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Local
Creek Turnpike widening to include nine new noise abatement walls
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Creek Turnpike widening to include nine new noise abatement walls

Creek Turnpike widening to include nine new noise abatement walls
Photo Credit: Rick Couri
(Photo) 55 MPH sign on Creek Turnpike

Creek Turnpike widening to include nine new noise abatement walls

People living along the Creek Turnpike in south Tulsa say they've been bothered for years by noise from the busy highway, a problem which has grown along with the growing traffic that has led to the current expansion project.

KRMG spoke with Lori Walderich, whose family lives on the south side of the turnpike between S. Sheridan Road and S. Memorial Blvd.

She says the noise has been a major nuisance for her neighborhood.

"Several of our neighbors moved away," she said. "The one that lived next door to us forever moved away because of the noise."

She added that her family had taken to running a humidifier at night as a sound baffle so they could sleep and that she plays with the children in the front yard because the back yard is too noisy.

After reading KRMG's story about the Creek Turnpike expansion, Walderich contacted the Oklahoma Turnpike Authority to ask them about the noise.

To her great relief, she says they told her they would be building additional noise abatement walls.

KRMG confirmed that information with Jack Damrill of OTA.

He says the authority will build a total of nine new walls ranging in size from a few yards to a mile in length along the area encompassed by the lane expansion project.

"People in those areas should start seeing some of the ground work done soon," he told KRMG.

He added that because the walls are well away from the traffic lanes, they can be built fairly quickly and with minimal disruption to traffic on the turnpike.

The $57 million expansion project will widen the turnpike from four lanes to six between U.S. 75 and S. Memorial Blvd. and will take roughly 15 months to complete.

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