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Girls and guns come together tonight in Tulsa
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Girls and guns come together tonight in Tulsa

Girls and guns come together tonight in Tulsa
Photo Credit: Getty Images
Hand gun

Girls and guns come together tonight in Tulsa

Females and Firearms come together and the results are explosive.

The Well-Armed Woman organization opened its first Oklahoma chapter nine months ago in Tahlequah.

Since then, an Oklahoma City chapter has opened.

Tonight the Broken Arrow - Tulsa chapter begins with a chapter in Muskogee also getting underway.

Leaders tell KRMG the Broken Arrow-Tulsa chapter will give women of all experience levels the opportunity to be introduced to issues important to women shooters, learn safe gun handling skills and train together.

The Well Armed Woman's first meeting is at the 2A Shooting Center at 4616 E. Admiral Place in Tulsa at 5:00 P.M.

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