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Local News

    A man is arrested for DUI and assault with a deadly weapon after crashing his pickup into a house. TPD says 38-year old Beau Buckman drove into a residence near 31st and Memorial. His truck went through the garage before entering the home around 10:30 p.m. Sunday. No one was injured, but damage to the house is considerable. Buckman's jail bonds total $31,000.
  • Monday morning, Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma will introduce a bill that would protect young people who were brought into the country illegally by their parents from facing deportation. Earlier this month, President Trump ordered the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative to be shut down after six months. It protected an estimated 700,000 people - nicknamed “dreamers” - from facing deportation; that includes roughly 7,500 people in Oklahoma. The nickname comes from the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, which provides a path to citizenship. As Sen. Lankford has pointed out, they didn’t choose to come to the U.S. illegally. “Their parents did something illegal, they crossed a border. The children came with their parents, they had no choice on it,” he said this week. Deporting them, he says, would be unfair. “They don’t know their home country that they were born in, they only know this country,” Lankford said. “So we’re trying to get a reasoned response to say ‘what is a good way to be able to solve this permanently?’ so there’s not this constant churn for them, and fear of this, unresolved.” He has worked on that solution for weeks, along with Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC). The solution they have struck would be to offer the “dreamers” a green card - in other words, allowing them to live permanently and legally in the United States, during which time they could work on becoming a citizen. Lankford says President Trump supports the Tillis-Lankford bill. “President Trump believes there should be a permanent solution that’s a legislative solution, that provides some semblance of certainty.” Certainty being something few of those affected by the decision to rescind DACA have experienced in recent weeks.
  • Tulsa police are investigating a shooting near 51st and Yale at the Charleston Heights apartments. A woman called 911 at 3:39 a.m. Monday after hearing three or four gunshots in the hallway at 5535 East 47 Place. Tulsa Police Sergeant Richard Muelenberg said, “We think that the motivation for the shooting was a robbery. There are multiple suspects involved. We have two black males and a couple of Hispanic males that we know of. We don’t have a lot of details at this time.” The victim was taken to the hospital. “The victim is in stable condition. He will undergo surgery for a round that is still embedded in his body.”  No one has been arrested yet.
  • A road project to replace some cable barriers begins Monday on Highway 75. Left lanes will be closed at various times in both north and southbound directions between 131st and 151st Street South Monday through Thursday until the installation is completed in the Spring. The closures will be in effect at different times during the day. Check with ODOT's website for more information.
  • A defense attorney who represented Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh and witnessed his 2001 execution, has died after battling cancer. Rob Nigh was 57. Stephen Jones, McVeigh's lead defense attorney, said Nigh died on Sunday, months after stepping down as Tulsa County's chief public defender for serious health issues.  Known for his encyclopedic legal knowledge, work ethic and intense preparation on every case he handled, Nigh also defended those accused of committing some of the state's most egregious crimes.  Nigh defended two men who randomly killed three black residents in Tulsa in 2012. One of two then-teenage brothers was accused of killing five family members in their home in 2015. Nigh also defended a man accused of fatally shooting his Lebanese neighbor in 2016 because of his race.
  • State legislators begin a special session today. The Oklahoma Legislature is headed back to the state Capitol for a special legislative session to fill a $215 million shortfall in the state budget. They will also look for long-term solutions to the state's chronic budget shortfalls. Gov. Mary Fallin scheduled today's special session just four months after lawmakers adjourned their regular session after adopting a new $1.50-per-pack 'fee' on cigarettes in an effort to fill the state's latest budget gap.
  • A music festival was held in Wagoner on Saturday and the proceeds are going to a good cause. Organizers tell us they raised more than $12,000 to improve the downtown area after a fire wrecked five Main Street buildings over the summer. “Anything we can do to bond together as a town to fix what happened, you can’t really ask for better,” one organizer said.   Organizers are already planning to hold the festival again next year. For reference, a cause for the fire was never determined.
  • Around 30 churches participated in a prayer and unity rally in north Tulsa on Saturday. The event drew 150 people who spoke against violence, crime, and the lack of economic opportunities in their communities. “It’s time for a revival among our young people,” one resident said. Also, monthly meetings have been held since the double murder at Crawford Park. What do you think can be done to stop violence in north Tulsa?  
  • A 64-year-old Oklahoma City man was recently taken into custody after he showed up at a Dave & Buster's looking to have sex with a 14-year-old boy. An OKC newspaper reports Harry Wheeler responded to an ad on Craigslist. Wheeler assumed he was speaking with an underage boy. 'I just checked statutory rape laws in Oklahoma,' he reportedly said according to the complaint obtained by the newspaper. 'I could go to jail for 5 years to life, so what we will be doing later, we must keep it a secret.' He was actually communicating with an undercover agent. Once in custody, Wheeler admitted he was planning on having sex with the underage teenager.
  • A burglary suspect was taken into custody on Saturday thanks to a watchful neighbor. The occurrence happened near 5th and Yale. Tulsa police tell us they recieved a call from the man’s girlfriend.  “The caller advised that her boyfriend caught someone breaking into their neighbor’s car and her boyfriend apprehended the suspect,” police said.  “Officers arrived to take the suspect into custody.” A short time later, the unidentified 20-year-old became chatty with investigators.   “The suspect was Mirandized and confessed to ‘less than 10’ burglary from vehicles,” police said.  “He was in possession of a couple pieces of other victims’ mail and other personal property.  Officers were able to locate one additional victim in addition to the original victim.” He was taken to the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • Looking for ways to deal with hundreds of thousands of younger illegal immigrants who were brought to the United States by their parents, a group of Republican Senators introduced a plan on Monday which would let those “Dreamers” remain in the U.S. legally, but wait up to fifteen years in line with others who are seeking American citizenship. “This is not an amnesty bill where we take those individuals and just say, we’re going to give you a quick route to citizenship, and ignore the realities of what happened coming in,” said Sen. James Lankford (R-OK). “They were children, many of them were two or three years old when they came,” Lankford told a news conference at the Capitol. “They’ve grown up in this country, they know no other place.” Sen. Tillis and Sen. Lankford introducing “succeed act”- bill offers merit-based pathway for dreamers to stay in the US pic.twitter.com/NSkU0aGGEu — Dorey Scheimer (@DoreyScheimer) September 25, 2017 The plan from Lankford, Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC), and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), would not allow “Dreamers” to bring in relatives during that 15 year wait for possible citizenship – as critics worry it will mean ‘chain migration’ once those younger illegal immigrants are allowed to stay in the U.S. legally. Lankford made clear this bill to deal with the “DACA” children should not be considered on its own, but only as part of a broader Congressional deal on immigration matters. “This individual piece is not designed to be a stand-alone,” Lankford said, rattling off issues like border security, programs to stop companies from hiring illegal immigrants, and cracking down on people who enter the country legally, but then stay longer than their visa allows them to be in the U.S.
  • U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact. Today, health care is based on averages, what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients. The massive “All of Us” project instead will push what’s called precision medicine, using traits that make us unique to forecast health and treat disease. The goal is to end cookie-cutter health care. A pilot is under way now. If all goes well, the National Institutes of Health plans to open enrollment early next year. Participants will get DNA tests, and report on their diet, sleep, exercise and numerous other health-affecting factors. It’s a commitment: The study aims to run for at least 10 years.
  • A kayaker found a grain bag containing six puppies floating in a river Sunday in Uxbridge. >> Read more trending newsThe bag was tied up and the puppies were dumped in the river and left for dead, police said. Uxbridge animal control was called to the scene and took the puppies. All of them are expected to be OK and are being taken care of. The puppies are receiving the necessary care, and will be available for adoption after they have been medically cleared. Uxbridge Police do not have any suspects yet.
  • Some Target workers will be getting more money in their paychecks starting next month. The company announced that starting in October, it will be paying at least $11 an hour, up a dollar from its current $10 an hour minimum wage, CNBC reported. But the retail chain isn’t stopping there. Company officials are promising that the pay will be increased to $15 by 2020. Target is answering Walmart’s pay increase last year to $10 an hour, Reuters reported. Target has promised that the minimum pay rate will apply to 100,000 temporary workers it will hire for the holiday shopping season, CNBC reported. Currently, Target employs 323,000 people at more than 1,800 stores. Earlier this year, Sen. Bernie Sanders introduced a bill that would raise federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. The current federal minimum wage is set at $7.25 an hour.
  • It appeared no drivers, crew or other team members participated in a protest during the national anthem to start the NASCAR Cup series race Sunday. >> Read more trending newsSeveral team owners and executives said they wouldn’t tolerate anyone in their organizations protesting. They could be fired if they had. “It’ll get you a ride on a Greyhound bus,” Richard Childress, who was Dale Earnhardt’s long time team owner, said of protesting. “Anybody that works for me should respect the country we live in. So many people gave their lives for it. This is America.” As the NFL, NBA and MLB have seen players, owners and teams protest and remark on social media in the wake of President Donald Trump's comments Friday and throughout the weekend about athletes who peacefully protest during the national anthem, several NASCAR owners weighed in. Richard Petty was asked if drivers protesting during the anthem would be fired, and he said, “You’re right.” “Anybody that don’t stand up for the anthem oughta be out of the country. Period. What got ’em where they’re at? The United States,” Petty said. The Associated Press contributed to this report.