ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
70°
Broken Clouds
H 77° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    70°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 77° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    77°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 77° L 59°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    81°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 84° L 57°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
Manning pleads guily to some, not all charges
Close

Manning pleads guily to some, not all charges

Manning pleads guily to some, not all charges
Photo Credit: File

Manning pleads guily to some, not all charges

FORT MEADE, Md. —

Bradley Manning, the Army private arrested in the biggest leak of classified material in U.S. history, pleaded guilty Thursday to charges that could send him to prison for 20 years, saying he was trying to expose the American military's "bloodlust" and disregard for human life in  and Afghanistan.

Military prosecutors said they plan to move forward with a court-martial on 12 remaining charges against him, including aiding the enemy, which carries a potential life sentence.

"I began to become depressed at the situation we found ourselves mired in year after year. In attempting counterinsurgency operations, we became obsessed with capturing and killing human targets on lists," the 25-year-old former intelligence analyst in Baghdad told a military judge.

He added: "I wanted the public to know that not everyone living in Iraq were targets to be neutralized."

It was the first time Manning directly admitted leaking the material to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks and detailed the frustrations that led him to do it.

The slightly built soldier from Crescent, Okla., read from a 35-page statement through his wire-rimmed glasses for more than an hour. He spoke quickly and evenly, showing little emotion even when he described how troubled he was by what he had seen.

The judge, Col. Denise Lind, accepted his plea to 10 charges involving illegal possession or distribution of classified material. Manning was allowed to plead guilty under military regulations instead of federal espionage law, which knocked the potential sentence down from 92 years.

He will not be sentenced until his court-martial on the other charges is over.

Manning admitted sending hundreds of thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan battlefield reports, State Department diplomatic cables, other classified records and two battlefield video clips to WikiLeaks in 2009 and 2010. WikiLeaks posted some of the material, embarrassing the U.S. and its allies.

He said he was disturbed by the conduct of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and the way American troops treated the populace. He said he did not believe the release of the information he downloaded onto a thumb drive would harm the U.S.

"I believed that if the general public, especially the American public, had access to the information ... this could spark a domestic debate on the role of the military and our foreign policy in general," Manning said.

Manning said he was appalled by 2007 combat video of an assault by a U.S. helicopter that killed 11 men, including a Reuters news photographer. The Pentagon concluded the troops mistook the camera equipment for weapons.

"The most alarming aspect of the video to me was the seemingly delightful bloodlust the aerial weapons team happened to have," Manning said, adding that the soldiers' actions "seemed similar to a child torturing ants with a magnifying glass."

As for the State Department cables, he said they "documented backdoor deals and criminality that didn't reflect the so-called leader of the free world."

"I thought these cables were a prime example of the need for a more open diplomacy," Manning said. "I believed that these cables would not damage the United States. However, I believed these cables would be embarrassing."

The battlefield reports were the first documents Manning decided to leak. He said he sent them to WikiLeaks after contacting The Washington Post and The New York Times. He said he felt a reporter at the Post didn't take him seriously, and a message he left for news tips at the Times was not returned.

Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy said Thursday of the purported phone call: "This is news to us."

The Obama administration has said the release of the documents threatened valuable military and diplomatic sources and strained America's relations with other governments. The administration has aggressively pursued people accused of leaking classified material, and Manning's is the highest-profile case.

Manning has been embraced by some left-leaning activists as a whistle-blowing hero whose actions exposed war crimes and helped trigger the Middle Eastern pro-democracy uprisings known as the Arab Spring in 2010. He has spent more than 1,000 days in custody.

The soldier told the court that he corresponded online with someone he believed to be WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange but never confirmed the person's identity.

WikiLeaks has been careful never to confirm or deny Manning was the source of the documents.

Reached by telephone in Britain on Thursday, Assange would not say whether he had any dealings with Manning but called him a political prisoner and said his prosecution was part of an effort by the U.S. to clamp down on criticism of its military and foreign policy.

Assange himself remains under investigation by the U.S. and has been holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London for the better part of a year to avoid extradition to Sweden on sex-crimes allegations.

___

Associated Press Writer Raphael Satter in London contributed to this report.

___

Follow Ben Nuckols on Twitter at

Copyright The Associated Press

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Mohamed Sanu was on a flight to New Jersey recently, and nothing bad happened! In fact, it was really good! That's news in itself nowadays. Yahoo Sports says he got a handwritten note from a couple who was sitting behind him with their 10-year-old son. It said the boy was watching how polite Sanu was to everyone and even noting Sanu's healthy snack choices. They say he made a very positive impression on their son and that he should be proud. Sanu tweeted a picture of the note and said it definitely made him smile. You can read more about the story here.
  • A 12-year-old boy who was trying to drive across Australia was stopped by police 800 miles into his journey, the BBC reported. >> Read more trending news The boy was pulled over near the mining town of Broken Hill in the New South Wales outback on Saturday after a patrol noticed the car's bumper dragging on the ground. Police said the boy had been trying to drive from Kendall in New South Wales to Perth in Western Australia. He was arrested and taken to the Broken Hill police station, the BBC reported. His parents, who had reported him missing, picked him up Sunday, the BBC reported. Detective Inspector Kim Fehon told the Evening Standard that the boy had taken the family car. “His parents reported him missing immediately after he left home, so they were looking for him.”  It was likely the boy would be charged under the Young Offenders Act in connection with three offenses, including failing to pay for gasoline and driving without a license, police told The Guardian.
  • Investigators don’t know exactly how many rape kits haven’t been processed because there isn’t a system in place to track them. Governor Mary Fallin’s office says it is estimated that only a quarter of rape kits are tested, leaving thousands of untested kits in police department warehouses across the state. On Monday, Governor Fallin announced the formation of the Oklahoma Task Force on Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence to address the backlog. It’s an issue Sen. Kay Floyd has been working to address this session.  “Frankly, we don’t know what the numbers are and that’s the point of doing a study,” said Floyd, D-Oklahoma City.   Task Force appointed by the governor are: Lesley March, the chief of the attorney general’s victim services unit, or her designee Danielle Tudor, a survivor of sexual assault with experience with sexual assault forensic evidence kit collection Kathy Bell, a sexual assault nurse examiner Andrea Swiech, Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation director of forensic science services, a person designated by the director of the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation who has expertise in the analysis of sexual assault forensic evidence kits Jan Peery, chief executive officer of YWCA of Oklahoma City, a person with experience seeking and applying for grants and other private funding Phil Cotton, the executive director of the Oklahoma Sheriff and Peace Officers Association, or his designee Bill Citty, chief of the Oklahoma City Police Department, or his designee Chuck Jordan, chief of the Tulsa Police Department, or his designee Ray McNair, executive director of the Oklahoma Association of Chiefs of Police, or his designee Bob Ravitz, an attorney from a public defender’s office with criminal defense experience Karla Doctor, senior director of sexual violence prevention response, a sexual assault victims’ advocate from a community-based organization Trent Baggett, executive coordinator of the Oklahoma District Attorneys Council, or his designee; Dawn Stover, executive director of the Native Alliance Against Violence, or her designee; Two nonvoting members from among the members of the Senate, of which may not be from the same political party; and Two nonvoting members from among the members of the House of Representatives, of which may not be from the same
  • The Chicago attorney who is representing the man who was forcibly dragged from a recent United Airlines flight, now has another airline passenger as a client. >> Read more trending news  Thomas Demetrio is now representing the mother who was boarding a recent American Airlines flight. The mother claims her stroller was forcibly taken from her, nearly hitting her and her child. Demetrio made the announcement Monday morning during an interview on the “Today Show.” An argument between a passenger and flight crew members was recorded and posted to social media. It has since gone viral. On the video, the crying woman can be heard asking for her stroller. American Airlines said she tried to bring a double-wide stroller down the aisle of the plane. She said she forgot that she had to check the stroller and tried to bring it with her, WFAA reported. The passenger who recorded the video said that the flight attendant acted angry. “He was very upset. He grabbed it and just pulled it off, sorta violently yanked it and then stormed off the plane with it,” Surian Adyanthaya told WFAA. A male passenger confronted the flight attendant, who told him to stay out of the situation. The flight attendant has been 'removed from duty” during American’s investigation and the airline upgraded the woman and her children to first class for the remainder of her trip, CNN reported. As for the man who was dragged from the United Airlines flight earlier this month, Demetrio said that Dr. David Dao is both emotionally and physically hurt.
  • The former District Attorney for Tulsa County announced Monday he will seek the office of U.S. Representative for Oklahoma’s 1st Congressional District. The seat is currently held by Rep. Jim Bridenstine, who has so far stuck to his pledge to serve three terms and step down.  And, as Harris mentioned Monday, Bridenstine is potentially going to take the top job at NASA. That would lead to a special election to fill his Congressional seat, so Harris felt the time was right to gear up for a campaign. Harris first signaled his intent to KRMG several months ago, saying he still felt called to serve. But asked Monday when he first seriously thought about running for Congress, he said he’s been contemplating the idea for a long time. “The truthful answer to that is, I’ve been mulling this over for 19 years,” he told KRMG. In his remarks to those assembled to hear his official announcement on the 8th floor of the Tulsa County Courthouse, he said he finally decided the time was right. “When your education, and your background, and your family and your experiences all converge to a moment in time when it becomes absolutely crystal clear what your next direction is, what your purpose is, what your plan is - that’s what brings me before you today,” Harris said. Harris went to work at the Tulsa County DA’s office right out of law school.  After twelve years, he was elected as District Attorney, an office which he held for 16 years.  Several other names have been bandied about as possible contenders for the 1st District, including former Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett and former Oklahoma House Speaker T. W. Shannon.