ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
77°
Sunny
H 91° L 68°
  • clear-night
    77°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 91° L 68°
  • clear-day
    88°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 91° L 68°
  • clear-day
    86°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 92° L 68°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
American Airlines issues layoff warnings to thousands of workers
Close

American Airlines issues layoff warnings to thousands of workers

American Airlines issues layoff warnings to thousands of workers
Photo Credit: Russell Mills
American Airlines maintenance facility, east Tulsa

American Airlines issues layoff warnings to thousands of workers

Nearly 3000 union workers at American Airlines in Tulsa are learning they soon may find themselves in the unemployment line. 

The airline has informed Transport Workers Union Local 514 that 2,994 workers at the Tulsa maintenance base may lose their jobs as the company restructures under bankruptcy. 

A WARN notice to the union indicates the lay-offs may come as early as November 16th, with another round slated for December 16.

WARN stands for Worker Adjustment and Retraining Act. 

In the WARN notice the airline said: “We continually review every aspect of our business to ensure we remain competitive and are able to sustain our long-term business objectives. As part of our restructuring, each workgroup was obligated to reduce costs necessary for the successful reorganization of American Airlines. Regrettably, reducing our costs requires that we must make a number of tough decisions. Several of these very difficult decisions involved modifying work rules so as to allow American Airlines to outsource certain work across the American Airlines system, which will result in a reduction in force.”

Last week American Airlines won bankruptcy court approval for new cost-cutting labor agreements with unions for mechanics and flight attendants. 

American is trying to reduce its’ labor costs by more than $1 billion.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • With Friday’s decision by Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) to oppose a last-ditch GOP proposal to overhaul the Obama health law, Republicans have almost run out of time to make substantive changes to Obamacare by a September 30 deadline for action under a special expedited procedure that did not allow for a Senate filibuster, again dealing the President and GOP leaders a bitter defeat on an issue they’ve campaigned on for the last seven years. Here’s what can still happen over the next week – and in coming months on Capitol Hill. 1. There could still be a vote on Graham-Cassidy. While Sen. McCain has made clear that he won’t vote for the plan from Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), it’s possible that the Senate could still go on the record on the matter. Aides to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said earlier this week that he planned to force a vote, and that could still happen, to clearly show who was for the plan, and who was not. But for now, it seems like the GOP will fail to get anything done on this signature campaign issue, with McCain, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) definitely against the plan – and two others, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) leaning against. I cannot in good conscience vote for Graham-Cassidy. A bill impacting so many lives deserves a bipartisan approach. https://t.co/2sDjhw6Era pic.twitter.com/30OWezQpLg — John McCain (@SenJohnMcCain) September 22, 2017 2. It could re-start bipartisan health talks. Up until last week, when GOP interest suddenly surged in the Graham-Cassidy plan, there had been increasing efforts to find some kind of agreement between Senators in both parties on ways to make some short term improvements in the Obama health care system for those in the individual and non-group insurance market. Those efforts were put on the shelf in recent days, but now this development leaves an opening for Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA). I'm proud of you, John. It's time for the resumption of the bipartisan Alexander/Murray plan, and I'm ready to help however I can. https://t.co/xu2e3higf3 — John Kasich (@JohnKasich) September 22, 2017 3. GOP health care efforts are certainly not dead. Just because the Graham-Cassidy plan has seemingly fallen short, that doesn’t mean Republicans will give up on their plans to change the Obama health law. For the next fiscal year, the GOP wants to use the budget reconciliation process to pass something on tax cuts and tax reform. Well – there is no reason that they can’t also try to add a health care bill onto that measure as well. One Senate official told me exactly that a few weeks ago. So, this battle is not over. But waiting to do health care on next budget reconciliation bill would give CBO time to fully analyze #GrahamCassidy's impact — Manu Raju (@mkraju) September 22, 2017 4. Republicans just weren’t ready for this process. Maybe the biggest lesson from the after-action report on GOP health care bills over the last nine months is a simple one – Republicans were not ready with their own plan to replace the Obama health law, even though they had been talking about this for seven straight years. Ever since the law was signed by President Obama, Republicans had promised to repeal it, and do something different. As a slogan it sounded great – but as we saw in recent weeks, getting the exact details was something different. The GOP has had 7+ years to come up with a healthcare bill. They've also had a full majority for 8 months. And still nothing. Embarrassing! — Mitch Drabenstott (@mitchdwx) September 22, 2017 5. Democrats have also had 7 years to make improvements. Just as the GOP failed in rallying around a single plan, Democrats also didn’t exactly ring the bell in recent years on how best to improve the Obamacare system. Yes, they admit, things aren’t working perfectly, but they certainly haven’t been talking about what exactly should change, or might be changed. Could we see something different now that Graham-Cassidy seems to be dead? Or will Democrats still just sort of circle the wagons to protect President Obama’s top legislative accomplishment? This is the time for bipartisan action – but that’s easier said than done. McCain's advice for Congress: Republicans and Democrats must work together to improve health care. — Cary Weldy (@caryweldy) September 22, 2017
  • Former Heisman Trophy winner Ricky Williams was arrested in Texas on Tuesday on traffic warrants, records show. >> Read more trending news  Williams was pulled over for a traffic offense, then arrested on warrants, Austin police said. He is no longer in the Travis County Jail, records show.  Williams, who starred at the University of Texas and played seven seasons in the NFL, is currently a football analyst for ESPN's Longhorn Network. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1998 and was the second Longhorn to win college football’s top prize, and was also a two-time All-American. Earlier this year, Williams said he was racially profiled while walking through a neighborhood in Tyler. A man called 911 when he 'observed a black male, wearing all black, crouched down behind his wire fence,' and Tyler police stopped and searched Williams, according to media reports.  Williams was taken to the Travis County Jail 17 years ago, when he was playing for the New Orleans Saints, when he refused to sign a traffic ticket, according to previous media reports. 
  • A former Michigan health official testified Thursday that he started asking questions about bacteria in Flint’s water supply a year before the state publicly acknowledged an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease. Tim Becker, who was deputy director at the Department of Health and Human Services, acknowledged that the agency could have issued a public warning in January 2015. But it was 12 more months before the department and Gov. Rick Snyder said something publicly. Becker was the first witness at a key court hearing involving his former boss, department director Nick Lyon, who is charged with involuntary manslaughter in the death of an 85-year-old man and misconduct in office. A judge must decide whether there’s enough evidence to send him to trial. Lyon’s attorneys call the charges “baseless.” The attorney general’s office says a timely announcement about a Legionnaires’ outbreak in the Flint area in 2014-15 might have saved Robert Skidmore. He died of congestive heart failure, six months after he was treated for Legionnaires’.
  • Another day, another Facebook Hoax.  This time you may have seen people warning you on your Facebook feed that there’s a secret list of people following your posts. They’re supposedly not your friends, but complete strangers.  The posts then direct you to search “Following Me” in your Facebook account and there will be a list of names you won’t recognize, The Times Union reported. >> Read more trending news  The problem is, it is all a hoax that your Facebook friends are unknowingly perpetuating. This isn’t the first time a following hoax took root on social media. Snopes investigated a similar claim in January that people from “Facebook security” were paid to watch people on the platform.  Both are untrue, according to Snopes. So how can you find out how who really is following you? According to Facebook’s Help Center, you go to the right corner and select settings, then click public posts, then select friends or public next to who can follow me. 
  • The word “dotard” is not new, although it hasn’t been used lately in polite (or even impolite) conversation. Kim Jong-Un unearthed it during a speech he made Friday; translators used the word “dotard” in describing President Donald Trump. >> Read more trending news Dictionary.com defines “dotard” as, “a person, especially an old person, exhibiting a decline in mental faculties; a weak-minded or foolish old person.” Merriam-Webster cites the first known use of the word in the 14th century and notes it’s in the “bottom 30 percent of words” on its website. It defines dotard as “a person in his or her dotage.” >> Twitter abuzz after Kim calls Trump a “dotard” “Dotage” is defined by Merriam-Webster as “a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness.” According to the Ngram tool on Google, the word “dotard” peaked in 1823. William Shakespeare was a fan of the word. In “Much Ado About Nothing,” Leonato defends himself against Claudio and tells the soldier: “Tush, tush, man, never fleer and jest at me. I speak not like a dotard nor a fool.” In “Taming of the Shrew,” Baptista commands that Vincentio be imprisoned, saying 'Away with the dotard; to jail with him.”The “Irish Monthly Magazine of Politics and Literature” from 1833 carries this sentence: “A father’s stern command resigned her to the arms of a dotard. …”The “Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction” from 1842 contains this sentence: “This old favourite, and ‘father of cheap literature,’ though advanced in years, is not cast off as a thing lacking in interest; a dotard in its second childhood; but, on the contrary, is now looked upon as a hoary-headed sage, abounding in humour. …”Dotard appears to be making a comeback, thanks to Kim.