the test and collect data. There is no definitive evidence of a nuclear device or anything indicating the timing of a test. International concern is mounting over North Korea's nuclear and missile programs. The North conducted two nuclear test explosions last year, the latest in September. Predicting nuclear tests is notoriously difficult because the tests are conducted underground.
  • Olympic champ Michael Phelps is participating in Discovery network's Shark Week this summer, although he won't be asked to outswim one. It's not immediately clear what Phelps will be doing, although Discovery President Rich Ross said Tuesday he's intrigued about seeing the fastest human swimmer interact with nature's fastest. Perhaps Phelps can be encouraged to go underwater in a shark cage, he said. The week of shark-themed programming in mid-summer is annually Discovery's biggest event. Now that it is approaching its 29th year, programmers are on the lookout for a new wrinkle. Phelps has won 28 Olympic swimming medals, 23 of them gold.
  • The Latest on the Supreme Court arguments in a deportation case tied to bad legal advice (all times local): 11:40 a.m. The Supreme Court is trying to figure out whether immigrants should get a second chance in court when bad legal advice leads to a guilty plea and certain deportation. The justices seemed divided during an argument Tuesday about what to do in cases in which the evidence against criminal defendants is strong and the chances of acquittal by a jury are remote. The court is considering the case of Jae (JAY) Lee, a South Korean immigrant who was facing drug charges. Lee pleaded guilty after his lawyer mistakenly assured him a conviction would not lead to deportation. The Trump administration is arguing the outcome at trial would have been the same. The administration has pledged to increase deportations, with a focus on immigrants who have been convicted of crimes. __ 3:30 a.m. The Supreme Court is taking up the case of a longtime U.S. resident who is facing deportation to South Korea after pleading guilty to a drug crime based on his lawyer's bad advice. The justices are hearing argument Tuesday in an appeal by Jae (JAY) Lee, who has lived in the United States for 35 years and has never been back to South Korea since coming to the United States when he was 13. The case has taken on increased importance because President Donald Trump has promised to step up deportations, with a special focus on immigrants who have been convicted of crimes. The American Bar Association has estimated that one of every 10 criminal defendants is not an American citizen.
  • The Secret Service says they have taken a man into custody who was carrying a package near the White House after he made suspicious comments to an officer. A Secret Service official says an explosive ordinance team was on the scene on Tuesday morning to examine the package about a block from the White House. A security perimeter was established near the White House grounds, but Secret Service officials say all other West Wing activity is proceeding normally. The investigation comes after two recent fence-jumping incidents at the White House. A California man was charged with jumping the fence while carrying two cans of Mace. And a woman from Washington state got tangled up in her shoelaces trying to jump the fence last week.
  • The senior guard was the only unanimous selection to the 2016-17 AP All-America team Tuesday, receiving all first-team votes from the same 65-member national media panel that selects the weekly AP Top 25. 'I love the kid and I think he knows how I feel about him, but I've never been more proud — not that he's won a postseason award — but he's done everything that he's supposed to do,' Kansas coach Bill Self said. 'He's been a great teammate, he's been tough as nails, he's worked his butt off, he's loved by everyone in the academic departments, graduated, and to see him reap these benefits after putting in so much time is an unbelievable honor.' The rest of the All-America team includes guards Josh Hart of Villanova and Lonzo Ball of UCLA, plus forwards Caleb Swanigan of Purdue and Justin Jackson of North Carolina. Votes were based on the regular season and conference tournaments. Mason averaged 20.8 points, 4.1 rebounds and 5.1 assists while shooting 48.7 percent from 3-point range. 'My goals were always just to be successful as a team, do whatever I can do to make sure we're successful and really change it at the defensive end and get after it,' Mason said. 'Yeah, that's pretty cool to see my name alongside those great KU players, it means a lot to me, but nothing would be possible without my teammates and coaching staff.' Mason is the first All-American from Kansas since Thomas Robinson in 2012. Hart, a senior who was key to Villanova's 2016 national championship, averaged 18.9 points and 6.5 rebounds for the Wildcats. He received 62 first-team votes. 'It was definitely a goal,' Hart said of the All-America recognition. 'Now that it happened, it's humbling. A great honor. I've got to thank everyone that voted for me.' Coach Jay Wright called Hart 'the perfect combination of talent, hard work, intelligence and humility.' 'He never let any single year's accomplishment deter him from getting better,' Wright said. 'I think he's one of the most complete basketball players in the country.' The sophomore Swanigan led the nation with 26 double-doubles and was the only player in Division I to average 18 points (18.5) and 12 rebounds (12.6) while shooting 53.4 percent, 43.1 percent on 3s. 'He's a very knowledgeable guy, now he's been through it in terms of experience, understanding scouting reports and those types of things,' Purdue coach Matt Painter said. 'He really gets it. I think he really separated himself from a lot of people with the consistent play.' Ball, who has already declared for the NBA draft, took the country by storm as a freshman. He averaged 14.6 points, 6.1 rebounds and 7.9 assists while putting UCLA back on the national map in a hurry. He received 54 first-team votes. Coach Steve Alford called Ball 'very deserving of the recognition.' 'He's been special for us all year,' Alford said. 'He's been an incredible teammate, and everything that he's done has been contagious throughout our team.' The last All-American from UCLA was freshman Kevin Love in 2008. Jackson, who received 24 first-team votes, helped lead the Tar Heels to a second straight Final Four. The junior averaged 18.1 points and 4.6 rebounds this season. 'He's a better player overall,' North Carolina coach Roy Williams said. 'He's better defensively, better rebounder, he can score the basket and he's just had a year for us. 'He's been the leader of our team on the court, on the stat sheet. I couldn't be happier for him because he's really got it the old-fashioned way,' Williams said. 'He's worked, he's put in the sweat.' Nigel Williams-Goss of Gonzaga led the second team and was joined by fellow juniors Dillon Brooks of Oregon and Johnathan Motley of Baylor, sophomore Luke Kennard of Duke and freshman Malik Monk of Kentucky. The third team included freshmen Josh Jackson of Kansas, Markelle Fultz of Washington and Lauri Markkanen of Arizona, junior Bonzie Colson of Notre Dame and sophomore Ethan Happ of Wisconsin. There has been at least one unanimous All-America pick the last four seasons. ___ For more AP college basketball coverage: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • U.S. regulators have approved the first powerful, injected medicine to treat serious cases of the skin condition eczema. The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved Dupixent for moderate or severe eczema, which causes red, fiercely itchy rashes on the face, arms and legs. In three studies of the drug including a total of 2,119 participants, one-third to two-thirds achieved clear or nearly clear skin. About 4 in 10 had itching decrease sharply, bringing better sleep and reducing anxiety and depression. Dupixent will have an initial list price of $37,000 per year, according to Paris, France-based Sanofi SA and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals of Tarrytown, New York, which developed the drug. Eczema treatments have generally been limited to topical medications, steroid creams, moisturizers and ultraviolet light, plus antihistamines to relieve itching. Those work fairly well for mild eczema, but not the severe form, also called atopic dermatitis. It's also the most common form. Eczema often begins in young children, and most grow out of it, said Dr. Lisa Beck, a dermatology professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. But for other patients, the condition persists throughout adulthood, tormenting patients with relentless itching that triggers scratching, and with that, skin swelling, cracking, 'weeping' of clear fluid and, eventually, thickening of the skin, according to the FDA. 'Many of these patients gave up on health care because we offered them nothing new for years and years,' said Beck, a member of the National Eczema Association's scientific advisory board who participated in patient tests of Dupixent, also called dupilumab. The drug is an antibody that's injected just under the skin. It works by binding to a specific protein to inhibit the immune system's inflammatory response. ___ Follow Linda A. Johnson at https://twitter.com/LindaJ_onPharma
  • GRAPEVINE, Texas - GameStop, a video game and consumer electronics retailer, will close at least 150 stores after reporting another year of declined sales. >> Read more trending news The Texas-based company released its report of sales and earnings for 2017 last week, and projected a grim 2017 for some stores. In the fourth quarter of last year, total global sales decreased nearly 14 percent, and new hardware sales declined 29 percent. » STORE CLOSURES: 9 retailers closing stores nationwide this year A spokesperson told Fortune that non-productive stores would close sometime in 2017. However ,specific locations were not announced. About 2 to 3 percent of the retailer’s total amount of stores will close. USA Today reported that Game Stop plans to open 65 Technology Brands stores, which include cellphone retailers. It also plans to open 35 Collectibles stores, which sell apparel. GameStop operates 7,500 stores across 14 countries.
  • Quick Facts: The White House grounds are currently locked down The US Secret Service confirmed a suspicious package was under investigation A perimeter was established; people in the area were moved to safety  The lockdown lifted around an hour later with a suspect in custody    USSS is investigating suspicious package; security perimeter established & members of the public & media are being moved to safe a distance— U.S. Secret Service (@SecretService) March 28, 2017 Suspicious package investigation continues; suspect in custody! pic.twitter.com/O25gr5B72f— U.S. Secret Service (@SecretService) March 28, 2017 Trending Now on FOX23.com Homeowner shoots, kills 3 Wagoner Co. home invasion Animal lovers band together to give cat a full nine lives after north Tulsa fire  Man shot in head near south Tulsa skate shop Teen who threw newborn baby out window won't serve any jail time Comedian Gabriel Iglesias in life-threatening battle with his weight Trending Video VIDEO: Accused getaway driver charged with murder after home invasion
  • Still smarting from last week’s meltdown on a bill to overhaul the Obama health law, House Republicans used a closed door “family meeting” in the U.S. Capitol to both clear the air, and see if there was a way to push forward again on a plan to make major changes to Obamacare. “We had a very constructive meeting with our members,” said Speaker Paul Ryan about the focus on a GOP measure on health care reform. “I’m not going to put a timeline on it.” “I think there’s a good healthy discussion going on in there,” said Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA), one Republican who has been publicly critical of the more conservative group of lawmakers known as the Freedom Caucus. “We need to not quit until the moment that we find the right solutions,” said Rep. Brian Mast (R-FL). Various GOP lawmakers described the meeting as a “soul searching” moment; one said it was a “family feud of sorts.” “It was really about trying the best we can to come together,” said Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY), a prime ally of President Donald Trump in the House. While Collins said the GOP should avoid recriminations, he still managed to throw some verbal elbows at the Freedom Caucus, at one point labeling them as a group of “perfectionists on our far right.” As for the Freedom Caucus, the leader of that group again said they are willing to reach a deal on health care, as Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) urged lawmakers to postpone a scheduled Easter break if needed to forge a deal. Freedom Caucus Chair Meadows say he doesn't think members should go home for recess until they pass healthcare bill, wants to get to 'yes' — Deirdre Walsh (@deirdrewalshcnn) March 28, 2017 Others in the Freedom Caucus though were ready to support only one thing first, and that is repeal of the Obama health law – and then move on to figure out what’s next. “We will find out who is truly for repealing Obamacare, and who is not,” said Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), who says he will use a process known as a “discharge petition” to try to force action on his bill to just repeal the Obama health law. In the end, while there was a lot of positive talk about moving forward, there was no concrete sign that somehow differences had been bridged among more moderate and conservative lawmakers in the GOP on health care. GOP SUMMARY: Republicans cannot agree on whether to agree to disagree. — Lisa Desjardins (@LisaDNews) March 28, 2017 After the meeting, Speaker Paul Ryan echoed the assessments of his rank and file. “This discussion was an honest and very constructive step forward,” he told reporters. But there was no immediate breakthrough on an overhaul of the Obama health law.
  • What would you do if you found yourself with your father’s life in your hands? That was the situation 14-year-old Tex “T” Mitchell IV faced one afternoon while sailing on Lake Belton, west of Temple, Texas, with three of his friends under the guidance of his dad. >> Read more trending news “My dad started laying down and said he couldn’t really breathe,” T said. “We didn’t know what was going on.” His dad, Tex Mitchell, leader of Boy Scout Troop 410, had invited some boys in the troop, most of whom had little prior sailing experience, out on the lake that day last summer. “I had forgotten my hat and I didn’t think it affected me that much, but I didn’t know what else to blame it on,” said Mitchell, who initially thought he was experiencing an asthma attack or heat exhaustion. In reality, he was having a heart attack. “As I became more and more incapacitated,” he said, “the boys really had to take command of the vessel and get us back.” Time was ticking, and every second counted. What should they do? T, who had started taking sailing classes with his dad two years before, was the only one with enough experience to take the boat back to the marina. But he had never done it on his own before. While he navigated the boat, friends Jake Yepez and Aaron Walls performed first aid on Mitchell, using ice and water bottles from the cooler in hopes of lowering his temperature. They also asked him questions to keep him engaged. “For the questions, it was mostly where were you born, what’s the funniest thing that ever happened to you as a child. … I was trying to make sure that he didn’t go unconscious,” Yepez said. “When we were about to get into the marina he seemed to be talking much less.” T got the boat into the marina at the Lake Belton Yacht Club on his first try and called 911. Yepez and Walls continued first aid, while friend Alex Graves ran inside to tell the employees what was happening. Within minutes, the whole group was in the back of an ambulance on the way to the hospital. Mitchell ended up having two stents implanted in his cardiac arteries. “I am super proud of them and super thankful, too,” Mitchell said. “They did a fantastic job. The doctors were very clear that the speed with which I arrived at the hospital was critical to my really fantastical, remarkable recovery.” He also believes Scouting played a large role in the boys’ ability to react quickly in a stressful situation. “I credit the scouting program for really teaching them the leadership qualities and bravery to step up when a situation arises that requires them to act with authority,” he said. “I really credit the Scouting program for myself being alive today.” But even though in recent months the boys have received statewide attention and multiple honors for their heroism, they remain modest. “I don’t feel like a hero,” Graves said. “I just am fortunate to be able to have the opportunity to go sailing. I just felt really good about him getting a full recovery, because I know how much it would have hurt T if he hadn’t had a full recovery, that being his dad.” T, who described the experience of saving his dad’s life as “pretty scary,” said he’s glad that he and his dad learned to sail together — and will continue to sail together. “You have really good opportunities if you know how to sail,” T said. “If your friend ever takes you sailing and something bad happens, you know how to take control.” Now that he’s had some time to reflect on all that’s happened, his dad, too, is grateful for his son’s ability to take control. “I always knew my son was a hero,” Mitchell said. “I just didn’t know he was going to be my hero.”
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden said he regrets not running for president in 2016 and he thinks he could have won the election if he had followed through with his plan to run. >> Read more trending news “I had planned on running for president, and although it would have been a very difficult primary, I think I could have won,” Biden said during a speech Friday at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York. “I don’t know, maybe not. But I thought I could have won. […] I had a lot of data, and I was fairly confident that if I were the Democratic Party’s nominee, I had a better than even chance of being president ... Do I regret not being president? Yes.” Biden, 73, said he believes he was “the best qualified” for the position. But Biden said he doesn’t regret the time that he spent with his son, Beau Biden, who died of brain cancer in 2015. Being on the campaign trail would have taken away from that. In September 2016, Biden revealed that he had planned on running for president, but after his son was diagnosed with cancer in 2014, part of his “soul was gone.” “No man or woman should run unless they are capable of giving every ounce,” Biden said. “I wasn’t healthy enough to pour my whole heart and soul into the effort.”
  • A pair of escalator mechanics have been arrested after police say they tampered with an escalator in the Langham Place mall in the Mong Kok area of Hong Kong, causing a dangerous situation. They were questioned after an incident in which the escalator abruptly changed directions, sending passengers plummeting to the ground floor of the mall. Eighteen were injured; one man was hospitalized in serious condition for a head wound. >> Read more trending news In a statement obtained by CNN, Otis Elevator Co. spokesperson Ian Fok called the arrest of its employees “a surprise.” He added, “Our legal team is working with law enforcement to clarify the situation and intends to defend our mechanics.” Video obtained by the South China Morning Post shows the moment the escalator changed directions, eliciting screams from dozens of people riding at the time.
  • A Canadian man will have to come up with a new vanity license plate, or decide to go with the standard tag, after he was told his plate could be misinterpreted. >> Read more trending news  Lorne Grabher has had his last name on his license plate for decades, but a few months ago received a letter from the Nova Scotia Registry of Motor Vehicles has canceled the plate after 25 years, CBC reported. That’s because others “can misinterpret it as a socially unacceptable slogan.” Grabher is now calling out Nova Scotia officials for discrimination. The Department of Transportation told the CBC via email that they received a complaint over the plate “as misogynistic and promoting violence against woman” and that they cannot mark that it is a name vs. an action. Nova Scotia has made about 3,100 words not acceptable for license plates including HESHE and GOD4U2.