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    Baltimore has removed statues that honored the Confederacy in the city overnight. Crews worked in Wyman Park starting around midnight Wednesday to remove the Lee and Jackson monument.  >> Read more trending news  They took down the statues of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson early Wednesday after the city council passed a resolution Monday that ordered the immediate destruction of the monuments, WBAL reported. The board cited the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia for the quick removal. “Destroyed. I want them destroyed, and as soon as possible. I want them destroyed,” city councilman Brandon Scott said Monday. The statues may be sent to Confederate cemeteries after Mayor Catherine Pugh reached out to the Maryland Historical Trust for permission to remove the monuments, WBAL reported. The removal didn’t come without cost. WBAL reported Monday that the bill could be between $1 million and $2 million. The city had four monuments to the Confederacy: a Confederate women’s monument, a soldiers’ and sailors’ monument, the Lee and Jackson monument and a statue of Robert Taney, a former Supreme Court Chief Justice who wrote the Dred Scott ruling in 1857, WRC reported. Baltimore isn’t the only area that is trying to erase its Confederate history.  North Carolina’s governor said he is trying to reverse a law that prohibits the removal or relocation of monuments in the state. Dallas’ mayor is looking at the city’s options. Tennessee’s governor called for the removal of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s bust. Forrest was an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan. The Sons of the Confederate Veterans have spoken out about the removal of the monuments across the country. “These statues were erected over 100 years ago to honor the history of the United states. They’re just as important to the entire history of the U.S. as the monuments to our other forefathers,” Thomas V. Strain Jr. told WRC.
  • U.S. Coast Guard and Army officials were responding Wednesday morning to reports of a downed Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter off the coast of Hawaii. >> Read more trending news The helicopter had five crew on board when it reportedly went down, Coast Guard officials said. Officials spotted a debris field just before 11:30 p.m. local time Tuesday near Oahu’s Keana Point.
  • The head of the Georgia-based company that makes Tiki torches says he was offended by images of white supremacists marching through Charlottesville, Virginia, using his company's products. W.C. Bradley Co. President and CEO Marc Olivie said on Tuesday he has special reason to feel deeply offended. “Obviously, we cannot control the way people use our torches, but the fact the people who promote bigotry and promote hatred are using these torches was really shocking to me,” he said. Many of the protesters who marched Friday carried Tiki torches. The Tiki brand is a product of Lamplight, a Wisconsin company that is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Bradley company. Lamplight, in a Facebook post Saturday, said, in part, 'TIKI Brand is not associated in any way with the events that took place in Charlottesville and (we) are deeply saddened and disappointed.' Olivie said the torches are a shining light symbolizing joy, not division and hatred. “I would hope people would continue to use them for enjoyment and being together with friends and family. And that's the way these products should be used,” he said. Tiki brand's 70 employees were also upset to see their product used in the controversial march.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention want parents to think about Type 2 Diabetes, that’s what used to be called adult-onset diabetes. >> Read more trending news It almost never happened to kids or teenagers, instead kids would get Type 1 or juvenile diabetes. Now with about one-third of American children being overweight, doctors are starting to see Type 2 diabetes in children, sometimes as young as 10 years old. Typically it’s happening in their teen years when hormone fluctuations make it harder for the body to absorb insulin. What can you do? Worry about weight. People who are overweight or more likely to have insulin resistance, especially if they have excess weight around their bellies. The CDC offers these tips: Limit TV time (and the mindless eating that comes with it.) Drink more water and fewer sugary drinks. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no juice before age 1, 4 ounces or less a day for toddlers and 8 ounces or less for children.  Eat more fruits and vegetables. Make favorite foods healthier. Get kids involved in making healthier meals. Eat slowly — it takes at least 20 minutes to start feeling full. Eat at the dinner table only, not in front of the TV or computer. Shop for food together. Shop on a full stomach so you’re not tempted to buy unhealthy food. Teach your kids to read food labels to understand which foods are healthiest. Have meals together as a family as often as you can. Don’t insist kids clean their plates. Don’t put serving dishes on the table. Serve small portions; let kids ask for seconds. Reward kids with praise instead of food. Get active. Kids should get 60 minutes of activity a day. It doesn’t have to be all together, but it should add up to an hour of movement. That activities helps keep kids at a healthier weight and helps the body better use insulin. The CDC offers these tips: Start slow and build up. Keep it positive — focus on progress. Take parent and kid fitness classes together. Make physical activity more fun; try new things. Ask kids what activities they like best — everyone is different. Encourage kids to join a sports team. Have a “fit kit” available — a jump rope, hand weights, resistance bands. Limit screen time to 2 hours a day. Plan active outings, like hiking or biking. Take walks together. Move more in and out of the house — vacuuming, raking leaves, gardening. Turn chores into games, like racing to see how fast you can clean the house. Care about family history. Your child’s risk factor goes up when they have a family member with Type 2 diabetes or were born to a mom who had gestational diabetes; are African-American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American, Pacific Islander or Alaska Native; or have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or polycystic ovary syndrome. Consult with your doctor if any of these ring true for your child. Usually, a doctor will start testing blood sugar levels at around age 10.
  • President Donald Trump defiantly blamed 'both sides' for the weekend violence between white supremacists and counter-demonstrators in Virginia, seeking to rebuff the widespread criticism of his handling of the emotionally-charged protests while showing sympathy for the fringe group's efforts to preserve Confederate monuments. In doing so, Trump used the bullhorn of the presidency to give voice to the grievances of white nationalists, and aired some of his own. His remarks Tuesday amounted to a rejection of the Republicans, business leaders and White House advisers who earlier this week had pushed the president to more forcefully and specifically condemn the KKK members, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who took to the streets of Charlottesville. The angry exchange with reporters at his skyscraper hotel in New York City laid bare a reality of the Trump presidency: Trump cannot be managed by others or steered away from damaging political land mines. His top aides were stunned by his comments, with some — including new chief of staff John Kelly — standing by helplessly as the president escalated his rhetoric. Standing in the lobby of Trump Tower, Trump acknowledged that there were 'some very bad people' among those who gathered to protest Saturday. But he added: 'You also had people that were very fine people, on both sides.' The rally was organized by white supremacists and other groups under a 'Unite the Right' banner. Organizers said they were initially activated by their objections to the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, but the larger aim was to protest what they saw as an 'anti-white' climate in America. In his remarks, Trump condemned bigoted ideology and called James Alex Fields Jr., who drove his car into a crowd of counter-protester killing a 32-year-old woman, 'a disgrace to himself, his family and his country.' But Trump also expressed support for those seeking to maintain the monument to Lee, equating him with some of the nation's founders who also owned slaves. 'So, this week it's Robert E. Lee,' he said. 'I noticed that Stonewall Jackson's coming down. I wonder, 'is it George Washington next week and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after?' You really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?' He continued: 'You're changing history. You're changing culture.' The president's comments effectively wiped away the more conventional statement he delivered at the White House a day earlier when he branded the white supremacists who take part in violence as 'criminals and thugs.' Trump's advisers had hoped those remarks might quell criticism of his initial response, but the president's retorts Tuesday suggested he had been a reluctant participant in that cleanup effort. Once again, the blowback was swift, including from fellow Republicans. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida said Trump should not allow white supremacists 'to share only part of the blame.' House Speaker Paul Ryan declared in a tweet that 'white supremacy is repulsive' and there should be 'no moral ambiguity,' though he did not specifically address the president. Trump's remarks were welcomed by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, who tweeted: 'Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth.' Some of the president's comments Tuesday mirrored rhetoric from the far-right fringe. A post Monday by the publisher of The Daily Stormer, a notorious neo-Nazi website, predicted that protesters are going to demand that the Washington Monument be torn down. Trump's handling of the weekend violence has raised new and troubling questions, even among some supporters. Members of his own Republican Party have pressured him to be more vigorous in criticizing bigoted groups, and business leaders have begun abandoning a White House jobs panel in response to his comments. White House officials were caught off guard by his remarks Tuesday. He had signed off on a plan to ignore questions from journalists during an event touting infrastructure policies, according to a White House official not authorized to speak publicly about a private discussion. Once behind the lectern and facing the cameras, he overruled the decision. As Trump talked, his aides on the sidelines in the lobby stood in silence. Chief of staff John Kelly crossed his arms and stared down at his shoes, barely glancing at the president. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders looked around the room trying to make eye contact with other senior aides. One young staffer stood with her mouth agape. Kelly was brought into the White House less than a month ago to try to bring order and stability to a chaotic West Wing. Some Trump allies hoped the retired Marine general might be able to succeed where others have failed: controlling some of Trump's impulses. But the remarks Tuesday once again underscored Trump's insistence on airing his complaints and opinions. Democrats were aghast at Trump's comments. Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine said on Twitter that the Charlottesville violence 'was fueled by one side: white supremacists spreading racism, intolerance & intimidation. Those are the facts.' Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii said on Twitter that he no longer views Trump as his president. 'As a Jew, as an American, as a human, words cannot express my disgust and disappointment,' Schatz said. 'This is not my president.' When asked to explain his Saturday comments about Charlottesville, Trump looked down at his notes and again read a section of his initial statement that denounced bigotry but did not single out white supremacists. He then tucked the paper back into his jacket pocket. Trump, who has quickly deemed other deadly incidents in the U.S. and around the world as acts of terrorism, waffled when asked whether the car death was a terrorist attack. 'There is a question. Is it murder? Is it terrorism?' Trump said. 'And then you get into legal semantics. The driver of the car is a murderer and what he did was a horrible, horrible, inexcusable thing.' Trump said he had yet to call the mother of crash victim Heather Heyer, but would soon 'reach out.' He praised her for what he said was a nice statement about him on social media. As he finally walked away from his lectern, he stopped to answer one more shouted question: Would he visit Charlottesville? The president noted he owned property there and said — inaccurately — that it was one of the largest wineries in the United States. ___ AP writers Darlene Superville and Richard Lardner contributed to this report. Pace reported from Washington. ___ Follow Lemire at http://twitter.com/jonlemire and Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC
  • Val Kilmer made a rare public appearance to help mark the birthday of the real-life man who helped make Kilmer a star.  Kilmer was in Tombstone for the “Doc Holli-Days” that help celebrate the life of Doc Holliday, The Associated Press reported. Kilmer portrayed Holliday in the 1993 film “Tombstone.” >> Read more trending news  Kilmer, sporting a cowboy hat and sunglasses, rode through the iconic western town as parade grand marshal in a coach dating back to the 1880s, the Sierra Vista Herald reported. This was the first time Kilmer had returned to Tombstone since the movie came out. Thousands of people, many dressed as characters from the movie and historical time frame, were at the events that featured Kilmer,  the Sierra Vista Herald reported. >>Read: Actor Val Kilmer opens up about rumored cancer diagnosis Earlier this year, Kilmer confirmed during a Reddit Ask Me Anything q&a he had been battling cancer, Variety reported. 
  • An online petition in Tulsa urges the district to rethink a 99-year-old decision to name a school after Robert E. Lee, a confederate general.  The petition had 3,100 signatures by Tuesday afternoon. Four elementary schools in Oklahoma City also bear the names of Lee and other Confederate generals. The outcry started after a white nationalist rally, decrying the planned removal of a Robert E. Lee statue, turned deadly in Charlottesville, Virginia. Three people died Saturday in Charlottesville as counter-protesters clashed with white nationalists. The Tulsa school district released a statement Monday saying officials plan to review the names of all schools in the district to assure they reflect community values. School leaders in Oklahoma City say changing school names can cost as much as $75,000 per school.
  • Age is just a number... and local World War II veteran Roy Angin was not about to let his stop him from making one last airborne jump.  Angin turned 95 on Thursday.  >>PHOTOS: 95-year-old WWII vet makes one last airborne jump  He went through U.S. Army Airborne School in 1940 and served overseas during World War II.  Now, Angin spends his days at the Wesley Meadows Retirement Community where he lives in Hernando, Mississippi.  >> Read more trending news  Saturday, he got a chance to relive his airborne days.  Angin made one last jump, skydiving from 14,500 feet at the West Tennessee Skydiving center in Whiteville, Tennessee.  The awesome moment was captured on camera by Skydive videographer Aleksey Gubanov. Angin's tandem instructor was Alex Coker, and his pilot was Michael Mullins. 
  • As college is starting back up, the Better Business Bureau is warning students and parents or guardians of potential scams targeting them. It is not uncommon this time of year for scammers to try to obtain personal and financial information. 'In addition to the fact that young adults take the longest to detect identity theft, there is a lot of opportunity for scammers to target students as they prepare for class,' said Warren King, president of the Better Business Bureau of Western Pennsylvania.  The BBB offers these tips to avoid falling for these scams: Financial Aid Scams: These scams can include scholarships, financial aid and seminars. A request for some kind of payment up front for a scholarship or student loan is a sign of a scam. Investigate any potential services or consolidation companies by visiting BBB.com or calling 877-267-5222. They also recommend visiting the U.S. Department of Education’s website for information.  Online Income Scams: These scams are intended to target students who are unemployed with a quick and easy way to make money. Always research the company's name and website before participating in these opportunities. Things to consider are how long the company has been in business and any former complaints it has received.  Roommate/Rental Scams: In these scams, students are targeted by posts on Craigslist from others looking for a roommate. The BBB suggests to always confirm exactly who you are dealing with by asking for their name, street address and telephone number. Never wire money back to somebody even if it seems like it was a mistake. Also, avoid accepting payments for more than the agreed price and never assume that a check is legitimate.  Online Shopping Scams: Since many students shop online for convenience, these scammers are targeting students by selling highly wanted items at a large discounted price. Different online companies are also offering trial offers that may end up charging you in the long run. Before purchasing any merchandise online, make sure the URL link starts with https and look for a small lock icon in the corner of the URL bar. And always confirm the business to check for legitimacy and try contacting them to verify.  For additional back-to-school tips to avoid being a victim of these scams, visit the Better Business Bureau website at BBB.com and report any scams to the BBB scam tracker to help prevent others from falling for these scams.  Information provided by the Better Business Bureau.
  • A lawsuit claims a suburban Philadelphia woman got an extra topping in her Chick-fil-A sandwich: a dead rodent. Ellen Manfalouti sued in Bucks County Court over the tiny rodent she claims was baked into the bottom bun of her chicken sandwich. The 46-year-old tells The Philadelphia Inquirer her co-worker picked up the sandwich at a Langhorne restaurant in November. The two started to eat when she 'felt something funny' and thought the bun was burned. Her co-worker says she knew it was a rodent because she saw the whiskers and tail. Manfalouti's lawyer says the franchise owner and store weren't responsive to their complaints. Owner Dave Heffernan and the Atlanta-based fast-food chain say they can't comment on litigation. Manfalouti is seeking more than $50,000 for physical and psychological damages.
  • Baltimore has removed statues that honored the Confederacy in the city overnight. Crews worked in Wyman Park starting around midnight Wednesday to remove the Lee and Jackson monument.  >> Read more trending news  They took down the statues of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson early Wednesday after the city council passed a resolution Monday that ordered the immediate destruction of the monuments, WBAL reported. The board cited the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia for the quick removal. “Destroyed. I want them destroyed, and as soon as possible. I want them destroyed,” city councilman Brandon Scott said Monday. The statues may be sent to Confederate cemeteries after Mayor Catherine Pugh reached out to the Maryland Historical Trust for permission to remove the monuments, WBAL reported. The removal didn’t come without cost. WBAL reported Monday that the bill could be between $1 million and $2 million. The city had four monuments to the Confederacy: a Confederate women’s monument, a soldiers’ and sailors’ monument, the Lee and Jackson monument and a statue of Robert Taney, a former Supreme Court Chief Justice who wrote the Dred Scott ruling in 1857, WRC reported. Baltimore isn’t the only area that is trying to erase its Confederate history.  North Carolina’s governor said he is trying to reverse a law that prohibits the removal or relocation of monuments in the state. Dallas’ mayor is looking at the city’s options. Tennessee’s governor called for the removal of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s bust. Forrest was an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan. The Sons of the Confederate Veterans have spoken out about the removal of the monuments across the country. “These statues were erected over 100 years ago to honor the history of the United states. They’re just as important to the entire history of the U.S. as the monuments to our other forefathers,” Thomas V. Strain Jr. told WRC.
  • U.S. Coast Guard and Army officials were responding Wednesday morning to reports of a downed Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter off the coast of Hawaii. >> Read more trending news The helicopter had five crew on board when it reportedly went down, Coast Guard officials said. Officials spotted a debris field just before 11:30 p.m. local time Tuesday near Oahu’s Keana Point.
  • The head of the Georgia-based company that makes Tiki torches says he was offended by images of white supremacists marching through Charlottesville, Virginia, using his company's products. W.C. Bradley Co. President and CEO Marc Olivie said on Tuesday he has special reason to feel deeply offended. “Obviously, we cannot control the way people use our torches, but the fact the people who promote bigotry and promote hatred are using these torches was really shocking to me,” he said. Many of the protesters who marched Friday carried Tiki torches. The Tiki brand is a product of Lamplight, a Wisconsin company that is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Bradley company. Lamplight, in a Facebook post Saturday, said, in part, 'TIKI Brand is not associated in any way with the events that took place in Charlottesville and (we) are deeply saddened and disappointed.' Olivie said the torches are a shining light symbolizing joy, not division and hatred. “I would hope people would continue to use them for enjoyment and being together with friends and family. And that's the way these products should be used,” he said. Tiki brand's 70 employees were also upset to see their product used in the controversial march.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention want parents to think about Type 2 Diabetes, that’s what used to be called adult-onset diabetes. >> Read more trending news It almost never happened to kids or teenagers, instead kids would get Type 1 or juvenile diabetes. Now with about one-third of American children being overweight, doctors are starting to see Type 2 diabetes in children, sometimes as young as 10 years old. Typically it’s happening in their teen years when hormone fluctuations make it harder for the body to absorb insulin. What can you do? Worry about weight. People who are overweight or more likely to have insulin resistance, especially if they have excess weight around their bellies. The CDC offers these tips: Limit TV time (and the mindless eating that comes with it.) Drink more water and fewer sugary drinks. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no juice before age 1, 4 ounces or less a day for toddlers and 8 ounces or less for children.  Eat more fruits and vegetables. Make favorite foods healthier. Get kids involved in making healthier meals. Eat slowly — it takes at least 20 minutes to start feeling full. Eat at the dinner table only, not in front of the TV or computer. Shop for food together. Shop on a full stomach so you’re not tempted to buy unhealthy food. Teach your kids to read food labels to understand which foods are healthiest. Have meals together as a family as often as you can. Don’t insist kids clean their plates. Don’t put serving dishes on the table. Serve small portions; let kids ask for seconds. Reward kids with praise instead of food. Get active. Kids should get 60 minutes of activity a day. It doesn’t have to be all together, but it should add up to an hour of movement. That activities helps keep kids at a healthier weight and helps the body better use insulin. The CDC offers these tips: Start slow and build up. Keep it positive — focus on progress. Take parent and kid fitness classes together. Make physical activity more fun; try new things. Ask kids what activities they like best — everyone is different. Encourage kids to join a sports team. Have a “fit kit” available — a jump rope, hand weights, resistance bands. Limit screen time to 2 hours a day. Plan active outings, like hiking or biking. Take walks together. Move more in and out of the house — vacuuming, raking leaves, gardening. Turn chores into games, like racing to see how fast you can clean the house. Care about family history. Your child’s risk factor goes up when they have a family member with Type 2 diabetes or were born to a mom who had gestational diabetes; are African-American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American, Pacific Islander or Alaska Native; or have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or polycystic ovary syndrome. Consult with your doctor if any of these ring true for your child. Usually, a doctor will start testing blood sugar levels at around age 10.
  • President Donald Trump defiantly blamed 'both sides' for the weekend violence between white supremacists and counter-demonstrators in Virginia, seeking to rebuff the widespread criticism of his handling of the emotionally-charged protests while showing sympathy for the fringe group's efforts to preserve Confederate monuments. In doing so, Trump used the bullhorn of the presidency to give voice to the grievances of white nationalists, and aired some of his own. His remarks Tuesday amounted to a rejection of the Republicans, business leaders and White House advisers who earlier this week had pushed the president to more forcefully and specifically condemn the KKK members, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who took to the streets of Charlottesville. The angry exchange with reporters at his skyscraper hotel in New York City laid bare a reality of the Trump presidency: Trump cannot be managed by others or steered away from damaging political land mines. His top aides were stunned by his comments, with some — including new chief of staff John Kelly — standing by helplessly as the president escalated his rhetoric. Standing in the lobby of Trump Tower, Trump acknowledged that there were 'some very bad people' among those who gathered to protest Saturday. But he added: 'You also had people that were very fine people, on both sides.' The rally was organized by white supremacists and other groups under a 'Unite the Right' banner. Organizers said they were initially activated by their objections to the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, but the larger aim was to protest what they saw as an 'anti-white' climate in America. In his remarks, Trump condemned bigoted ideology and called James Alex Fields Jr., who drove his car into a crowd of counter-protester killing a 32-year-old woman, 'a disgrace to himself, his family and his country.' But Trump also expressed support for those seeking to maintain the monument to Lee, equating him with some of the nation's founders who also owned slaves. 'So, this week it's Robert E. Lee,' he said. 'I noticed that Stonewall Jackson's coming down. I wonder, 'is it George Washington next week and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after?' You really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?' He continued: 'You're changing history. You're changing culture.' The president's comments effectively wiped away the more conventional statement he delivered at the White House a day earlier when he branded the white supremacists who take part in violence as 'criminals and thugs.' Trump's advisers had hoped those remarks might quell criticism of his initial response, but the president's retorts Tuesday suggested he had been a reluctant participant in that cleanup effort. Once again, the blowback was swift, including from fellow Republicans. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida said Trump should not allow white supremacists 'to share only part of the blame.' House Speaker Paul Ryan declared in a tweet that 'white supremacy is repulsive' and there should be 'no moral ambiguity,' though he did not specifically address the president. Trump's remarks were welcomed by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, who tweeted: 'Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth.' Some of the president's comments Tuesday mirrored rhetoric from the far-right fringe. A post Monday by the publisher of The Daily Stormer, a notorious neo-Nazi website, predicted that protesters are going to demand that the Washington Monument be torn down. Trump's handling of the weekend violence has raised new and troubling questions, even among some supporters. Members of his own Republican Party have pressured him to be more vigorous in criticizing bigoted groups, and business leaders have begun abandoning a White House jobs panel in response to his comments. White House officials were caught off guard by his remarks Tuesday. He had signed off on a plan to ignore questions from journalists during an event touting infrastructure policies, according to a White House official not authorized to speak publicly about a private discussion. Once behind the lectern and facing the cameras, he overruled the decision. As Trump talked, his aides on the sidelines in the lobby stood in silence. Chief of staff John Kelly crossed his arms and stared down at his shoes, barely glancing at the president. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders looked around the room trying to make eye contact with other senior aides. One young staffer stood with her mouth agape. Kelly was brought into the White House less than a month ago to try to bring order and stability to a chaotic West Wing. Some Trump allies hoped the retired Marine general might be able to succeed where others have failed: controlling some of Trump's impulses. But the remarks Tuesday once again underscored Trump's insistence on airing his complaints and opinions. Democrats were aghast at Trump's comments. Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine said on Twitter that the Charlottesville violence 'was fueled by one side: white supremacists spreading racism, intolerance & intimidation. Those are the facts.' Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii said on Twitter that he no longer views Trump as his president. 'As a Jew, as an American, as a human, words cannot express my disgust and disappointment,' Schatz said. 'This is not my president.' When asked to explain his Saturday comments about Charlottesville, Trump looked down at his notes and again read a section of his initial statement that denounced bigotry but did not single out white supremacists. He then tucked the paper back into his jacket pocket. Trump, who has quickly deemed other deadly incidents in the U.S. and around the world as acts of terrorism, waffled when asked whether the car death was a terrorist attack. 'There is a question. Is it murder? Is it terrorism?' Trump said. 'And then you get into legal semantics. The driver of the car is a murderer and what he did was a horrible, horrible, inexcusable thing.' Trump said he had yet to call the mother of crash victim Heather Heyer, but would soon 'reach out.' He praised her for what he said was a nice statement about him on social media. As he finally walked away from his lectern, he stopped to answer one more shouted question: Would he visit Charlottesville? The president noted he owned property there and said — inaccurately — that it was one of the largest wineries in the United States. ___ AP writers Darlene Superville and Richard Lardner contributed to this report. Pace reported from Washington. ___ Follow Lemire at http://twitter.com/jonlemire and Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC