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Study: Coffee good for your eyes
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Study: Coffee good for your eyes

Study: Coffee good for your eyes

Study: Coffee good for your eyes

This time, the coffee study says regularly drinking a cup of Joe may actually help keep your eyes healthy.

Taking a closer look, the antioxidant found in coffee called chlorogenic acid helps prevent retinal degeneration. But hold on, this is a study after all, so this has only been shown in mice.

Mice that were treated with CLA had no retinal damage at all even after they were intentionally exposed to nitric oxide. They did that to try to speed up the degenerative process.

Now they’re looking into whether or not coffee delivers CLA right to the retina. If it does, scientists could possibly make a specific brew of coffee to help your eyes.

More here

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  • Years of testing remain, but UT Health San Antonio researchers say they’ve cured Type 1 diabetes in mice. In peer-reviewed paper, they say a “gene transfer” can “wake up” cells in the pancreas to produce insulin. >> Read more trending news  Health researchers at the University of Texas think they have found a way to trick the body into curing Type 1 diabetes. The immune system of a person with diabetes kills off useful “beta” cells, but the UT researchers say they have found a way to make other cells in the pancreas perform the necessary work. Their approach, announced earlier this month in the academic journal Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, not only would have implications for Type 1, formerly called juvenile diabetes, but also could help treat the far more common Type 2 variety, also known as adult-onset diabetes. The researchers have cured mice, which are genetically similar to people but different enough that new rounds of animal testing — and millions of dollars more — are needed before human trials can begin. The researchers’ approach is sure to garner skeptics, at least in part because it is a significant departure from the many other attempts at curing diabetes, which typically involve transplanting new cells and/or suppressing the immune system’s attempts to kill off useful ones. By contrast, “we’re taking a cell that is already present in the body — it’s there, and it’s happy — and programming it to secrete insulin, without changing it otherwise,” said Ralph DeFronzo, chief of the diabetes research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. Diabetes is a disease characterized by a person’s inability to process carbohydrates, a condition that if untreated can lead to often-catastrophic health consequences: lethargy, diminished eyesight, heart attacks, strokes, blindness and a loss of circulation in the feet that could lead to amputation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that in 2014, about 29 million Americans – almost 1 in 10 – had diabetes. The core problem is insulin. Most people naturally secrete that substance when they eat something with carbohydrates, such as bread, potatoes and candy bars. Insulin acts like a concierge that escorts the sugar from the bloodstream into the cells, providing the cells with the energy to function. In most people, the body is continually monitoring blood sugar and producing insulin as needed. In Type 2 diabetes — which makes up 9 out of 10 diabetes cases and is generally associated with older people and weight gain — the cells reject the insulin, causing sugar to build up in the bloodstream even as cells are starved for energy. Type 2 is often treated with pills that tell the cells to let in the insulin. But in Type 2 diabetes, the body also often gradually loses the ability to produce insulin, requiring insulin injections. In Type 1 — the type the researchers studied — the body has simply stopped producing insulin. This type often manifests in children, though it can sometimes develop in adults as well. The reason the body stops producing insulin is that it kills off the pancreas’ beta cells, which produce insulin. People with Type 1 diabetes must get their insulin from injections or ingestion, a cumbersome and often imprecise task. Too little insulin and blood sugar levels stay high for extended periods, potentially damaging the body; too much and blood sugar levels crash, possibly causing a person with diabetes to faint or experience an even worse problems, such as a stroke. DeFronzo’s partner, Bruno Doiron, decided to see whether the body could reliably produce insulin without transplanting new cells. He used a “gene transfer” technique on mice, delivered via a virus, that activated insulin production in cells already in the pancreas — for instance, those that produced certain enzymes. “We’re not fundamentally changing the cell,” DeFronzo said. “We’re just giving it one additional task.” The mice immune systems did not attack the new insulin-producing cells. Most important, according to the findings: The cells produced the right amount of insulin: not so much that they sent a mouse into a blood sugar free fall, not so little that blood sugar levels stayed high. The mice have shown no sign of diabetes for more than a year, according to the findings. Quite a bit of work remains before testing will start on people. If they can raise enough money — they estimate $5 million to $10 million — they can proceed to testing on larger animals, such as pigs, dogs or primates, a next step that would be planned in conjunction with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. They hope to start human trials in three years. DeFronzo and Doiron said they expect skepticism but said much of it will be driven by how unconventional their work is. Doiron added that, although the technique is unconventional in the context of diabetes, using a virus to deliver a gene transfer is an established technique, having been approved dozens of times by the FDA to treat diseases. “We can use the cells the body has naturally,” Doiron said. “This will simply wake up the cells to produce insulin.” Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes The work of Bruno Doiron and Ralph DeFronzo focuses on Type 1 diabetes, not Type 2. Both diseases involve a problem with insulin, the substance that healthy bodies produce to take sugar from the bloodstream into the cells and power the body. Type 2 is far more common. The main issue is that the cells reject insulin, causing sugar to build up in the bloodstream. The common treatment is a pill that makes the cells accept the insulin (and sugar it carries into the cell). But over time, people with Type 2 diabetes often lose the ability to produce insulin. With Type 1 diabetes, people simply stop producing insulin. Their bodies kill off the cells in the pancreas that produce it. Those with Type 1 diabetes must inject or ingest insulin. People with Type 2 often grow increasingly dependent on insulin injections, though Type 2 can sometimes be cured or controlled through diet and exercise.
  • Going into this week's federal budget battle, the White House toyed with a hardball tactic to force congressional Democrats to negotiate on President Donald Trump's priorities. They just might eliminate billions of dollars in disputed 'Obamacare' subsidies. But a study out Tuesday from a nonpartisan group suggests that could backfire. Stopping the Affordable Care Act payments at issue may actually wind up costing the federal government billions more than it would save. The Kaiser Family Foundation found that taxpayers would end up paying 23 percent more than the potential savings from eliminating the health law's 'cost-sharing' subsidies, which help low-income people with insurance deductibles and co-payments. It adds up to an estimated $2.3 billion more in 2018, or an additional $31 billion over 10 years. How's that possible? The short answer is that insurers would still be free to raise premiums, driving federal spending even higher on a separate subsidy provided under the program. 'You end up with a counter-intuitive result,' said Larry Levitt, one of the study's authors. Former Congressional Budget Office director Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a Republican economist, reviewed the Kaiser study for The Associated Press and concurred. 'I think this may even be a conservative estimate,' he said. 'It says what's at stake: double-digit premium increases and more money out of the Treasury, not less.
  • Dale Earnhardt Jr., NASCAR’s most popular driver, will retire at the end of the season, his team, Hendrick Motorsports announced. Earnhardt, known as just “Junior,” is the son of the NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Sr., who was killed in the Daytona 500 in 2001. His grandfather Ralph Earnhardt also raced stock cars. Earnhardt Jr. has won the most popular driver award 14 straight times. In 18 full seasons in NASCAR’s top Cup series, Earnhardt won 26 times, twice in the Daytona 500, in 2004 and 2014. But he never won the series title. His best finish this year is fifth; he is currently 24th in the standings. Earnhardt is 42 years old; his father was killed at 49. Earnhardt was married on New Year’s Eve to Amy Reimann, and he is also returning from a serious concussion that sidelined him last July. It was his second concussion in four years, and it caused him to miss 18 races. “When I got my first concussion, in 1998, it was like, ‘Wow. I feel dizzy, ha ha,'” he said in January. “It’s scary now, knowing everything we know. There’s still a ton to learn. We’re going through such a transition how we talk about concussions, how we treat concussions. It’s very interesting to me. Very educational.” “I do feel like this is a new chapter, for whatever reason,” Earnhardt said before the new season started this year. “I don’t have a vision for what’s going to happen. I don’t know how to explain it, but it feels like a new me.”
  • Panera Bread Co. will hire 10,000 new employees by the end of 2017 as it expands its delivery service, the company said in a statement Monday. According to Panera, the company is planning to expand delivery options to 35 to 40 percent of its locations. It now delivers at 15 percent of its locations. Panera president Blaine Hurst says each café will hire between seven and 12 staff members and drivers. The drivers will use their own vehicles which will be subject to inspection on a regular basis, Hurst said. The delivery service will be digital and mobile ordering-based. The radius will be within an 8-minute drive of the restaurant and will be available between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m., seven days a week. The order must be a minimum of $5, and the delivery charge will be $3 in most areas, according to the statement. The expanded delivery service is expected to add $250,000 per year to each store’s annual average revenue of $2.6 million. There are around 2,000 stores in 46 states and Ontario, Canada. Panera is in the process of being acquired by JAB Holding. The deal is reported to be valued at about $7.5 billion.  To find out if Panera delivers in your area, click here.  
  • A Facebook scam is making its rounds on the internet targeting Lowe’s Home Improvements. The Facebook post claims that Lowe’s is offering $50-off coupons for Mother’s Day. When clicking on the Facebook post, a user-friendly survey will appear on a website that resembles Lowe’s website. However, this fraudulent page is a scam and looking to steal your information. Those who participate have no chance of getting a gift card. There is a survey linked to the scam that reads: Congratulations! You have been selected to take part in our short survey to have a chance to get $50 Coupon!We only have 332 coupons remaining so hurry up! 1/3: Have you ever been at Lowe’s? Yes No Don’t remember Customers are also looking to Lowe’s and asking whether the coupon is valid. Lowe’s said the offer is a phishing scam to gather personal information and they aren’t affiliated with the fraudsters in any way. Please be careful when responding to any pop-up ad either online or via social media; as, more often than not, the offer of gift cards or other prizes to customer’s in the guise of a specific company are set up to get your personal information for nefarious purposes. The scam also requires victims to pass it to their friends, officials say. Here are some tips to help you avoid online coupon scams, according to the Better Business Bureau: Check out who is offering the coupon. Verify whether the coupon is legit by visiting the company’s website. Be cautious of pop-up offers. Read the fine print. Watch out for a reward that’s too good to be true. Pay attention to having to enter personal information to win a gift card. Check to see if the coupon is honored by the store. Be wary of required phone calls. Don’t fall for phony coupons via e-mail.