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Fake abduction decal creating outrage
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Fake abduction decal creating outrage

Fake abduction decal creating outrage
Photo Credit: Facebook
Tailgate sticker

Fake abduction decal creating outrage

The life size decal shows a woman lying on her side with her hands and feet bound and her blonde hair covering her face.

With just a glance at the back of a pickup it would easily look as though there was in fact, a woman tied up in the truck.

A marketing and advertising company in Waco, Texas called Hornet Signs, makes the product and was surprised by the reaction.

"I wasn't expecting the reactions we got, nor do we condone this by any means,” company owner Brad Kolb told KWTX-TV.

Kolb continued “it was more or less something we put out there to see who noticed it."

Looks like they got their answer.

“Abduction or any violence against women is not funny or cute,” one Waco resident said.

Several residents told the TV station they were fooled by the realistic sticker and called police.

Kolb said a female employee volunteered to be the model for the sticker and he took to Facebook Sunday to explain further.

"I believe that there has been some confusion out there in regards to this company selling what is on that truck. We have only made the one. It is not for sale and we have no plans on selling it or any others"

While the feedback has been largely negative Kolb confirms his company has seen a jump in sales for his business.

What do you think, good business move or bad taste?

More here.

 

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