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Brand new body part discovered
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Brand new body part discovered

Brand new body part discovered
New body part

Brand new body part discovered

The new piece of the puzzle that is you exists in your knee. It’s called the anterolateral ligament and it does some major work in the joint.

The ligament is housed near the front and side of the knee where it connects the femur and anterolateral tibia.

All the way back in 1879 a Frenchman named Paul Segond postulated on the possible existence of the ligament referring to it as a "pearly, resistant, fibrous band."

Medical Daily reports two Belgium doctors, Steven Claes and Johan Bellemans confirmed the existence by dissecting the knees of 41 cadavers.

They found the band of fibers in 97%, of them.

Doctors believe the discovery will help explain why some ACL injuries are harder to fix. If the new ligament isn’t working correctly the knee will feel like it “pivots.”

The surgeons theorize if they fix the anterolateral ligament, they can more quickly stabilize the knee.

Science Daily has more on how this seemingly easy to see body part was never before discovered.

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