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Pregnant coach, bus driver killed in team bus crash

The bus was carrying the Seton Hill woman’s team to a game when it careened off the Pennsylvania Turnpike and smashed into a tree.

The driver and head coach Kristina Quigley were killed and many others were treated for various injuries.

State police are still investigating but were not sure what caused the bus to leave the road.

Quigley, who was six months pregnant was flown to a hospital after the accident but died there from her injuries.

Her unborn child did not survive

The driver, Anthony Guaetta was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash.

 

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