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Protest planned at scheduled execution
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Protest planned at scheduled execution

Protest planned at scheduled execution
Photo Credit: Rennett Stowe

Protest planned at scheduled execution

A group seeking to abolish the death penalty in Oklahoma plans a demonstration outside the governor's mansion to protest the scheduled execution of a 48-year-old man.

The Oklahoma Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and other opponents of capital punishment will meet Tuesday afternoon for a demonstration followed by a silent vigil at 6 p.m., when the execution is set to begin.

Johnny Dale Black is scheduled to die for the 1998 stabbing death of Bill Pogue, a prominent southern Oklahoma horse trainer. Pogue suffered 11 stab wounds, broken ribs and two punctured lungs following a roadside attack.

Black apologized to the victim's family during a clemency hearing last month, saying the attack was a case of mistaken identity. The board voted to deny a clemency recommendation.

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