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'Smart meter' installers accused of jumping, breaking locked gates
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'Smart meter' installers accused of jumping, breaking locked gates

'Smart meter' installers accused of jumping, breaking locked gates
Photo Credit: Staff
PSO installs smart meters in Owasso

'Smart meter' installers accused of jumping, breaking locked gates

With concerns about the potential health and safety risks of so-called "smart meters" mounting, even the installation process has riled some people up in the Tulsa area.

John Filbeck, who works for KRMG and FOX23 as a traffic reporter and storm chaser, says the internal lock on his gate was broken and his dogs set free by installers who went to his home to put a PSO AMI meter in place.

"I wasn't there when they came to the house, but I have my gates locked from the inside," he told our reporter. "They pulled on the gate, and popped the lock on the inside, then went inside and installed the digital meter, and then just left the gate open and my dogs got out."

He found the dogs several blocks away, but isn't happy about the damage and the hassle.

"The reason why I knew somebody was in there was when I got home, the gate was wide open," he said.

He knows it was PSO because not only was there a new meter on his home, "they had also left a note on the door basically saying 'we were here, and we installed a smart meter."

PSO spokesman Stan Whiteford tells KRMG that it's not their policy to trespass or damage property.

"We want to be as respectful of people's property as we always are," he told KRMG, adding that he would look into the situation.

Luci Morgan, who lives near 111th and Memorial, said she had a similar experience.

While she managed to prevent installation on her own home, she says installers jumped over her locked gate to install a meter on her neighbor's home.

Whiteford said he would also look into that incident.

He added that installers will open any unlocked gate and enter private property to install the meters.

Customers can opt out if they don't already have the meters installed, but can expect to pay a one-time fee and higher utility rates.

Call PSO at 1-888-216-3523 for more information.

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