ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
77°
Sunny
H 85° L 61°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    77°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 85° L 61°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    82°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 85° L 61°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    65°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 88° L 64°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
Big 12 commissioner calls coaches salaries 'outlandish'
Close

Big 12 commissioner calls coaches salaries 'outlandish'

Big 12 commissioner calls coaches salaries 'outlandish'
Photo Credit: Big 12
(Photo) Bob Bowlsby, Big 12 commissioner

Big 12 commissioner calls coaches salaries 'outlandish'

Bob Bowlsby has spent the last nine months since being named the fourth commissioner of the Big 12 Conference listening to others. He hears the good and sometimes the opposite in his job, and the first-year commissioner took the opportunity on Wednesday to share his thoughts on the current state of major college athletics.

Bowlsby was the featured speaker in the Executive Management Briefings, coordinated by the Center for Executive and Professional Development at Oklahoma State University’s Spears School of Business. He also is scheduled to be the featured speaker at the Tulsa Business Forums on Thursday at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. 

The Big 12 commissioner spoke to the crowd at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City about some of the issues that are often associated with college athletics. He listed three of the most prevalent issues involving college athletics:

1)  Coaches are being paid outlandish salaries;

2)  Presidents need to get control or higher education will continue in an irreversible decline;

3)  Athletes are no longer real students. We need to engage ourselves in restoring academic integrity in intercollegiate athletics.

Bowlsby addressed the matter of football and basketball coaches earning multi-million dollar salaries. “It’s true, they are (paid outlandish salaries). They make one heck of a lot of money. Some of them are earning it, some of them are not. Some assistant coaches are making a lot more than they are worth. Commissioners are being paid more than they are worth. Some CEOs are worth what they are being paid. They are driving shareholder profits, they’re driving companies forward, they’re doing all the right things and they’re doing them in the right way. Others are not. That’s just the way it is, and my business isn’t any different than any of yours.”

Bowlsby told the Tulsa World that the league studied expasion closely and believes the current conference of ten is right fit.  He added the league will remain ready to act if they think other teams are needed.

As for the issue of university President’s needing to get control of college athletics, Bowlsby says that the current hierarchy of 18 NCAA Board of Directors was implemented in 1996. “It was supposed to bring great integrity to the process. I’ll leave it to you to determine whether or not we have advanced the integrity or gone in another direction,” he said. 

“I would suggest to you that we haven’t made progress, and one of the reasons we haven’t is because the Board of Directors of the NCAA doesn’t have the necessary practitioners in the room when they’re making decisions. It’s a point of advocacy that I have made and am going to continue to make,” Bowlsby said. 

Bowlsby disagrees with the assertion that the young men and women who represent Oklahoma State, Texas Tech, Kansas and the other seven Big 12 institutions are no longer students looking to earn a college degree.

“Well, in actuality the graduation rates of student-athletes are the best they’ve been in the history of intercollegiate athletics. That’s particularly true of African-American males where the outrage was the greatest that ... student-athletes were reaching the end of their playing careers without having any opportunity to earn meaningful degrees,” said Bowlsby.

“Graduation rates in football and men’s basketball are both over 70 percent at the present time. They’ve both gone up 10 percent in the last six years. So we’re making progress and those assertions about taking classes that don’t mean anything, majoring in ‘eligibility,’ doing things that represent well on the field but don’t represent well in the classroom just plain aren’t true.”

Bowlsby then stunned the audience when he shared that each of the three concerns were taken from an 1927 article in The New York Times.

“This came up in the ’40s, it came up in the ’50s, it came up in the ’70s ... these things have been around for eons. Our lot in life in college athletics is to be in a small boat in choppy seas. That’s just the way it is. It was that way when I was an athletic director, (and) it’s that way now that I’m a commissioner,” said Bowlsby, who spent 28 years as an athletic director at Stanford, Iowa and Northern Iowa before being named last May as the Big 12 commissioner.

But Bowlsby is optimistic that the Big 12‘s boat is heading in the right direction. 

“I’m very excited about our league and I’m very excited about the future,” he said.

“I’m committed to the improvement for our student-athletes. I think athletics done properly is a great thing for higher education. It’s a well-traveled bridge between the campus and the community, and it makes all the sense in the world if it’s done properly, if it has the right balance, if it has the right components and it has the right relationships.

“I’m excited about the future. I don’t have many years left in the business, and part of the reason I came to the Big 12 and came to the commissioner’s role after all these years on campus (as an athletic director) is that I want to help make a difference in what intercollegiate athletics looks like going forward.” 

The third and final speaker in the Spears School’s speaker series will be Tom Brokaw, the television journalist and author who is best known for being anchor of NBC Nightly News from 1982 to 2004 and author of the book “The Greatest Generation.” He will speak on April 2, from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Mabee Center in Tulsa and from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Civic Center in Oklahoma City.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Responding to concerns about personal security for lawmakers after last week’s gun attack at a Congressional baseball practice, U.S. House leaders are moving to provide extra money to members for protection back home, as well as new funding to bolster the work of police and security officials on Capitol Hill. Under a plan approved by a House spending subcommittee on Friday, the Congress would provide an extra $7.5 million next year to the Capitol Police for an “increased security posture” around the Capitol, along with $5 million to the House Sergeant at Arms to help with security for lawmakers back in their districts. “We are taking a new fresh look at security,” said Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS), the Chairman of subcommittee that deals with funding for the Legislative Branch. Our FY18 Legislative Branch funding bill increases efficiency & transparency in Congress, enhances security for Members & our constituents. pic.twitter.com/FI36tF2XeH — Rep. Kevin Yoder (@RepKevinYoder) June 22, 2017 “The tragic events of June 14 weigh heavily on these deliberations,” said Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, which could vote on the extra money as early as this next week. Also being put into motion is a separate plan to funnel an extra $25,000 to each member of the House – about $11 million in all – to help them increase security back in their districts. “The scariest part for us is there used to be this impression by the public that we all had security everywhere we went,” said Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH). “Now, everyone knows that isn’t the case,” Ryan added, as he lent his support to the extra funding for security as well. The money in this budget bill would not take effect until the new fiscal year – which starts October 1 – so, House leaders are ready to okay extra money immediately for members worried about security back in their districts. Roll Call newspaper reported that could be approved in coming days by the House Administration Committee. Yoder said Congressional leaders are also waiting to see if money raised in campaign contributions for House elections could be put to use for security as well. “Pending an FEC (Federal Election Commission) decision, we’re also looking at whether campaign funds could be used to continue to support security upgrades at personal residences,” Yoder added.
  • An unknown aged girl went to the hospital with burns to her legs, following an overnight house fire. KRMG’s told the fire started around 2:40 a.m., at a residence on West 50th Court North. The homeowner says he was able to get his daughter, grand daughter and sleeping brother out of the house. So far, firefighters haven't released a cause for the fire.  The homeowner believes fumes from a gas can in the garage may have cause the blaze.   
  • Multiple people had to be rescued early Saturday morning in Rogers County. OTEMS paramedics report a boat started to sink on Oologah Lake just after midnight. “Additional information was received that the boat had its nose in the air, four individuals were in the water, and only one was wearing a PDF (personal flotation device),” an official said. “A Rogers County Deputy spotted what might be the boat south of Winganon Bridge but was unable to determine the precise location. However it was located by the Northwest Water Rescue unit and at 0048 hours the rescue boat reported that it had located the victims and was loading the fourth individual into the boat.” KRMG’s told the victims were hanging onto the hull when they were found. So far, no injuries have been reported.  Officials also haven’t released any names.   We do know the Oklahoma Highway Patrol has taken over the investigation.  
  • Tulsa investigators are looking for a driver who fled the scene, after hitting a male pedestrian late Friday night. Police report the auto-pedestrian collision happened around 11:34 p.m., near East Admiral and North Yale. “The pedestrian victim has been declared deceased at this time,” police said.   Investigators don't have a description of the driver or the car.  Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.
  • We know this might start an argument, but according to Business Insider, Oklahoma's most famous band EVER is the Flaming Lips. Business Insider admits the song 'She Don't Use Jelly' is the Norman-based indie rockers only U.S. hit. But they say the band has had many hits in the U.K. and Europe and, even more impressive, three Grammys to their credit. Some on the list are hard to argue with, like Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band in New Jersey or Nirvana in Washington State. You can see the entire list of the most famous bands here.