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Child molester had access to kids in a number of ways, despite previous conviction
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Child molester had access to kids in a number of ways, despite previous conviction

Child molester had access to kids in a number of ways, despite previous conviction
Photo Credit: Russell Mills

Child molester had access to kids in a number of ways, despite previous conviction

In an age when almost limitless information is available at one's fingertips, how does a convicted child molester end up associating with children at a number of civic, church, and even government-operated groups and facilities?

The case of Tulsan Michael Jon Bauhaus, 55, raises that question in the minds of parents, relatives of victims, and child protection advocates.

With two prior convictions of lewd molestation, Bauhaus still managed to gain access to children in any number of ways, prosecutors say.

Worse, he even made statements to other adults that should have raised suspicions.

"He made several statements to many different people about how he shouldn't be left alone with kids, and how he'd had a 'troubled past,' and how he'd been accused of things in the past," Asst. D.A. Sarah McAmis told KRMG.

McAmis heads up the Crimes Against Children division in the Tulsa County D.A.'s office.

She wrote an extensive brief that details Bauhaus' criminal career.

We have posted it HERE, but be forewarned some of the content is explicit, and disturbing.

In it, McAmis writes that Bauhaus admitted to deliberately getting involved with any number of organizations in order to gain access to young  boys.

Among them, the Royal Rangers Christian youth group,  Children’s Medical Center on the Children’s Psychiatric Ward, the Tulsa Boys Home, a Methodist Church, the Lloyd E. Rader Center, and the Boy Scouts of America.

He also attempted to join Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, and even filed to become a foster parent to one of his victims.

The urgent question in the minds of many who review this case: How could he go undetected for some ten years while continuing to be around any number of children at Rennaissance fairs, libraries, and other events?

Bauhaus rehabilitated hawks and falcons, and went to events to show them.

That's where he met his last victim, whose mother tells KRMG in an exclusive interview that he molested her son with at least six other people present.

"That's how sneaky he was," she said.

She admits he talked about having a problem being around children, but says the parents thought he meant he didn't like being around them.

She says his parole officer should have been aware of his continued contact with children.

But McAmis says people tend to want to see the "good" in others, and want to believe they could tell if someone's evil.

But that's simply not the case.

"Don't ever worry about a situation where you're going to hurt somebody's feelings," McAmis told KRMG. "Err on the side of the child, and if something seems out of place to you, or if someone gives you information that should be a red flag, then just take the time to check into it."

KRMG did so, in a staff meeting Thursday morning, using a iPhone. It took less than 30 seconds to look up Bauhaus' name on a list of registered sex offenders.

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