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Local
Some see pattern in series of north Tulsa arsons
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Some see pattern in series of north Tulsa arsons

Some see pattern in series of north Tulsa arsons
Photo Credit: Russell Mills

Some see pattern in series of north Tulsa arsons

A vacant home burned down Tuesday morning in north Tulsa, and if the story sounds familiar, that's because it happens often.

A string of fires, many deliberately set, have destroyed homes in that area of the city in recent years, and investigators have made few arrests.

Some think many of those fires show a pattern, including a woman who spoke with KRMG at the scene of Tuesday's blaze in the 1200 block of N. Boston Ave.

Sondra Holt owns three homes in the area.

She tells KRMG she sees a pattern in many of those arson cases.

"All of these houses, the ones that have burned down, have either been put up for sale or they've been abandoned for less than a year, then they're on fire."

She said she saw a similar problem when she lived in Atlanta, Georgia.

"I've seen this happen in downtown Atlanta. Everybody...was paid to move further out, then houses were burned down or vandalized."

She added that she thinks it happens deliberately.

"When you allow...people that are on different drugs to be in abandoned houses over and over again, and then you see houses that have been abandoned in partiulcar areas being burned, and then you see areas such as Brady District, the houses being rebuilt... and because of the area that we're in, closest to Guthrie Green, closest to the arts district -- hmm. Yeah."

She sees it as a form of gentrification, and says it began years ago.

"When I was a little girl, there used to be houses all along Cincinnati," now Martin Luther King Blvd. "Now they're gone."

The Fire Department admits some frustration in trying to solve all the arson cases.

They have not yet determined if someone set Tuesday morning's fire deliberately.

Anyone with information about a suspicious fire is urged to call the Arson Hotline at 918-596-ARSN (2776).

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