ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
48°
Cloudy
H 57° L 45°
  • cloudy-day
    48°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 57° L 45°
  • cloudy-day
    56°
    Afternoon
    Cloudy. H 57° L 45°
  • cloudy-day
    55°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 60° L 51°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
That morning cup of coffee: Slurping your way to good health?
Close

That morning cup of coffee: Slurping your way to good health?

That morning cup of coffee: Slurping your way to good health?

That morning cup of coffee: Slurping your way to good health?

Caffeine is the prime suspect in the ocular keratitis, dryness of the eyes, that sidelined big-league slugger Josh Hamilton recently.

Hamilton had described the lack of focus he was experiencing as being on 'an extreme sugar high.' The problem was instead ultimately traced to his caffeine consumption.

"Drinking caffeine -- coffee in the morning, coffee midday, energy drink before the game, chocolate after the game -- all these things were compounding and making it worse and worse," said Hamilton.

But some results show caffeine can help people avoid everything from heart disease to Parkinson's disease.

The blog Mother Nature Network details several studies:

  •  Scientists at Harvard University examined data from 67,470 middle-aged women who were followed for about 26 years. When compared to women who drank little or no coffee, the ones who drank four or more cups per day had a 25 percent lower risk of developing endometrial cancer. Those who drank two or three cups per day had a 7 percent lower risk.

  • According to a 2009 meta-analysis, at least fourteen out of eighteen cohort studies revealed a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus with frequent coffee intake, and that the risk of type 2 diabetes goes down with each cup of coffee consumed daily.

  • Studies have demonstrated that those who use caffeine are less likely to develop Parkinson's disease. The latest study examining the connection found that caffeine can also help with movement symptoms for people who already have the disease.

  • The New England Journal of Medicine published a study that found that increased coffee consumption is linked to longer a longer life. Coffee drinkers didn't die as early from heart or respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, injuries, accidents or infections, and in fact, they decreased their risk of death from these factors by 10 to 16 percent.

So is that morning cup of coffee, that so many of us are addicted to, good or bad?

"There's not a lot of good research on it just yet," said St. John Medical Center Dr. Theron Bliss.

He said there's not much financial incentive for drug companies to study something that is so readily available to the public in hundreds of forms.

The only good consensus he says is that caffeine can boost athletic performance, which is why he says it's monitored in Olympic and college athletes.

The downside he says is that it elevates blood pressure.

Other than those two things, he says all the claims, both good and bad, are largely unclear and unproven.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Prosecutors say a 10-year-old was killed by his friend with a crossbow last fall in Lincoln County. On Friday, KRMG learned that the 13-year-old teen has been charged with first-degree murder. Investigators say 10-year-old Austin Almanza was fatally struck by an arrow, which traveled through his body and then pierced his 8-year-old brother in the arm. Prosecutors charged the 13-year-old boy as an adult, making him one of the youngest ever in the state to be charged as an adult with first-degree murder. At a hearing Thursday, a judge ordered a psychological evaluation of the boy to determine how his case should be handled in the future.
  • Reinforcing its strong connection with social conservatives, the Trump administration announced Thursday a new federal office to protect medical providers refusing to participate in abortion, assisted suicide or other procedures on moral or religious grounds. Leading Democrats and LGBT groups immediately denounced the move, saying “conscience protections” could become a license to discriminate, particularly against gay and transgender people. The announcement by the Department of Health and Human Services came a day ahead of the annual march on Washington by abortion opponents, who will be addressed via video link by President Donald Trump. HHS put on a formal event in the department’s Great Hall, with Republican lawmakers and activists for conscience protections as invited speakers. The religious and conscience division will be part of the HHS Office for Civil Rights, which enforces federal anti-discrimination and privacy laws. Officials said it will focus on upholding protections already part of federal law. Violations can result in a service provider losing government funding. No new efforts to expand such protections were announced, but activists on both sides expect the administration will try to broaden them in the future.
  • A fisherman who had to jump into the Columbia River to avoid being crushed in a boating crash has filed a lawsuit against the person who was captaining the other vessel. Clatsop County Sheriff’s Department said that the motor boat driver, Marlin Lee Larsen, 75, was sitting down while driving his boat and that he couldn’t see over the dash when he crashed into the fishing boat that Bryan Maess, 47, and two other friends were on, Oregon Live reported. >> Read more trending news  A GoPro camera captured the crash that happened in August. Christopher McMahon, one of Maess’ friends, waved his arms and yelled, trying to get Larsen’s attention. When that didn’t work, and it was apparent that the larger boat was going to crash into theirs, Maess, McMahon and Roni Durham jumped into the water. Investigators found that if they had not abandoned ship, the friends would have been injured or even killed. Maess, however, was injured by jumping into the water and being hit by debris, including injuries to his ankle, leg and arm, vision problems and headaches. He still wears a knee brace, according to the lawsuit, in which he is suing Larsen for $372,500, Oregon Live reported. McMahon and Durham have not filed suit yet, but have started the process. Both are said to have suffered hypothermia and cuts. Durham claims she has suffered psychological trauma and hasn’t been on a boat since the accident. Larsen’s son-in-law was on the boat driven by Larsen at the time of the crash. He told police that he warned Larsen to pay attention and that he had seen his father-in-law on his cellphone in the past, including the day of, but not at the time of, the accident. Larsen told Oregon Live that he wasn’t using the device while he was driving the boat and that the allegations were “fake news.” He also said that the lawsuit, in his opinion, was not necessary since the other people were not hurt badly. Larsen also has a criminal case filed against him, in which he has pleaded not guilty to reckless operation of a boat, fourth-degree assault and recklessly endangering the lives of others, Oregon Live reported.
  • A Michigan tow truck driver working to load a crashed vehicle by another car that lost control in slick conditions. >> Read more trending news On Wednesday morning at 10:30, the tow truck driver was working to load a vehicle that had been involved in a crash onto a truck.  A Michigan State Police officer was behind the tow truck, and on cruiser cam, the officer can be heard asking for another cruiser to block the I-96 on-ramp. A moment later, the cruiser cam captures footage of a car losing control on the ramp, crashing into the tow truck. The tow truck driver was able to run onto the freeway at the last moment, avoiding being crushed by the car. “A trooper was writing a crash that occurred on I-96 in the express lane and this individual came down the ramp from southbound Southfield too fast, lost control of the vehicle and hit the tow truck,’’ Lt. Mike Shaw told The Detroit Free Press. The car that lost control ended up on top of the car that was being loaded. The at-fault driver was cited “for violation of basic speed law, driving too fast for road conditions and violation of Michigan’s emergency vehicle move-over law,’’ Shaw said. Nobody was injured, the Free Press reported.
  • The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday announced that it would hear argument on the third version of President Donald Trump’s travel and refugee plan, which would limit visits to the United States by people from certain Muslim-majority nations, and slow down the number of refugees accepted into the country. Arguments will take place in April, with a ruling expected by the end of June, instantly making this into one of the more important cases of the High Court’s term. “We look forward to the Court’s review of this important case,” said lawyer Neal Katyal, who has represented the state of Hawaii in its efforts to block the travel order. Supreme Court adds travel ban case to its busy agenda. Argument in April to include statutory, constitutional questions. #SCOTUS — Mark Sherman (@shermancourt) January 19, 2018 Like earlier versions of the travel order, this one has become hung up in legal fights in the courts, though the Supreme Court ruled in December that the Trump Administration could enforce the ban while appeals are underway. A federal appeals court in San Francisco – the Ninth Circuit – struck down the travel ban last month. There is also a separate challenge against the President’s travel order going before the Fourth Circuit. The Supreme Court has just agreed to hear #HawaiivsTrump, our challenge to Trump's travel ban. We look forward to the Court's review of this important case. @realdonaldtrump, see you in Court. — Neal Katyal (@neal_katyal) January 19, 2018 The plan limits travel from Yemen, Syria, Chad, Libya, Iran, and Somalia. In addition to the QPs in the govt's petition (below), #SCOTUS has added the following: Does the travel ban violate the Establishment Clause? pic.twitter.com/PjwjLEPioL — Kimberly Robinson (@KimberlyRobinsn) January 19, 2018