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Survey says women are 'grumpier' than men in the morning
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Survey says women are 'grumpier' than men in the morning

Survey says women are 'grumpier' than men in the morning

Survey says women are 'grumpier' than men in the morning

There's nothing quite like a gender-battle to get people riled up, ESPECIALLY one that says women are grumpier than men when they wake up in the mornings.

But surprisingly perhaps, we found the men and women around the hallways at KRMG were pretty much in agreement with the survey that showed up in the British newspaper Daily Express.

"I don't find that hard to believe," said one woman.  "I'm a lot grumpier in the morning than my husband is."

Hear KRMG's Steve Berg report on grumpy women survey

One man says it's all relative, depending on the day the survey was done.

"I bet they're grumpier on Monday mornings than they are on other days of the week," he said.

And he says it could depend on, ahem... "circumstances".

"I think it depends on who you're married to," he laughed.

Men and women may NOT agree however on the REASON for the grumpiness.

Women say it's becaue they take on more of the childcare duties.

"Y'know I care that she's on the bus and dressed appropriately, and my husband just, y'know, that's something MOM does," one woman told us.

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