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    While some of the plans proposed in President Donald Trump’s $4.1 trillion budget for 2018 seem unlikely to be approved by the Congress, the document sets out a unique road map of how the Trump Administration views a variety of functions within the federal government, and what items the White House would like to get rid of – big and small. Here are eight things you might have missed in the fine print of the 2018 Trump budget: 1. An effort to close down excess military bases. The Trump budget includes a provision to start a round of military base closures in 2021, an idea that is sure to draw strong opposition, despite clear evidence that the military has too much overhead and infrastructure. Lawmakers have routinely rejected such efforts in recent years, with some still simmering about the impact of past base closure rounds – especially the last one in 2005. “The Department of Defense (DOD) has approximately 20 percent excess infrastructure capacity across all Military Departments,” the budget argues. While it may make sense to some, the odds are probably stacked against this provision in the Congress. File this under 'things that will go nowhere.' Trump's Pentagon budget proposes a BRAC, @LeoShane writes. https://t.co/xnvAv755VV — Valerie Insinna (@ValerieInsinna) May 23, 2017 2. End funding for public broadcasting. For a number of years, Republicans have pushed to reduce the amount of money that the feds put into public broadcasting, and President Trump’s plan would do away with almost all the $484 million being spent this year on such activities, leaving $30 million to wind down operations. The White House argues that PBS and NPR ” could make up the shortfall by increasing revenues from corporate sponsors, foundations, and members.” As with the effort to close down military bases, the odds would seem to be against this – but Congress will have the final say. As expected, Trump's budget calls for zeroing out funding for public broadcasting, arts and humanities. https://t.co/79EO9ZOeJM — Ted Johnson (@tedstew) May 23, 2017 3. When is a Medicaid cut not a Medicaid cut? I have always tried to be very careful about using the term “cut” – because too often, there are not budget cuts, but just reductions in the level of increase in a program. Let’s look at Medicaid in the President’s 2018 budget as an example: If you look at this graphic, you will see how the President’s budget would save $610 billion by reforming Medicaid. The second set of figures is the “baseline” for Medicaid – where spending would go without any changes. That says $408 billion would be spent on Medicaid in 2018, ending up at $688 billion in 2027. The bottom graphic is the Trump proposal, which has Medicaid at $404 billion in 2018 and $524 billion in 2027. “There’s not cuts at all,” said Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS). “It’s a matter of slowing the growth rate.” Yes, the Trump plan would spend less money than current built-in automatic growth rate, but the overall amount still goes up over the ten year budget. 4. But those are real cuts at CDC and NIH. One of the areas with some of the strongest bipartisan support is on medical research at the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. And so, when the numbers came in on Tuesday, there was a bipartisan negative reaction on cuts to NIH and CDC. NIH funding would be reduced by from $31.8 billion to $25.9 billion. CDC’s budget would go down $1.2 billion, a 17 percent cut. It’s a pretty good bet that lawmakers will not approve those cuts suggested by the President. The former head of the CDC expressed his displeasure: Proposed CDC budget: unsafe at any level of enactment. Would increase illness, death, risks to Americans, and health care costs. — Dr. Tom Frieden (@DrFrieden) May 23, 2017 5. Still few details on funding infrastructure plan. For months, the President and his top aides have talked about a $1 trillion infrastructure plan to build new roads and bridges in the United States. There was a fact sheet released by the White House, setting out some ideas, like rolling back regulations on how infrastructure projects are developed, but no new pot of money to fund $200 billion in seed money. “Providing more federal funding, on its own, is not the solution to our infrastructure challenges,” the White House noted. One of the few ideas offered was to allow states to levy tolls on interstate highways, and allow private companies to run rest areas. The Trump plan reduces spending from the highway trust fund by $95 billion over ten years. 6. Farm country not pleased with Trump budget details. If you had an infrared heat detector just off the Senate floor today, you might have seen the steam coming from the ears of Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), the Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee. Speaking with reporters, Roberts – well known for his dry wit – suggested the White House needs to make its budget writers count to 60 multiple times every day – to remind them that 60 votes would be needed for major farm policy spending changes. The Trump plan would save $38 billion over 10 years by limiting crop insurance subsidies and eligibility, streamlining conservation programs and more. Outside groups quickly made their voices heard on the proposed changes as well. It is hard to imagine these plans becoming law. The time and place to debate farm bill programs is during the #farmbill, not the annual budget. #Budget2018 — NCGA Public Policy (@NCGA_DC) May 23, 2017 7. Legal Services Corporation again on the chopping block. One of the first debates that I distinctly remember from my first summer on Capitol Hill in 1980 was an effort to cut money from the non-profit Legal Services Corporation, which provides legal aid to low income Americans. The LSC budget is $384 million for this year, and under the Trump plan, would be cut down to around $30 million, to allow for operations to be terminated. Again, this is another budget cut that seems unlikely to be approved, as GOP lawmakers, like Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), are already saying they oppose such a plan. I support funding of @LSCtweets. #READ why it's important via @daytondailynews: https://t.co/VZL37GU0CL — US Rep. Mike Turner (@RepMikeTurner) May 20, 2017 8. Trump wants to sell D.C. drinking water authority. Created by Congress in 1859, the Washington Aqueduct brings drinking water to Washington, D.C., and parts of the Virginia suburbs. While the drinking facilities operate under the auspices of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the water customers pay for all the operation and maintenance costs, as well as any improvements. Why does the White House want to sell this? “Ownership of local water supply is best carried out by State or local government or the private sector where there are appropriate market and regulatory incentives,” the budget documents state. It’s not clear how the feds estimated that selling the authority would bring in $119 million for Uncle Sam. Very proud to be your public servants! pic.twitter.com/BEOQXuYhmu — Washington Aqueduct (@WAqueduct) May 8, 2017 If you want to read more of the details about the Trump 2018 budget, you can find those on the White House website.
  • How much are the biggest tech companies worth? Try looking at the entire Chicago skyline. Just for comparison's sake, MarketWatch says Bank of America/Merrill Lynch looked at Apple's market value and Chicago's GDP and found that Apple has a value of $803 billion, while Chicago's GDP is 'only' $581 billion. In fact, Google with $654 billion also surpasses the Windy City. Both companies may eventually catch Los Angeles, which has a GDP of $832 billion. But the Big Apple lives up to its name, New York City with a GDP of more than $1.4 TRILLION. You can read more from MarketWatch here.
  • After a bomb detonated at a concert in Manchester, England, killing and injuring dozens, KIRO-TV asked a retired FBI agent what he thinks about and prepares for at large events.  >> Read more trending news  Retired FBI agent David Gomez said people should think about the following before attending a concert, sporting event or large gathering:  1. Don’t push through crowds to exit at the end of the show. While many fans are eager to beat the traffic, Gomez said he intentionally hangs back.  “I’m usually in no hurry to leave. Let the big crowds progress first. Let me have a clear space where I can watch,” Gomez said.  He said it’s harder to be aware of your surroundings when you’re shoulder to shoulder with the crowd. If someone on the outside is waiting to target a large group of people leaving a venue, the person will generally attack the first wave of people out the door.  2. Before the show starts, find the closest exit. Before the concert starts, look around for the closest exit. This might sometimes be a door toward the back of the venue, away from the doors where people entered.  Gomez compared it to the way he sometimes chooses where to sit in a restaurant: “We pick a table that’s away from the front door and close to the exit, rear door, so I know if somebody’s going to come in the front door and rob the establishment, or is going to shoot somebody in the establishment, I have an exit that’s not close to the front door.”  If someone enters through the back door, Gomez said he still has a clear line to the front door.  3. Note the security staff closest to you.  Know where they are in case you need to report suspicious activity or ask for help. In case of an emergency, they will likely be issuing instructions.  4. Discuss a meeting place for your group if you get separated. Make plans ahead of time so that if you are separated from your party, everyone knows where to meet. Members of your group should know that the spot might be adjusted if there is a threat inside the venue vs. the outside.  5. Observe who and what is around you -- not what’s on your phone screen. Matthew McLellan, a student on Mercer Island, told KIRO-TV he has attended concerts where many people are on their phones. He said he likes to send Snapchat photos to share his concert experience.  But McLellan said that because of this week’s attack, he’ll be thinking twice.  “It was shocking,” McLellan said. “Just seeing the numbers (of casualties) increase every couple of hours just hurts me.”  6. If something happens and you can’t find an exit, shelter in place.  Gomez said one girl who attended the concert in Manchester was reported to have stayed in her spot on the third level of the venue because she couldn’t find an easy way out. Police eventually entered the building to help people get out. 7. Before you go, check the venue website for specific entry rules. Some venues require clear bags only; some performers specifically call for no use of cellphones. Read the information on your ticket and on the venue website carefully before you leave the house so you won’t be turned away at the door or kicked out.  >> Related: Manchester attack at Ariana Grande concert: What we know now   
  • Tulsa police say 29-year-old Jerrica Lackey met a man online who eventually convinced her to touch a child. Lackey told police she sent the videos of the abuse to the man. She was arrested on five complaints of sexual abuse of a child under 12.  
  • Tuesday, Oklahoma lawmakers reacted to a $4.1 trillion budget proposal with a note of cautious optimism. Rep. Tom Cole made it clear the plan won’t make it through Congress unscathed. “There’s quite a bit of the president’s budget that simply aren’t (sic) going to be supported by any Democrats at all,” he said. “It’s good to have his sense of priorities, but we also have to be realistic about what we can fashion and pass.” He went on to say “our final product will be better because we had the president’s input, but it certainly won’t mirror the president’s proposals.” Senator James Lankford also noted that the president’s plan is only the beginning of the process. “The White House’s proposed FY2018 budget is the start of a long conversation on how to best fund the federal government for the next year,” he said in an email sent to KRMG. “I am glad to see that the Trump Administration is trying to address the nation’s long-term budget crisis with a budget proposal that balances in 10 years.” Critics, however, say the projections of a balanced budget in ten years rely on a lot of wishful thinking - including a growth in the economy at a rate of 3% a year, something that hasn’t happened in more than a decade. Lankford has also made it clear that the budgeting process itself is flawed, in his opinion. Since it was last reformed in 1974, he wrote, it has only worked four times. “Let’s put an end to the days of continuing resolutions and massive omnibus funding bills,” Lankford said. “It’s time to fix the issue that has been before us for 43 years. I ask Congress to bring responsibility and predictability back to the system and let’s make the needed reforms so that it actually works for the American people.”
  • Someone apparently inadvertently donated more than 100 grams of marijuana when they dropped off some used children's clothes at a suburban Minneapolis shop. The Maplewood Police Department posted a photo on Facebook of the surprise donation to the Once Upon a Child store with an invitation to the owner to come in and claim it. Not surprisingly, no one has come forward yet. The drug was divided up into dozens of little plastic bags. Police Chief Paul Schnell says because it was packaged for distribution or sale, its owner, if identified, could face a felony charge that would carry a sentence of more than a year in jail.
  • Former CIA Director John Brennan told Congress on Tuesday that he was so concerned about intelligence that showed contacts between Russian officials and people linked to the campaign of President Donald Trump, that he warned key members of Congress and other intelligence agencies about the Russian actions, and sent that information on to the FBI for further investigation. It became very clear to me last summer, that Russia was engaged in a very aggressive and wide ranging effort to interfere,” Brennan said, revealing that he had brought in experts from around the U.S. Intelligence Community to try to figure out what the Kremlin was doing. “I encountered and am aware of information and intelligence that revealed contacts and interactions between Russian officials and US Persons involved in the Trump campaign,” Brennan told the House Intelligence Committee, as part of its review of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. elections. At a hearing, Brennan refused to identify anyone by name, or give any indication as to whether the Russians had been successful in getting the “witting or unwitting” help of any Americans, to further the Kremlin’s 2016 efforts. Brennan says he encountered intelligence revealing 'contacts and interactions' between Russian officials, people involved in Trump campaign. pic.twitter.com/5RqwmAVe1U — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) May 23, 2017 Pressed by several GOP lawmakers, Brennan acknowledged that he did not know of any evidence of collusion between the Trump Campaign and the Kremlin – but Brennan said that was for the FBI to investigate, not the CIA. “I don’t know whether or not such collusion – and that’s your term – such collusion existed, I don’t know,” Brennan said. Brennan also denied that he had made last minute requests to unmask names of any U.S. Persons – possibly linked to the Trump Campaign – before the former CIA Director left the agency as President Trump was sworn into office on January 20, 2017. Gowdy asks if Brennan made unmasking request on his last day (Jan 20 ) and Brennan says he did not. — Laura Rozen (@lrozen) May 23, 2017 The Russia investigation was also grabbing the attention of Senators at the same time, as Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats refused to say whether he had been pressured by the President – or by White House officials – to try to get the FBI to drop its investigation into the Russia matter. “I don’t feel it’s appropriate to characterize conversations with the President,” Coats said. A former Senator, Coats seemed ill at ease as he sidestepped the queries of some of his former colleagues. Intel chief Dan Coats says he can’t comment on reports Trump asked the him to deny evidence of Russia collusion https://t.co/P0m0kAvn09 — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) May 23, 2017
  • While other Harvard University students were writing papers for their senior theses, Obasi Shaw was busy rapping his. Shaw is the first student in Harvard's history to submit a rap album as a senior thesis in the English Department, the university said. The album, called 'Liminal Minds,' has earned the equivalent of an A-minus grade, good enough to guarantee that Shaw will graduate with honors next week. Count Shaw among those most surprised by the success. 'I never thought it would be accepted by Harvard,' said Shaw, a 20-year-old from Stone Mountain, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta. 'I didn't think they would respect rap as an art form enough for me to do it.' Shaw describes the 10-track album as a dark and moody take on what it means to be black in America. Each song is told from a different character's perspective, an idea inspired by Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century classic 'The Canterbury Tales.' Shaw, who's black, also draws on the works of writer James Baldwin while tackling topics ranging from police violence to slavery. Shaw's thesis adviser, Harvard English lecturer Josh Bell, said Shaw is a 'serious artist and he's an amazing guy.' 'He was able to turn around an album that people in the English Department would like very much but also that people who like rap music might like,' Bell said. Harvard undergraduates aren't obligated to submit senior theses, but most departments require it to graduate with honors. Often it takes the form of a research paper, but students can apply to turn in an artistic work as a creative thesis. Some submit screenplays, novels or poetry collections. Shaw was at home for winter break in 2015, struggling to find a topic for a written thesis, when he told his mother, Michelle Shaw, about the creative thesis option. He had recently started writing his own raps and performing them at open-microphone nights on campus. His mother connected the dots and suggested he record an album for his thesis. It took Shaw more than a year to write the songs and record them at a studio on Harvard's campus. His friends supplied many of the beats, while he taught himself how to mix the tracks into a polished product. 'I'm still not satisfied with the quality of the production just yet, but I'm constantly learning and growing,' Shaw said. Rap and hip-hop have drawn growing interest from academia in recent years. Harvard established a fellowship for scholars of hip-hop in 2013, and other schools including the University of Arizona have started to offer minors in hip-hop studies. Clemson University announced in February that a doctoral student submitted a 34-track rap album as his dissertation, a first for the South Carolina university. Shaw plans to circulate the album online for free and hopes it opens doors to the music industry. In the meantime, he's headed to Seattle to work as a software engineer at Google. ___ Find Collin Binkley on Twitter: @cbinkley.
  • English actor Sir Roger Moore, best known for his portrayal of fictional secret agent James Bond, has died, family members said in a statement Tuesday morning. He was 89. >> Read more trending news Moore died Tuesday in Switzerland after 'a short but brave battle with cancer,' said his children, Deborah, Geoffrey and Christian, in a statement. 'The affection our father felt whenever he walked on to a stage or in front of a camera buoyed him hugely and kept him busy working into his 90th year, through to his last appearance in November 2016 on stage at London's Royal Festival Hall,' the statement said. 'The capacity crowd cheered him on and off stage, shaking the very foundations of the building just a short distance from where he was born.' Moore played James Bond in seven films between 1973 and 1985.
  • Ariana Grande took to social media Monday night to express her sorrow over a deadly explosion that killed at least 22 people - including children - and injured 59 after her concert at England's Manchester Arena. 'Broken,' tweeted he pop star, who was not hurt in the incident. 'From the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don't have words.'   broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don't have words.-- Ariana Grande (@ArianaGrande) May 23, 2017  Her manager, Scooter Braun, also issued a statement. 'Tonight, our hearts are broken. Words cannot express our sorrow for the victims and families harmed in this senseless attack,' he wrote. 'We mourn the lives of children and loved ones taken by this cowardly act. We are thankful for the selfless service tonight of Manchester's first responders who rushed towards danger to help save lives. We ask all of you to hold the victims, their families, and all those affected in your hearts and prayers.'   pic.twitter.com/BOHKwMx4wW-- Scooter Braun (@scooterbraun) May 23, 2017  According to The Associated Press, the blast, which occurred about 10:30 p.m. after Grande's show, is believed to be a terrorist attack carried out by a male suicide bomber, police said early Tuesday. >> Read more trending news 
  • While some of the plans proposed in President Donald Trump’s $4.1 trillion budget for 2018 seem unlikely to be approved by the Congress, the document sets out a unique road map of how the Trump Administration views a variety of functions within the federal government, and what items the White House would like to get rid of – big and small. Here are eight things you might have missed in the fine print of the 2018 Trump budget: 1. An effort to close down excess military bases. The Trump budget includes a provision to start a round of military base closures in 2021, an idea that is sure to draw strong opposition, despite clear evidence that the military has too much overhead and infrastructure. Lawmakers have routinely rejected such efforts in recent years, with some still simmering about the impact of past base closure rounds – especially the last one in 2005. “The Department of Defense (DOD) has approximately 20 percent excess infrastructure capacity across all Military Departments,” the budget argues. While it may make sense to some, the odds are probably stacked against this provision in the Congress. File this under 'things that will go nowhere.' Trump's Pentagon budget proposes a BRAC, @LeoShane writes. https://t.co/xnvAv755VV — Valerie Insinna (@ValerieInsinna) May 23, 2017 2. End funding for public broadcasting. For a number of years, Republicans have pushed to reduce the amount of money that the feds put into public broadcasting, and President Trump’s plan would do away with almost all the $484 million being spent this year on such activities, leaving $30 million to wind down operations. The White House argues that PBS and NPR ” could make up the shortfall by increasing revenues from corporate sponsors, foundations, and members.” As with the effort to close down military bases, the odds would seem to be against this – but Congress will have the final say. As expected, Trump's budget calls for zeroing out funding for public broadcasting, arts and humanities. https://t.co/79EO9ZOeJM — Ted Johnson (@tedstew) May 23, 2017 3. When is a Medicaid cut not a Medicaid cut? I have always tried to be very careful about using the term “cut” – because too often, there are not budget cuts, but just reductions in the level of increase in a program. Let’s look at Medicaid in the President’s 2018 budget as an example: If you look at this graphic, you will see how the President’s budget would save $610 billion by reforming Medicaid. The second set of figures is the “baseline” for Medicaid – where spending would go without any changes. That says $408 billion would be spent on Medicaid in 2018, ending up at $688 billion in 2027. The bottom graphic is the Trump proposal, which has Medicaid at $404 billion in 2018 and $524 billion in 2027. “There’s not cuts at all,” said Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS). “It’s a matter of slowing the growth rate.” Yes, the Trump plan would spend less money than current built-in automatic growth rate, but the overall amount still goes up over the ten year budget. 4. But those are real cuts at CDC and NIH. One of the areas with some of the strongest bipartisan support is on medical research at the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. And so, when the numbers came in on Tuesday, there was a bipartisan negative reaction on cuts to NIH and CDC. NIH funding would be reduced by from $31.8 billion to $25.9 billion. CDC’s budget would go down $1.2 billion, a 17 percent cut. It’s a pretty good bet that lawmakers will not approve those cuts suggested by the President. The former head of the CDC expressed his displeasure: Proposed CDC budget: unsafe at any level of enactment. Would increase illness, death, risks to Americans, and health care costs. — Dr. Tom Frieden (@DrFrieden) May 23, 2017 5. Still few details on funding infrastructure plan. For months, the President and his top aides have talked about a $1 trillion infrastructure plan to build new roads and bridges in the United States. There was a fact sheet released by the White House, setting out some ideas, like rolling back regulations on how infrastructure projects are developed, but no new pot of money to fund $200 billion in seed money. “Providing more federal funding, on its own, is not the solution to our infrastructure challenges,” the White House noted. One of the few ideas offered was to allow states to levy tolls on interstate highways, and allow private companies to run rest areas. The Trump plan reduces spending from the highway trust fund by $95 billion over ten years. 6. Farm country not pleased with Trump budget details. If you had an infrared heat detector just off the Senate floor today, you might have seen the steam coming from the ears of Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), the Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee. Speaking with reporters, Roberts – well known for his dry wit – suggested the White House needs to make its budget writers count to 60 multiple times every day – to remind them that 60 votes would be needed for major farm policy spending changes. The Trump plan would save $38 billion over 10 years by limiting crop insurance subsidies and eligibility, streamlining conservation programs and more. Outside groups quickly made their voices heard on the proposed changes as well. It is hard to imagine these plans becoming law. The time and place to debate farm bill programs is during the #farmbill, not the annual budget. #Budget2018 — NCGA Public Policy (@NCGA_DC) May 23, 2017 7. Legal Services Corporation again on the chopping block. One of the first debates that I distinctly remember from my first summer on Capitol Hill in 1980 was an effort to cut money from the non-profit Legal Services Corporation, which provides legal aid to low income Americans. The LSC budget is $384 million for this year, and under the Trump plan, would be cut down to around $30 million, to allow for operations to be terminated. Again, this is another budget cut that seems unlikely to be approved, as GOP lawmakers, like Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), are already saying they oppose such a plan. I support funding of @LSCtweets. #READ why it's important via @daytondailynews: https://t.co/VZL37GU0CL — US Rep. Mike Turner (@RepMikeTurner) May 20, 2017 8. Trump wants to sell D.C. drinking water authority. Created by Congress in 1859, the Washington Aqueduct brings drinking water to Washington, D.C., and parts of the Virginia suburbs. While the drinking facilities operate under the auspices of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the water customers pay for all the operation and maintenance costs, as well as any improvements. Why does the White House want to sell this? “Ownership of local water supply is best carried out by State or local government or the private sector where there are appropriate market and regulatory incentives,” the budget documents state. It’s not clear how the feds estimated that selling the authority would bring in $119 million for Uncle Sam. Very proud to be your public servants! pic.twitter.com/BEOQXuYhmu — Washington Aqueduct (@WAqueduct) May 8, 2017 If you want to read more of the details about the Trump 2018 budget, you can find those on the White House website.
  • How much are the biggest tech companies worth? Try looking at the entire Chicago skyline. Just for comparison's sake, MarketWatch says Bank of America/Merrill Lynch looked at Apple's market value and Chicago's GDP and found that Apple has a value of $803 billion, while Chicago's GDP is 'only' $581 billion. In fact, Google with $654 billion also surpasses the Windy City. Both companies may eventually catch Los Angeles, which has a GDP of $832 billion. But the Big Apple lives up to its name, New York City with a GDP of more than $1.4 TRILLION. You can read more from MarketWatch here.
  • After a bomb detonated at a concert in Manchester, England, killing and injuring dozens, KIRO-TV asked a retired FBI agent what he thinks about and prepares for at large events.  >> Read more trending news  Retired FBI agent David Gomez said people should think about the following before attending a concert, sporting event or large gathering:  1. Don’t push through crowds to exit at the end of the show. While many fans are eager to beat the traffic, Gomez said he intentionally hangs back.  “I’m usually in no hurry to leave. Let the big crowds progress first. Let me have a clear space where I can watch,” Gomez said.  He said it’s harder to be aware of your surroundings when you’re shoulder to shoulder with the crowd. If someone on the outside is waiting to target a large group of people leaving a venue, the person will generally attack the first wave of people out the door.  2. Before the show starts, find the closest exit. Before the concert starts, look around for the closest exit. This might sometimes be a door toward the back of the venue, away from the doors where people entered.  Gomez compared it to the way he sometimes chooses where to sit in a restaurant: “We pick a table that’s away from the front door and close to the exit, rear door, so I know if somebody’s going to come in the front door and rob the establishment, or is going to shoot somebody in the establishment, I have an exit that’s not close to the front door.”  If someone enters through the back door, Gomez said he still has a clear line to the front door.  3. Note the security staff closest to you.  Know where they are in case you need to report suspicious activity or ask for help. In case of an emergency, they will likely be issuing instructions.  4. Discuss a meeting place for your group if you get separated. Make plans ahead of time so that if you are separated from your party, everyone knows where to meet. Members of your group should know that the spot might be adjusted if there is a threat inside the venue vs. the outside.  5. Observe who and what is around you -- not what’s on your phone screen. Matthew McLellan, a student on Mercer Island, told KIRO-TV he has attended concerts where many people are on their phones. He said he likes to send Snapchat photos to share his concert experience.  But McLellan said that because of this week’s attack, he’ll be thinking twice.  “It was shocking,” McLellan said. “Just seeing the numbers (of casualties) increase every couple of hours just hurts me.”  6. If something happens and you can’t find an exit, shelter in place.  Gomez said one girl who attended the concert in Manchester was reported to have stayed in her spot on the third level of the venue because she couldn’t find an easy way out. Police eventually entered the building to help people get out. 7. Before you go, check the venue website for specific entry rules. Some venues require clear bags only; some performers specifically call for no use of cellphones. Read the information on your ticket and on the venue website carefully before you leave the house so you won’t be turned away at the door or kicked out.  >> Related: Manchester attack at Ariana Grande concert: What we know now   
  • Tulsa police say 29-year-old Jerrica Lackey met a man online who eventually convinced her to touch a child. Lackey told police she sent the videos of the abuse to the man. She was arrested on five complaints of sexual abuse of a child under 12.  
  • Tuesday, Oklahoma lawmakers reacted to a $4.1 trillion budget proposal with a note of cautious optimism. Rep. Tom Cole made it clear the plan won’t make it through Congress unscathed. “There’s quite a bit of the president’s budget that simply aren’t (sic) going to be supported by any Democrats at all,” he said. “It’s good to have his sense of priorities, but we also have to be realistic about what we can fashion and pass.” He went on to say “our final product will be better because we had the president’s input, but it certainly won’t mirror the president’s proposals.” Senator James Lankford also noted that the president’s plan is only the beginning of the process. “The White House’s proposed FY2018 budget is the start of a long conversation on how to best fund the federal government for the next year,” he said in an email sent to KRMG. “I am glad to see that the Trump Administration is trying to address the nation’s long-term budget crisis with a budget proposal that balances in 10 years.” Critics, however, say the projections of a balanced budget in ten years rely on a lot of wishful thinking - including a growth in the economy at a rate of 3% a year, something that hasn’t happened in more than a decade. Lankford has also made it clear that the budgeting process itself is flawed, in his opinion. Since it was last reformed in 1974, he wrote, it has only worked four times. “Let’s put an end to the days of continuing resolutions and massive omnibus funding bills,” Lankford said. “It’s time to fix the issue that has been before us for 43 years. I ask Congress to bring responsibility and predictability back to the system and let’s make the needed reforms so that it actually works for the American people.”