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Local
More Tulsa car windows shot out
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More Tulsa car windows shot out

More Tulsa car windows shot out
Photo Credit: Fox23
Broken car window

More Tulsa car windows shot out

A rise in car burglaries over the past month in midtown Tulsa has people wondering how to protect themselves.
 
Most of them have been between 31st and 51st streets and from Peoria to Harvard. Police say it’s a crime of opportunity. Burglars walk along the street, casually glance in car windows, see if there’s anything to steal, then smash and grab and go.
 
But in some cases they’re just smashing without the grab.
 
“We heard something about 3:30 in the morning and a car was really loud outside, but we didn’t get up. And my husband left real early the next morning to go to the airport, and the back window of his truck had been busted out,” said Angie Ray, a victim.
 
Ray knows she isn’t the only victim in the area in the past week.
 
“He brought his computer and everything in, so nothing was stolen. That hassle of just getting your window fixed and all that,” she said. We checked with Tulsa police and found out in the two-week period from July 1-15 there were no reported car burglaries in the area.
 
Over the next two weeks there were three reported and in the past two weeks up to today there were six reported.
 
And the majority of car break-ins aren’t usually reported.
 
“It’s really hard to say if this is a trend, per se. You have individuals that maybe had their car broken into might not report it. You know, is this a case where more people are reporting the incidents?” said Officer Leland Ashley with Tulsa police.
 
Victims say a big problem is that a lot of time they’re not even finding anything to steal, they break the window, then don’t find anything worth taking.

"The windows are tinted, so they probably couldn’t, really tinted, so at night I’m sure they couldn’t see whether anything was in there or not and so they were probably looking. But thank goodness we didn’t have anything of value,” said Ray.
 
Since she didn’t even hear the breaking glass when it happened she doesn’t think there’s much she could have done differently but in the future, 

“We might clean out the other side of the garage and keep everyone’s car in. Yeah, that may be the deal."
 
Police said the majority of car break-ins happen because people leave things out in view, so make sure you leave nothing in the car, not even shoes or a jacket.

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