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Isaac headed northwest toward Oklahoma

Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Tulsa say Thursday will be a transition day of sorts across eastern Oklahoma as the path of Tropical Storm Isaac becomes clearer.

The NWS issued a special weather statement that says the showers and thunderstorms will become widespread across eastern Oklahoma Thursday night into Friday.

The heaviest rain is expected to be across northwest Arkansas where one to three inches of rain is possible.

News On 6 Meteorologist Travis Meyer says, “The storm track is expected to be centered right along the Arkansas-Oklahoma border areas, which means most of the threat of strong to severe thunderstorms and heavy rain unfortunately to the east of that while we’ll see lighter precipitation in Oklahoma.”

There is still some uncertainty with respect to the potential path of Isaac.

Travis says, "It'll be near Fort Smith toward the morning hours which will leave us with an increasing chance of rain, showers and thundershowers toward about four to six a.m. for our Friday morning."

Any shift in the expected track could bring more or less rainfall to the area.

Trav says, “Looks like on the backside of this system will render us about a half inch of rain maybe isolated amounts of near an inch, but little or no chance of severe weather.”

We could start to see the weather change by Thursday afternoon.

“We’ll see some increasing clouds from Isaac, or the leftovers of it anyway, by the time we get into late this afternoon.”

The chance for rain will continue through the overnight hours.

“Our best chance of rain will not initiate until about three to four o’clock in the morning and we should see some periods of off and on rain tomorrow. Could be moderate to heavy, but not expected to be severe.”

Strong gusty winds will be possible with gusts of 30 to 40 mph possible Thursday night and into Friday across much of eastern Oklahoma.

The showers and thunderstorms are expected to end from southwest to northwest on Saturday as the remnants of Isaac pull off to the northeast.

The increased cloud cover will keep temperatures down a few degrees from Wednesday.

The KRMG storm center is staffed and ready to go in case the weather does turn severe.

Tune in to AM 740 and FM 102.3 Newstalk KRMG or check Back here at KRMG.com for any new developments.

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