Breaking News

Lockdown lifted at six Tulsa elementary schools after shooting in nearby neighborhood

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
51°
Overcast
H 57° L 41°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    51°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 57° L 41°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    57°
    Evening
    Mostly Cloudy. H 57° L 41°
  • clear-night
    42°
    Morning
    Clear. H 71° L 52°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
Exclusive: Tulsa scout leaders issue statement on gays in scouting
Close

Exclusive: Tulsa scout leaders issue statement on gays in scouting

Exclusive: Tulsa scout leaders issue statement on gays in scouting
Photo Credit: AP

Exclusive: Tulsa scout leaders issue statement on gays in scouting

 The question of sexual orientation isonce again at the forefront for the  Boy Scouts of America.  The national organization decided to reconsider the rule banning openly gay scouts and scout leaders but won’t make a decision until at least May.

The scouts have already dealt with this issue several times including the landmark case decided by the United States Supreme Court said in 2000. That was when it was decided that it was legal free speech by a private organization in the decision noted as Boy Scouts of America et al. v. Dale 530 US 640.

There are supporters of the ban who tell KRMG they are afraid many faith based charter organizations could pull out as sponsors but supporters have a different take.

They say a change could bring new blood into scouting at a time when fewer boys are joining and working for merit badges and higher level scout activities.

The Indian Nations Council of scouts in Tulsa released the following letter yesterday explaining where they stand on the issue as of now.

Please leave your remarks in the comments section below and vote on our poll as well before you leave the story.

 

February 6, 2013
 
Dear Volunteers, Supporters and Friends of Scouting,
 
This week we will celebrate Scouting’s 103rd anniversary, and our focus has remained the same, working together to deliver the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. 
 
Sexual orientation is one of the most complex and divisive issues in society today.  The BSA does not have an agenda on the matter, and discussing this issue is not the role of Scouting or the focus of the organization.  However, the BSA has become one of the focal points in society’s ongoing debate on the issue.
 
It is clear that no single policy will accommodate all viewpoints within the Scouting family on the issue.  Nor can Scouting be the place to resolve divergent viewpoints in society.
 
For 103 years, the Boy Scouts of America has been a part of the fabric of this nation, providing its youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.  In the past two weeks, Scouting has received an outpouring of feedback from the American public.  It reinforces how deeply people care about Scouting and how passionate they are about the organization. 
 
After careful consideration and extensive dialogue within the Scouting family, along with comments from those outside the organization, the volunteer officers of the Boy Scouts of America’s National Executive Board concluded that due to the complexity of this issue, the organization needs time for a more deliberate review of its membership policy.
 
To that end, the executive board of the National BSA directed its committees to further engage representatives of Scouting’s membership and listen to their perspectives and concerns.  This will assist the officers’ work on a resolution on membership standards.  The approximately 1,400 voting members of the national council will take action on the resolution at the national meeting in May 2013.    
 
America needs Scouting, and our policies must be based on what is in the best interest of our nation’s children.  We believe good people can disagree and still work together to accomplish great things for youth.
 
Going forward, I’m asking all of you in our Scouting family to work with us and to stay focused on that which unites us, reaching and serving young people to help them grow into good, strong citizens.
 
With your help, we can accomplish incredible things for the young people and the communities we serve.
 
Thank you,


Bill Haines
Scout Executive/CEO

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • A new Russian hypersonic missile could make the rest of the world's warships obsolete overnight. The International Business Times says it's called the Zircon missile, and experts say it's so fast, it would be unstoppable and could take out the most advanced aircraft carriers and warships with one strike. The Zircon uses scramjet technology to reach speeds of 4,600 miles per hour, 5 times faster than the speed of sound. It's being tested for deployment as soon as 2020. Right now, the only way for U.S. and British carriers to avoid it is to stay so far away, that the carrier's planes would be essentially useless.
  • Six schools were briefly placed on modified lockdown Thursday after a shooting in north Tulsa sent a man to the hospital with multiple gunshot wounds. Ofcr. Jeanne MacKenzie tells KRMG the victim’s girlfriend called 911 about 12:20 p.m. to report the shooting. One person, a female, is in custody and being questioned about the incident. A second potential suspect, a male, is still on the loose. Witnesses have told police he’s a white man, about six feet tall, possibly wearing a red baseball cap and driving a red car. The victim was reportedly in his mid-thirties; there has been no update yet on his condition. MacKenzie said it’s standard for TPS to lock down schools in an area where there has been a violent incident, and that there was never any immediate danger to the children. The affected schools were Bell, Hamilton, McKinley, Mitchell, Owen, and Tulsa MET.
  • One of the House Republican rebels, Kentucky Rep. Tom Massie, wasn't just 'no' on the GOP health care bill to replace Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Massie was 'hell no.' That won over Mary Broecker, president of the Oldham County Republican Women's Club and a strong proponent of a full-blown repeal of the 2010 law. 'When he came out against this bill, I thought, 'I trust him so this must be the right way,'' the 76-year-old retired teacher said of Massie this week as she sat at a coffee shop near her LaGrange home. Defying President Donald Trump on the seven-year Republican Party promise to repeal and replace 'Obamacare' sounds like political suicide, especially in the congressional districts Trump won handily. Yet in Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Iowa in the bitter aftermath of the GOP's epic failure, Republicans who blocked the legislation have won praise from constituents for stopping what many saw as a flawed plan, either in the legislation's substance or strategy. In the House, hard-line conservatives opposed the bill because it didn't go far enough in getting the government out of health care while moderates worried that tens of millions of Americans might be left without insurance. Trump's famed deal-making and power of persuasion faltered with his own party, a remarkable turn at a time when the GOP controls the White House, Senate and House. Nationwide, an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released Wednesday found that 62 percent disapprove of the way Trump is handling health care, his worst rating among seven issues the poll tested, including the economy, foreign policy and immigration.
  • President Donald Trump bested his predecessor, former President Barack Obama, in a national poll commissioned by The Salonniere asking respondents whom they would most like to sit next to at a dinner party. >> Read more trending news  The current commander in chief came out on top with 36 percent, followed by Obama at 24 percent. Former first lady Michelle Obama polled far ahead of her successor, first lady Melania Trump, though, 12 percent to 4 percent. Others named by respondents were Oprah Winfrey, at 7 percent, Lady Gaga at 6 percent and Lin-Manuel Miranda at 3 percent. Former first lady, Secretary of State and presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton tied with Melania Trump and Russian ruler Vladimir Putin at 4 percent. Reality television personality Kim Kardashian polled at 1 percent. The Salonniere’s Spring ’17 Party Poll, conducted in March by a national research firm, surveyed 1,203 men and women between 25 and 59 whose household income exceeds $75,000 annually. Respondents who get the chance to sit next to Trump at dinner might chastise him about what some consider a social faux pas: One-third of those polled disapproved of his decision to skip the April 29 White House Correspondents’ Association dinner.  Read more at The Salonniere.
  • For the fourth time in the past six days, President Donald Trump has used his platform on Twitter to take a swing at a group of more conservative Republicans in the House, this time raising the specter of using the bully pulpit against them in the 2018 elections, if they don’t get on board with his legislative agenda. “The Freedom Caucus will hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don’t get on the team, & fast,” Trump said on Twitter. “We must fight them, & Dems, in 2018!” he added. The Twitter jabs against the Freedom Caucus are becoming somewhat routine for Mr. Trump, who was frustrated that he was unable to convince those lawmakers to back a GOP health care bill last week. Even before today, those type of tweets by the President have drawn frowns from some members of the Freedom Caucus, who say they’re not budging on their conservative principles, just to give Mr. Trump a legislative victory. “I disagree with him,” Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL) said earlier this week, after Mr. Trump signaled his displeasure with the Freedom Caucus opposition to the GOP health bill. “My conscience was to get rid of Obamacare; this doesn’t do it,” Yoho said of the GOP plan that had the blessing of the White House. “Some of the constant tweeting is at minimum distracting, and at maximum, counterproductive to a legislative agenda,” said Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC), who also knocked the President for using Twitter to keep grousing as well about Hillary Clinton. “You’re fighting yesterday’s story if you are fighting against a candidate you were once running against that is no longer the candidate you might be running against,” Sanford said.