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President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their entourage – including first daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner – met Pope Francis at the Vatican during the president’s trip to Italy.
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  • She didn’t live in Sand Springs, and it’s unclear why she ended up in a bathroom at the Walmart there. Katherine Caraway, 29, died in that bathroom. While police say there are no signs of foul play, they still need to unravel the mystery of why she was there. KRMG has learned Caraway had been living in Muskogee, but was originally from Texas. A mother of a young son, she apparently entered the store Friday, and the boy wasn’t with her. Her body was discovered in a family bathroom at the back of the store Monday. Employees apparently thought the bathroom door was locked because it was out of order, and had hung a sign to that effect on the door. But Monday, they unlocked the door and made the sad discovery. Police say her death appears to have been from natural causes, but the medical examiner has not completed its report so the cause of death is pending.
  • A judge sentenced a Morganton, North Carolina, man to life in prison Tuesday morning at the federal courthouse in Asheville. >> Watch the news report here Justin Sullivan, who was 19 years old when he was first arrested in 2015, pleaded guilty last November to one count of attempting to commit an act of terrorism transcending national boundaries. >> READ: Department of Justice on Justin Sullivan sentencing He told the FBI he was a converted Muslim and wanted to kill 1,000 people by using cyanide-laced bullets and vehicles filled with bombs. Sullivan wanted to get an AR-15 from a gun show in Hickory to kill a large number of U.S. citizens, according to court documents.But what he didn't know was that he was corresponding with an undercover FBI agent.  >> On WSOCTV.com: Morganton teen accused of planning attacks to support ISIS, DOJ says During the sentencing, Sullivan told the court that he was not a bad person and that a life sentence was not justified. Prosecutors said in September of 2014, Sullivan converted to Islam, became a violent Islamic extremist and watched ISIS videos, wanting to create his own Islamic state in the United States. 'He planned to attack a concert or a club, places that we would call soft targets, places where people would be about enjoying their lives and not expecting acts of violence,” said U.S. Attorney Jill Westmoreland Rose.The judge said that it was an act of terrorism and that Sullivan was cold, calculated and cowardly.Sullivan stood up and told the judge it was a lie to describe him as a cold-blooded murderer. The 21-year-old is also accused of murdering his neighbor, 74-year-old John Clark, who was found in a shallow grave next to his home after being shot three times in the head in December 2014. >> On WSOCTV.com: Teen accused of supporting ISIS, killing neighbor faces death penalty The FBI found the rifle used in that shooting while investigating the terrorism case. The district attorney plans to seek the death penalty in that case.  After his sentencing, Sullivan's father spoke to WSOC-TV. 'As parents, we're not happy, but as Americans, I accept it,” Rich Sullivan said. “Of course, he is still my son and I still love him.' Sullivan’s parents also alerted authorities prior to his arrest after a silencer arrived at the family's home. The FBI acted after learning Sullivan was plotting to murder them because they were interfering with his plot to kill others. >> Read more trending news WSOC reporter Dave Faherty asked Rich Sullivan if he forgives his son. “No, I can't,” Rich Sullivan said. The focus now turns to Sullivan’s capital murder trial in Burke County for the shooting death of John Clark. FBI agents said they found the murder weapon at Sullivan's home and matched it through ballistics. 'From what we have learned about Justin Sullivan is that from a very early age, and I'm talking eight or nine years old, he has suffered from real depression and suicidal ideation,' said defense attorney Vicki Jayne. >> Watch the news conference here
  • A terrified family watched from inside their home as bees swarmed their 45-pound dog.   Debbie Leonard tells WPTV that her teenage children let the family's dog Delilah out into their backyard last Wednesday. When the bees swarmed Delilah, Leonard says her children were afraid to open the door because of the number of bees outside.   Daughter Rebecca Leonard said through tears that Delilah was 'jumping up at the door handle and chewing on it, trying to get us to open the door.'   The Leonards say hundreds of bees swarmed the dog.   They took her to a veterinarian, where they found she'd been stung over 100 times. Delilah died in Rebecca Leonard's arms.   Debbie Leonard says a beekeeper found a feral beehive in a tree.
  • Tulsa bus riders will have service on Sunday starting July Second. Tulsa Transit will use the same routes as the Monday through Saturday service. The only difference will be that smaller buses will be used. Vision Tulsa sales tax money will be used to pay for the extra day of bus service.
  • In a surprise to many in his own party, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday postponed plans for a vote this week on a GOP health care bill, as internal divisions among Republicans burst into the open on the best way to overhaul the Obama health law, delaying any vote until next month at the earlies. Here is what’s next on the health care front: 1. No vote until after the July Fourth break. The plan from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was to have a final vote on a GOP health bill by this Friday at the latest. Instead, the new plan is to come up with some deals and secure the 50 votes needed for passage in July. “I think this is a good decision,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), who expressed optimism that a vote could take place the week of July 10. “We’re so close,” Perdue added. But one thing I’ve learned over the years is Congress only feels the pressure to act right before a vacation break – and that happens July 28. 2. Some not so subtle GOP messages. One thing that was striking were the statements issued by several GOP Senators – after the vote had been delayed – as several Republicans waited to publicly pronounce their opposition and concerns. For Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), it was the level of Medicaid spending. Maybe the biggest surprise was a tweet from Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS) – who wasn’t on anyone’s radar – that he was opposed to the bill as it currently stands. To me, that’s a canary in the coal mine for broader GOP concerns about their health care bill. The Senate healthcare bill missed the mark for Kansans and therefore did not have my support. — Jerry Moran (@JerryMoran) June 27, 2017 3. Some Republicans sounding some odd notes. Along with the statement from Sen. Moran, another post-delay item deserves a note, from Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT). “The first draft of the bill included hundreds of billions of dollars in tax cuts for the affluent,” Lee said in a statement, which sounded more like something that a Democratic Senator might say, rather than a very conservative Republican. health111 4. Who can McConnell peel off on health care? While various GOP Senators said they opposed the Republican health plan, they also included the caveat that they don’t like the way it is right now. Things could change in coming days and weeks in order to get someone to vote “Yes.” But for Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV), his message in a telephone town hall to voters back in the Silver State on Tuesday night was that he doesn’t expect major changes in how the GOP bill would deal with the Medicaid program. “I do not believe that Ronald Reagan would have supported this health care bill,” Heller said. I’ll put him down as a “No” for right now. 'This just shows you they don't have the votes right now…and they can't count on mine going forward.' — Heller on GOP postponing vote — Jon Ralston (@RalstonReports) June 28, 2017 5. But don’t declare the bill dead just yet. Remember, the House came back from several near-death experiences on health care in March and April, and still managed to get something approved in May. So, just because the Senate has thrown a tire does not mean that the entire bill is going into the Legislative Ditch. Speaker Paul Ryan said a few hours before the Senate got the chain wrapped around the axle that he wouldn’t bet against his Senate counterpart. The Majority Leader will be tested now, and we’ll see how Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) performs in the spotlight. Ryan: 'I would not bet against Mitch McConnell…I have every expectation the Senate will move this bill.' — Phil Mattingly (@Phil_Mattingly) June 27, 2017 Stay tuned.