ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
59°
Overcast
H 77° L 62°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    59°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 77° L 62°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    70°
    Afternoon
    Cloudy. H 77° L 62°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    74°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 77° L 62°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
OK Insurance Commissioner to ride along with OHP, touts new law
Close

OK Insurance Commissioner to ride along with OHP, touts new law

OK Insurance Commissioner to ride along with OHP, touts new law
Photo Credit: Russell Mills
The path taken by the blue car as it plowed through several vehicles.

OK Insurance Commissioner to ride along with OHP, touts new law

Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak has established a Thanksgiving tradition of riding along with Oklahoma Highway Patrol troopers.

This year, he'll climb into an OHP patrol car at midnight on Thursday and spend a couple hours on the roads around Tulsa.

He has two primary reasons, he told KRMG in an exclusive interview.

"Every Thanksgiving I have formed the habit of riding with the Highway Patrol, really to say thank you to them," he said. "They work very, very hard for Oklahomans."

But his second purpose is to raise awareness of uninsured drivers on the roads, and the dangers they pose to the law-abiding public.

"This is also an opportunity to draw a little attention to the over 564,000 drivers on the Oklahoma roads that will be out driving that do not have insurance. We'll be riding along, learning how the process works and having an opportunity to see firsthand how the Oklahoma Highway Patrol interacts."

Soon, those troopers and other police agencies will have a new tool to use to crack down on uninsured drivers.

"It's going into effect January 1st," Doak told KRMG.

The law actually took effect Nov. 1, but the Insurance Commission and other agencies needed more time to figure out exactly how to implement it.

It allows officers to remove the tags of uninsured vehicles, and forces the owner to purchase "forced place insurance," basically a 10-day liability insurance. 

Doak says Louisiana passed a similar law, and saw the rate of uninsured drivers go from about 30 percent to about 12 percent.

He adds that state minimum liability coverage costs an average of about $700 a year -- less than $60 a month.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • A doctor has been fired from practice at a hospital. A not-guilty plea has been entered for a Detroit-area doctor charged with performing genital mutilation on two Minnesota girls in a first-of-its-kind case in the United States.   Dr. Jumana Nagarwala appeared in Detroit federal court Thursday, a day after being indicted.   She's charged with six crimes, including conspiracy to bring the girls across state lines. It carries a minimum sentence of 10 years in prison.   Nagarwala is charged with performing genital mutilation on the two 7-year-old girls in February at a suburban Detroit clinic owned by another doctor, who also is charged.   Nagarwala and the Minnesota girls' families belong to a Muslim sect called Dawoodi Bohra. Defense attorney Shannon Smith says she performed a religious ritual, not genital mutilation.   
  • An attorney is calling an execution “horrifying.” The last of four Arkansas executions over an eight-day period has prompted calls for investigations after the inmate lurched and convulsed while strapped to the gurney.   An Associated Press reporter who witnessed Kenneth Williams' execution Thursday said that about three minutes into the lethal injection, his body jerked 15 times in quick succession. He lurched violently against the leather chest restraint, then the rate slowed for a final five movements.   One of Williams' attorneys called the execution 'horrifying.' A spokesman for Gov. Asa Hutchinson called it 'an involuntary muscular reaction.'   The compressed lethal injection timeline could attract more scrutiny after Williams' death. Arkansas sought to carry out as many lethal injections as possible before one of its drugs expires Sunday.
  • When Judge James Robart of Seattle blocked his travel ban: His reactions to news reports about alleged Russian interference in the elections, and possible Trump business ties to Russia: He clearly didn’t like how coverage of his campaign was handled on the FOX NEWS show “The O’Reilly Factor” in early 2016: He used the official POTUS Twitter account to blast the media: In March, Trump Tweeted the claim that former President Obama had his “wires tapped” in Trump Tower:  He used the POTUS account to Tweet about FBI Director James Comey, literally while Comey was testifying before Congress: This POTUS Tweet was incorrect - 113 of those Jihadists were actually released by the Bush administration: Not accurate, the MS-13 gang has been around since the 1980s: His response to protesters who want him to release his tax returns:
  • The public can be going in style in the Big Apple. In a park amid New York City skyscrapers, a gem has emerged: a posh public bathroom that cost nearly $300,000.   It has freshly delivered flowers, imported tiles, classical music and artwork.   The free-of-charge facility was inspired by visits to the city's priciest hotels. It's open to everyone, even homeless New Yorkers.   On Thursday, officials cut bathroom tissue as the inaugural ribbon for the toilets housed in a landmarked Beaux-Arts building behind the New York Public Library. The toilets - divided between the women's and men's sides - are reopening after a two-month renovation.   The eye-popping elegance is a surprise in a city where public toilets are scarce and generally grungy.   The public luxury was funded privately by the Bryant Park Corp., a not-for-profit that manages the city-owned park.
  • A dog attack is fatal for its owner. Police say a pit bull mix killed its owner during an attack on the deck of the woman's Pennsylvania home.   Police say they were called to the home in Upper Macungie Township Thursday afternoon by neighbors who reported hearing screaming and a dog barking.   Police say the dog was still attacking the woman when officers arrived. They managed to put the dog in the home so responders could treat the woman's severe injuries.   She was taken to a hospital where she later died.   The name of the woman, who was in her 30s, is being withheld until family members are notified.   Police say the 3-year-old male pit bull-boxer mix was tranquilized on the scene and taken to the Lehigh County Humane Society where it will be euthanized.