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Mom dies to save her baby
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Mom dies to save her baby

Mom dies to save her baby

Mom dies to save her baby

Elizabeth Joice beat cancer back in 2010.

Doctors told her the chemotherapy would leave her infertile. She and her husband were beyond joyed to find out she was pregnant last year.

The joy was short-lived, though, as she found out her cancer had returned just a month into her pregnancy. Tumors were removed from her back, but doctors could not verify if they got it all without a full-body MRI.

The dyes used in the scan, though, could hurt the baby. Joice had to choose between terminating the pregnancy to beat her own cancer or keep the baby and risk the cancer spreading.

Joice opted to keep the baby and take the risk. She started having trouble breathing in her third trimester and tumors were found in her lungs.

On Jan. 23, Joice had a baby girl, Lily. But the joy of that day was followed by tumors being found in her abdomen during the C-section. More tumors were later found in her heart and pelvis.

Joice died six weeks later on March 9. Her doctor remembers her words the day Lily was born.

“This is worth it ... I would do it all again to have this child.” Joice said.

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