ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
44°
Clear
H 48° L 27°
  • clear-day
    44°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 48° L 27°
  • clear-night
    36°
    Evening
    Clear. H 48° L 27°
  • clear-night
    28°
    Morning
    Clear. H 58° L 39°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
Crashes and holiday traffic creates closures on area roads
Close

Crashes and holiday traffic creates closures on area roads

Crashes and holiday traffic creates closures on area roads

Crashes and holiday traffic creates closures on area roads

People are filing onto area roadways trying to get a jump on the long holiday weekend.

KRMG listeners are texting their frustrations to 95920 because of so much traffic.

Highway 51 westbound was completely shut down between Kenosha and Elm shortly after 3:00 Wednesday afternoon due to a crash.

An accident on Highway 169 southbound, between 21st and 31st, caused added headaches Wednesday morning.

There was also a big backup earlier on the Broken Arrow Expressway at the I-44 exit.

According to AAA, the number of people traveling out of town is down this year.

Part of that is attributed to the holiday weekend being one day shorter than 2012 when the holiday fell on a Wednesday.

Most people will travel by car, 84 percent, while another 8 percent will fly.

Travelers can avoid backups on the roads and at the airport by avoiding the two busiest days,
which are July 3rd and July 7th.

This year’s trip will cost more than in 2012.

Median spending is expected to be $747.

You might notice an uptick in your hotel bill too over last year.

AAA reports a 4 percent increase in rates over the 2012 holiday at hotels that meet its 3-diamond level.

You'll also see a much bigger increase if you're renting a car.

Rates will average $58 a day, up 29 percent from last year.

Gas prices have dipped recently, but are still slightly higher than they were last year nationwide.

 

From the Oklahoma Department of Transportation:

The following construction projects will impact travel on major highways through Sunday, July 7 for the July Fourth holiday. For turnpike information call the Turnpike Authority at 405-425-3600 or pikepass.com.

 

SH-74 work zone near Crescent, Logan Co.
Be alert to reduced speeds on SH-74 near Crescent.

US-64 closed near US-77 in Perry, Noble Co.
US-64 is closed near the US-77 junction in Perry; follow detour signs through downtown.

US-177 narrows near SH-33, Payne Co.
US-177 is narrowed from near the SH-33 junction to the Payne/Lincoln Co. line.

SH-33 closed near SH-47, Custer Co.
SH-33 is closed between Custer City and SH-47; use US-183 and SH-47 as a detour.

US-60/US-59 interchange narrowed near Afton, Ottawa Co.
US-60 and US-59 are narrowed to one lane at the interchange north of Afton.

US-169/US-60 narrow in Nowata, Nowata Co.
US-169 and US-60 are narrowed at the junction in Nowata during daylight hours daily.

SH-56 narrowed near Okmulgee, Okmulgee Co.
SH-56 is narrowed to one lane west of Okmulgee at Deep Fork Creek; temporary signals are in place.

US-77 narrows near Marietta, Love. Co.
US-77 narrows to one lane south of Marietta during daylight hours on Friday; use I-35 between Thackerville and Marietta.

SH-48 narrows near SH-31 junction, Coal Co.
SH-48 is narrowed near the SH-31 junction; be alert to temporary signals and flagging operations.

US-70 narrows near US-259, McCurtain Co.
US-70 is narrowed approximately nine miles north of the US-259 junction near Broken Bow.

SH-3 narrows near Atoka, Atoka Co.
SH-3 is narrowed approximately three miles east of Atoka.

US-69 narrowed near SH-113 junction, Pittsburg Co.
US-69 is narrowed near the SH-113 junction north of McAlester.

Oklahoma City Metro

Use caution - I-35 Moore and SH-66 El Reno
While all lanes are open on I-35 in Moore and SH-66 in El Reno, be alert and do not cause unnecessary congestion in these areas as tornado relief work continues.

I-35 narrowed south of Norman
I-35 is narrowed to two lanes at the South Canadian River bridge, south of SH-9 East in Norman; expect congestion and use US-77 as an alternate route.

 


All I-35 ramps at Main St. in Norman closed
All ramps at the I-35/Main St. interchange in Norman are closed; exit I-35 at Robinson St. when coming from the north or at Lindsey St. from the south or avoid the area if possible.

 


Southbound I-235 ramp to N.W. 50th St. closed
The southbound I-235 ramp to N.W. 50th St. is permanently closed. Drivers on southbound I-235 wanting to access N.W. 50th St. are advised to exit I-235 at N.W. 36th St. or eastbound I-44 at Western Ave. to bypass the closure.

I-40 narrows near Yukon nightly
I-40 narrows between Morgan Rd. and Garth Brooks Blvd. nightly from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. nightly through Friday and from 8 p.m. to noon on weekends.

I-40 narrowed in western Oklahoma County
I-40 is narrowed at the N. Canadian River, between Council Rd. and Morgan Road.


Tulsa Metro

US-169, US-64/SH-51 (Broken Arrow Expressway) – lanes narrow, ramps close daily
The following closures are scheduled from 7 p.m. Friday to 5 a.m. Monday; expect significant delays in these corridors and locate an alternate route if possible.
·        Various lane closures on north and southbound US-169 at the US-64/SH-51 junction.
·        The two left lanes of east and westbound US-64/SH-51 at the US-169 junction.
·        The westbound US-64/SH-51 off-ramp to southbound US-169.

I-244/Arkansas River bridge - lane and ramp closures
Expect delays and plan ahead for extra travel time on the Inner Dispersal Loop.
Closures include:
·        Westbound I-244 is narrowed to two lanes between 2nd St. to near 21st St. South.
·        The southbound US-75/westbound US-64/SH-51 off-ramp to westbound I-244/southbound US-75 (south leg IDL to Arkansas River) is closed; detour to the east/north and west legs of the IDL to access westbound I-244/southbound US-75.
·        The southbound US-75/westbound US-64/SH-51 on-ramp from Denver Ave. is closed.
·        The westbound I-244 off-ramp to eastbound US-64/SH-51 (west leg to south leg IDL) is closed; detour to the north and east legs of the IDL to access eastbound US-64/SH-51.

I-44/Lewis Ave. widening project
All lanes of Lewis Ave. are closed at the I-44 junction; be alert to reduced speeds in this corridor.

I-244 ramps closed at Memorial Dr.
All ramps at the I-244/Memorial Dr. interchange are closed; use Sheridan Rd. or Mingo Rd. as a detour.

US-75/116th St. North overpass project
All lanes of 116th St. North are closed at the US-75 junction. Be alert to reduced speeds in this corridor.


I-244 narrows near US-75 junction (western split) daily
The left lane of eastbound I-244 will be closed between the US-75 junction and the I-44 junction (western split) from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays for cable barrier installation.

US-75 narrows at 131st St. South daily
Drivers can expect various lane closures on north and southbound US-75 between 131st St. South and 81st St. South from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays for cable barrier installation.


Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Two police officers were shot Thursday morning in Harrisburg, . >> Read more trending newsThe shooting happened about 6:30 a.m. on Mulberry Street, which is located in the area of a residential neighborhood.
  • The political finger pointing over government spending dramatically accelerated Thursday in Washington, a day before funding runs out for the federal government, as top Republicans joined with President Trump in an effort to blame Democrats for any government shutdown, accusing Democrats of trying to use talks over extra money for the military to win unrelated provisions on immigration. In swift succession over a half hour period, the President, the Speaker of the House, and the Senate Majority Leader were all on television, pointing the finger straight at Democrats in the Senate. “If the Senate Democrats want to shut the government down,” Speaker Paul Ryan said at a news conference, “then that would be their choice to make.” Meanwhile, the President ventured across the Potomac River to the Pentagon, where he said a shutdown would not only harm the military, but Mr. Trump said it was also an effort by Democrats to take away economic momentum from recent tax cuts. “Democrats would like to blunt that by shutting down government,” the President said, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and Defense Secretary James Mattis. At the same time on the Senate floor, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was criticizing Democrats for trying to force Republicans to accept provisions dealing with immigration and the DACA program. “Why would they filibuster government funding and shut down vital programs for Americans because we have not yet agreed on the best way to settle an unrelated issue?” McConnell said, making clear he was ready to take a hard line with the other party. But even as Republicans showed a united front against Democrats on the shutdown, there were questions in GOP ranks about whether the House could pass a temporary funding measure, as a number of House Republicans said they were still ready to vote against that funding bill, not pleased with lack of action on spending by the Congress. OH GOP Rep Davidson, member of Freedom Caucus, said yesterday he was undecided on CR. Today he told me he's voting NO Asked about speaker predicting it would pass, he admitted speaker knows whip count better than he does — Deirdre Walsh (@deirdrewalshcnn) January 18, 2018 As for Democrats, they laughed at the idea that they were responsible for a possible shutdown, arguing that Republicans have the majority in the House and Senate, and control the White House as well. “It’s a mess,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, who said the funding debacle was the result of the “incompetence of Republicans.” Democratic votes would be needed for any budget extension, as 60 votes are required to get around any filibuster. If no deal is worked out by Friday night at midnight, then some government services would start to close. The last federal government shutdown was in October 2013. That lasted 16 days.
  • Police in say officers have found Washington State University quarterback Tyler Hilinkski dead Tuesday in an apartment with an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.  >> Read more trending news At about 4:30 p.m., officers responded to an apartment to check on the welfare of a football player who did not show up for practice earlier in the day.  When officers arrived, they found Hilinkski, 21, deceased with an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.  Police said a rifle was recovered next to Hilinski and a note was found.  Washington State president Kirk Schulz tweeted, “Our thoughts and prayers are with the Hilinski family.” Former Washington State linebackers coach Roy Manning, who recently left for a position at UCLA, tweeted , “Words can’t describe what I’m feeling right now. My heart is beyond saddened. Please pray for the family and all of us affected!” Hilinski, from Claremont, Calif., recently finished his redshirt sophomore season for the Cougars. He started in place of Senior Luke Falk in the Cougars loss to Michigan State in the Holiday Bowl.  Hilinski played 11 games in his Cougars career, passing for 1,149 yards and seven touchdowns. Hilinski was the presumptive starting quarterback going into next season.  The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Making his first foray on to the campaign trail in 2018, President Donald Trump goes to southwestern Pennsylvania on Thursday to stump for a GOP candidate running for Congress, as Republicans have encountered some troubling signs in this mid-term election year, struggling with an election playing field that seems tilted against their party. In stops near Pittsburgh, Mr. Trump will help Pennsylvania state Rep. Rick Saccone, who is trying to win a March 13 special election for Congress, in a U.S. House district that voted for for the President by 19 points in November 2016.   The campaign trip comes two days after the latest evidence of a voting surge for Democrats, as they flipped a state legislative seat in Wisconsin, in a district that voted for President Trump by 17 points in 2016. “That sound you hear is a tsunami alert,” said election handicapper Stu Rothenberg, who like many in Washington, sees the possibility of a wave election in 2018 for the Democrats. The Wisconsin outcome was not ignored by the state’s Governor, Scott Walker, who is up for re-election this year. Senate District 10 special election win by a Democrat is a wake up call for Republicans in Wisconsin. — Scott Walker (@ScottWalker) January 17, 2018 In a fundraising email sent to supporters on Wednesday night, Governor Walker’s subject line was, “SHOCKING LOSS.” “Wisconsin conservatives just received a much-needed WAKE UP CALL,” the missive began. “Typically we’ve held this seat,” said House Speaker and Wisconsin native Paul Ryan to reporters. “Yeah, I think we should pay attention to it.” “We all have to work,” said Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH), who finds himself under great pressure as the head of the campaign arm of House Republicans. But the shift hasn’t just been in Wisconsin, as Democrats have seen their vote share increase across the board, in red states like Oklahoma and South Dakota, red districts in Georgia and South Carolina, and then in a big upset win in December in Alabama, where Doug Jones won a U.S. Senate seat. “These results continue the trend we saw in 2017,” said Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez. “Voters are flat-out rejecting the Trump-GOP agenda.” Whether that’s the case is not yet clear – but the numbers do show what Democrats have been able to do in race after race – get more of their own people out to vote, and attract more Independents as well. Here is a breakdown of Democrats' over performance tonight in all 4 contested special elections: SC #HD99: D+13.08% WI #AD58: D+24.90% WI #SD10: D+27.52% IA #HD06: D+20.44% That is an average Dem over performance tonight of D+21.49% That's… significant. — Aaron Booth (@ActorAaronBooth) January 17, 2018 In 2017, while Republicans were able to win a series of special elections for the U.S. House, the margins were much closer than normal – and that has campaign experts wondering if Democrats can maintain that momentum into November of 2018. “I don’t think people have fully priced in how much *worse* things could get for House Republicans in the next 300 days,” tweeted Dave Wasserman, an expert on House elections for the Cook Political Report. So far in 2018, all of the news about retiring lawmakers in Congress has come from the GOP side, as 31 House Republicans won’t be back next January, compared to 14 Democrats. That turnover – before even one vote has been cast in a Congressional primary – is higher than normal, and even higher than the number of Democrats who left in 1994 – when the GOP had a huge mid-term victory, and took control of both houses of Congress. All of that is getting noticed by those who have been in politics, like ex-Rep. Joe Walsh (R-IL), who now does talk radio. There is a blue Democrat tsunami wave coming in 2018 like we've never seen. Our side better wake up. https://t.co/ejVkigQlMW — Joe Walsh (@WalshFreedom) January 17, 2018 The game plan for the GOP in 2018 is straightforward at this point – President Trump and Republican lawmakers are doing all they can to highlight the tax cuts enacted into law late last year, and how that’s going to help working Americans right away. On Thursday, Mr. Trump will stop at H&K Equipment near Pittsburgh, a company that White House officials say is going to benefit from the new tax plan. “2017 was the best year in company history, which they credit to the President’s pro-jobs, pro-worker, pro-growth economic agenda,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. “Thanks to the passage of the Trump tax cuts, H&K will now be able to expense 100 percent of the investments they make in new equipment in the same year they buy it,” Sanders added. On Capitol Hill, it’s also a daily drumbeat for GOP lawmakers, as they tout the tax cuts at every opportunity – like this speech on the Seante floor from Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA). While the polls have shown weak numbers for Congressional Republicans in recent months, some of the new data indicates an uptick in public support for the tax cuts, and GOP lawmakers believe that can only help as more people see more money in their paychecks. “Had the other side gotten in, the market would have gone down fifty percent,” the President told an audience at the White House on Tuesday, as he is ready to make the case repeatedly this year that his election over Hillary Clinton was key to more economic growth and jobs. “You know what we’ve done in our tax bill, and you know how successful it’s been,” Mr. Trump added. He’ll make that case again Thursday in Pennsylvania, as Republicans try to make sure 2018 isn’t remembered for an election tide that swept them out of the Congress.  
  • More than a half dozen school districts in Oklahoma have closed for at least a day because of the flu outbreak. The Morris, Quinton, Swink, Hugo and Valliant districts are closed until next week. Cleveland and Union City schools both closed for a day earlier this week. The Oklahoma State Department of Health reports at least 22 flu-related deaths this flu season.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control reports widespread flu in 49 states.