ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
89°
Mostly Sunny
H 93° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    89°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 93° L 76°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Evening
    Mostly Sunny. H 93° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    77°
    Morning
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 89° L 67°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
Gas prices may spike in August
Close

Gas prices may spike in August

Gas prices may spike in August
Photo Credit: Shelby Travis
File photo

Gas prices may spike in August

The price for regular gasoline decreased a few cents this week.

However, we could be in for more dramatic price swings this month.

Experts with AAA Oklahoma say it will depend on the potential for late-summer hurricanes and refinery problems.

Analysts say these types of issues can disrupt production, distribution and gasoline supply at a time when many Americans are filling up their tanks for late summer travel.

Gas prices in August 2012 increased 33 cents per gallon due to significant refinery outages and the impact of Hurricane Isaac along the Gulf Coast.

The Oklahoma average price of self-serve regular gasoline increased 19 cents in July.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes.  The sinking of the Indianapolis remains the Navy's single worst loss at sea. The fate of its crew - nearly 900 were killed, many by sharks, and just 316 survived - was one of the Pacific war's more horrible and fascinating tales.  The expedition crew of Research Vessel Petrel, which is owned by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it located the wreckage of the Indianapolis on the floor of the North Pacific Ocean, more than 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) below the surface, the U.S. Navy said in a news release Saturday. 'To be able to honor the brave men of the USS Indianapolis and their families through the discovery of a ship that played such a significant role in ending World War II is truly humbling,' Allen said in the news release. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945.  It sank in 12 minutes, killing about 300. Survivors were left in the water, most of them with only life jackets.  There was no time to send a distress signal, and four days passed before a bomber on routine patrol happened to spot the survivors in the water.  By the time rescuers arrived, a combination of exposure, dehydration, drowning and constant shark attacks had left only one-fourth of the ship's original number alive.
  • Monday marks the first time in nearly 100 years that a total solar eclipse will be visible from the continental U.S.  >> Read more trending news The 10 best locations to watch the eclipse across the country can be found here, but if getting to one of those cities isn’t possible, NASA is hosting two four-hour live-streams covering the event. NASA’s live coverage will begin at 11:45 a.m. ET.  Watch NASA’s live streams below. >> Solar eclipse 2017: What time does it start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it Debbie Lord contributed to this report.
  • The August 21 Great American Solar Eclipse will be the first total solar eclipse to stretch coast to coast in the continental United States in 99 years. Humans are expected to react with amazement when the thin path of totality, or total eclipse, passes through portions of 14 states, but what about their pets? RELATED: The ultimate guide to the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse this August Dogs and cats will be affected by the eclipse much less than wildlife, according to Russell McLendon, science editor for Mother Nature Network. But there are still important things to know about how the solar eclipse could affect dogs and cats, including safety measures responsible owners should take.  Here are five of the most important things to know about how the solar eclipse could affect your pet: Cats and dogs may not notice the solar eclipse much.  Many wild animals may mistake solar eclipses for twilight, McLendon wrote in MNN. Crickets and frogs may jump start their evening chorus, diurnal animals might quiet down and even nocturnal animals like bats and owls might be lured into activity in the eclipse's totality.  While they can't anticipate the eclipse phenomena like humans who read about it ahead of time, family pets are unlikely to have a primeval reaction to the eclipse like their wild animal relatives. They react differently, because their daily routines are influenced by human schedules as well as sunlight levels, McLendon reported. RELATED: Can’t find eclipse glasses anywhere? Make these DIY pinhole cameras, projectors instead Pets may still become fearful during the eclipse.  More than the darkness of the solar eclipse, pets may be apprehensive about the crowds that gather to view it, according to Lloyd Nelson, an Illinois animal-control officer interviewed by the Southern Illinoisan. Be aware that your dog or cat could get spooked by solar eclipse-inspired events that involve crowds of people, whether you take a pet with you to a viewing spot or it's near your home.  'It's sort of like the Fourth of July, but tripled,' said Nelson. 'We are going to have concerts, people shooting off fireworks in the dark of the midday sun, loud noises and strangers.'  Just as you do during firework holidays, make sure your pet is either safe inside for the eclipse or on a leash and under careful watch. Pets can suffer 'eclipse blindness.' One thing we do have in common with our pets is that human, canine and feline eyes can all suffer from 'eclipse blindness' when safe precautions are not taken during the eclipse viewing. During the eclipse, as the moon's shadow starts to block the sun's light, some of the sun's fiery disk will still be visible, according to LiveScience.com . A view of that light can literally burn any eyes, human or cat or dog, that look up at it.  RELATED: A solar eclipse can blind you — here’s how to stay safe during August’s Great American Eclipse The condition, commonly called 'eclipse blindness,' happens when the sun's powerful rays burn sensitive photoreceptor cells in the retina. It usually results in blurred vision and other vision loss instead of complete blindness, since humans and animals ordinarily turn away before complete blindness occurs. Pet's don't necessarily need glasses, but it wouldn't hurt. Space.com's safe viewing recommendations for humans include proper eye protection from NASA-approved eclipse glasses, along with strict warnings against trying to view the partial eclipse with a camera or telescope. Whether your dog or cat also needs the glasses is up for debate in the scientific community. Mike Reynolds, an astronomy professor at Floriday State College in Jacksonville, Florida, told LiveScience.com that it's best to outfit pets who will be out during the eclipse with protective glasses. Another expert quoted in the article wasn't as concerned. 'On a normal day, your pets don't try to look at the sun, and therefore don't damage their eyes,' said Angela Speck, director of astronomy and a professor of astrophysics at the University of Missouri. 'And on this day, they're not going to do it, either,' Animal lovers can help with worldwide research. While it's unlikely that your dog or cat will have a remarkable reaction to the Great American Eclipse, pet lovers might enjoy observing how animals in the wild or even the neighborhood do unusual things. Previous eclipses worldwide have involved reports of night birds singing, bats flying, spiders tearing down webs or owls calling, according to a report in the Southern Illinoisan. But because total solar eclipses are so infrequent, scientists have little beyond anecdotal evidence of animal behavior, Rebecca Johnson, citizen science research coordinator at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, told the paper. To remedy the dearth of research, the academy created a 'Life Responds' project where citizens all over the world download the iNaturalist app from Apple or Android platforms and document the plant and animal reactions they see during the eclipse. To join in the fun, download the iNaturalist app, make an account and practice making observations before the eclipse using the project 'Getting Started' guide.
  • The Great American Eclipse on Monday is expected to draw millions of Americans to cities along the centerline path of totality, where the moon completely blocks the sun, the earth goes dark and the sun’s corona shimmers in the blackened sky. And with all the hype surrounding the total eclipse, you’re probably wondering if you can sneak a selfie in during the mega celestial event. While we (along with most professional experts) recommend you put your phones down and enjoy the brief, once-in-a-lifetime experience sans technology, wanting to capture the moment digitally is certainly tempting. >> How to photograph the solar eclipse  If you’re planning to take a selfie (or use your smartphone camera at all), Nathan Yanasak and Jeri Ann Beckworth, both in the Department of Radiology and Imaging at Augusta University’s Medical College of Georgia, have some advice. Eclipse selfie precautions and tips: Lower your expectations. The eclipse will look very small in your selfie. Focus on getting the wide views of the sky and atmosphere, along with the eclipse. >> Solar eclipse 2017: Your eyes will fry under normal sunglasses during 2017 eclipse, here’s why Keep your solar eclipse glasses on. Safety is paramount during an eclipse, especially during its partial phases. Don’t look directly at the sun and keep your safety equipment on just in case the sunlight begins to creep in again after totality. Limit your photos to the totality period. Yanasak and Beckworth recommend limiting selfies to the brief totality period, when your eyes will be safer and your camera settings will be easier to navigate. >> Solar eclipse 2017: Make your own 'pinhole projector' Be quick. Again, totality is brief — approximately 2 minutes and 30 seconds (or less). Snap your photos quickly, with enough time left over to breathe it all in.  Practice adjusting your camera’s control exposure settings. This is the most difficult part (aside from assuring safety) of capturing the eclipse in your selfie. Familiarize yourself with your phone’s camera settings and practice adjusting them during one of these two scenarios from Yanasak and Beckworth: >> On AJC.com: Complete coverage of the solar eclipse 1. Practice during a nearly full moon. Try to snap a picture where a nearly full moon fills half of the view and is not overexposed—it should appear as a grey disk with clear features. 2. Use two dark rooms with a 25W incandescent light bulb in a clip-on lamp. Set up the lamp in one room, wrapped in a single paper towel. Stand in the other room about 30 feet from the bulb to practice your picture. Practice in the evening, and close your curtains to avoid stray light from outside. >> Read more trending news Consider downloading an advanced phone app, such as ProCamera. Even with all the practice, your smartphone camera might not be as sophisticated or sufficient for exposure control. Download advanced camera apps that give you more exposure settings and features. Don’t zoom. Experts recommend using a wide-angle view and not the digital zoom on your phone while taking a selfie. Do you need a solar filter for your phone? According to NASA, solar filters must be attached to the front of any optics, including camera lenses. But that’s not the case for most GoPro and smartphone shots, because the shots will be wide-angle views. >> Solar eclipse 2017: What time does it start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it Apple told USA Today the iPhone camera sensor and lens would not be damaged during the solar eclipse, just as they wouldn’t be damaged if you pointed the camera toward the sun at any other time. This is because the iPhone camera (and that of other similar smartphones) have a 28mm wide angle, whereas larger Canon or Nikon DSLR cameras have large zooms with high multiplication. The GoPro lens is even wider at around 14mm. “Apple and others suggest shooting wide shots of the scene, capturing not only the eclipse, but also the atmosphere...and the amazing shadows that are naturally cast,” USA Today reported. >> What not to do the day of and during the total solar eclipse Because you won’t see as much of the sun in a still photo, consider taking a time lapse or video instead. How to actually take an eclipse selfie, according to Yanasak and Beckworth: Switch your flash from “Auto” to “On.” Turn on your front-facing camera so that you see yourself on the screen. Move around so that you position the moon over your shoulder. Use your right hand to adjust the exposure to the moon and hold. Use your left hand to take the photo. Now, put your phone away and enjoy the moment, whether you got the photo you wanted or not. Plan to photograph the eclipse? Here are general eclipse photography tips from NASA.
  • As Republicans talk about the need to act on major tax reform, the preparation for that mammoth undertaking pales in comparison to the last effort during the Reagan Administration, an exercise that took time to first develop legislative proposals, and then to wind their way through the House and Senate, as the bill experienced several near-death experiences before finally achieving victory in the fall of 1986. Here are some thoughts on the differences between 1986 and 2017. 1. Reagan vs Trump – 489 pages vs 1. The White House efforts on tax reform were much different when you look at President Ronald Reagan, who called for tax reform in his 1984 State of the Union Address. By November of 1984, the Treasury Department had finished a comprehensive study of different ideas on tax reform, and presented that to Mr. Reagan. In late May of 1985, the President spoke to the nation from the Oval Office, as he sent Congress a 489 page document, “The President’s Tax Proposals to the Congress for Fairness, Growth and Simplicity.” While President Trump mentioned tax reform in his first speech to a joint session of Congress back in February, the only thing produced so far by the Trump Administration is one page of bullet points on what he hopes to achieve with tax reform. Read through the Reagan document linked above – it is filled with excessive amounts of detail on what the President’s proposal would change, and the impact. None of that is available on even the limited goals of the Trump tax reform plan. 2. Treasury 1986 vs Treasury 2017. President Reagan had two main figures serve as Treasury Secretary during the development and passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1986. One was Don Regan, who left Treasury to take the job as White House Chief of Staff, trading positions with James Baker, as Baker took over the Treasury post for the drive to enact tax reform into law. Baker was a political operative who had worked for Gerald Ford and George H.W. Bush, while Regan was a Wall Street chieftain brought on by Reagan to serve in his administration. While you could maybe equate Regan to Trump Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin – because of their Wall Street backgrounds – Mnuchin has yet to prove that he belongs in the same sentence as Regan, who went on to become White House Chief of Staff to Reagan. Mnuchin predicted earlier this year that tax reform would be done by August. Reporters in the Capitol chuckled at the legislative innocence of that prediction. Flashback to Feb. 23: Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin thought tax reform could happen by the August break. https://t.co/8Ftu8caqxG https://t.co/cAYkqSmXjZ — Chris Clayton (@ChrisClaytonDTN) July 31, 2017 3. Congress 1986 vs Congress 2017. Just as we can compare the players in the administration, we can look at the rosters in Congress to see what might happen on tax reform. There were some big names involved in 1986 – Rostenkowski, Packwood, Tip, and Dole. Those are four major players in the modern history of Congress. Of the 2017 roster of Brady, Hatch, Ryan and McConnell, maybe only Mitch McConnell would be considered an equal of those 1986 lawmakers. When Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady emerges from H-208 in the Capitol, he is a jovial fellow, but he isn’t the old bull that Dan Rostenkowski was at the time of the 1986 tax bill. Maybe in 20 years, Speaker Paul Ryan will be an equal of former Speaker Tip O’Neill. This battle over taxes could go a long way to establishing reputations of these key GOP lawmakers. would love to see a metric on Ways & Means chairs and their power in respective congresses. Brady seems way weaker than say, Rostenkowski. — S Redding (@sreddi_515) March 24, 2017 4. Much more bipartisanship in 1986 than in 2017. One thing that is certainly hampering tax reform efforts this time around is how things have changed politically in the Congress. Back in 1986, tax reform was done with a big bipartisan effort. The final bill received 292 votes in the House and 74 in the Senate. That seems highly unlikely this time around, as it simply wouldn’t be acceptable to large blocks of voters in either party to have a bipartisan bill (even though it should be the goal). I talked with the son of a former big name GOP Congressman the other day, who lamented the vice that politicians are in nowadays, as he argued they don’t have the political leeway back home to make a bipartisan tax deal work. I’m not sure I agree with that. I still think experience is a big deal, and most Republicans have never been in this position on a major issue like tax reform. We just saw the difficulties that the GOP encountered with health care. Stay tuned. . 5. This is far bigger than the fight over health care. I cannot stress this enough. Yes, we had some well-heeled lobbyists involved in the health care fight. But it will go to another level when we get on to tax reform. 1100 Longworth and H-208 are room numbers that mean something very important in the context of the House of Representatives, and those rooms will be two very powerful destinations for lobbyists who want to impact the course of tax reform in coming months. Back in 1986, they called it “Gucci Gulch,” and reporter Jeff Birnbaum wrote a book about it, which is still important reading today. Interested in how tax reform occurred in 1986 & can be a model for 2017? I implore you to read this book. https://t.co/a17tli0tzZ — Jeffrey Margolin (@JeffreyMargolin) April 7, 2017 So, when you hear Republicans talk about tax reform, focus on one thing for now – when will see a real bill? Once that happens, then we can talk about actually passing legislation through the House and Senate, and getting that to the President’s desk. Before the first vote can be taken, Republicans also to figure out if they are doing tax reform via budget reconciliation (no filibuster in the Senate) or by the regular legislative process, where a filibuster is possible. A lot of work remains to be done – it seems unlikely that will happen before the end of 2017, but stay tuned.