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Faulty flip-flop and a camel, story of a car wreck
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Faulty flip-flop and a camel, story of a car wreck

Faulty flip-flop and a camel, story of a car wreck
Photo Credit: Jo-Don Farms
Eli the camel

Faulty flip-flop and a camel, story of a car wreck

Police say a woman was driving along when her flip-flop became entangled and sent her car barreling through a stop sign.

She plowed into a truck being driven by an employee of Jo-Don Farms, a local zoo.

 The story would end there were it not for the cargo inside the zoo vehicle. Eli the camel.

“Eli is perfectly fine. Not a mark on him. We checked him as soon as we got to the scene,” Jo-Don’s Kathy Meyer told Fox6 in Milwaukee.

However, the truck and its driver weren’t as lucky.

“The truck is totaled. The truck is done, Meyer began. The man driving “was one of our best staff that I am out right now. He won’t be able to work, and we need the truck,” Meyer continued.

The farm runs the animal rides at the Milwaukee zoo. With a holiday weekend coming up, the timing is rotten. “Eli has some jobs to help us with over this Labor Day weekend, Meyer noted. "We`re really busy."

The woman with the faulty flip-flop wasn’t hurt, but her wallet will take a hit. She was ticketed for failure to yield the right of way from a stop sign, causing injury.

More here.  

 

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