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Healthy green recipes to celebrate St. Patrick's Day

We’re all about celebrating St. Patrick’s Day with some green grub. We also strongly prefer healthy recipes. And sorry, folks — that dyed green beer and bagel aren’t winning any health awards. (In fact, that food coloring may have some not-so-great side effects.) Here are 32 recipes to celebrate being green the healthy way.

BREAKFAST

1. Green Smoothie 
Spinach and kale give this delicious beverage its beautiful green hue. Plus, they offer tons of antioxidants and vitamins (namely iron and vitamins A and C). The addition of banana, mango, and ginger create a distinct, crave-able flavor (and add even more nutritional power). 

2. Green Egg Casserole 
This breakfast dish is perfect for feeding a crowd. Simply throw together some eggs, frozen spinach, milk, whole-grain bread, and cheese and bake until cooked through! Add any other green veggies you like, too (pepper or jalapeno would be especially tasty).

3. Matcha Green Tea and Almond Flour Mini Muffins
Green tea and almonds — two of our favorite superfoods! Better yet, that matcha powder is a great (natural) way to turn just about anything green. Is this the new St. Patrick’s Day celebration staple? We think so.  

4. Shamrock Smoothie
Kiwi and grapes take center stage in this pale-green breakfast smoothie, packed with vitamin C and fiber. (Just please forgo the optional green food coloring the recipe calls for.)

5. Savory Green Pancakes
When classic buttermilk and maple syrup just won’t do, take pancakes the savory route. (They’ll probably go better with that naturally-dyed green beer, too). These cakes get their color from spinach (or any leafy greens) and are flavored with cumin, yogurt, and green onion. Eat up!

6. Matcha Green Tea Coconut Pancakes 
Made with coconut flour, matcha powder, buttermilk, and egg whites, these pancakes are winning the healthy flapjack game. Serve up a stack of these bad boys topped with Greek yogurt, crunchy pistachios, and a drizzle of honey.

7. Detox Pancakes
Rolled oats add some extra fiber to these cakes. Spinach creates the festive color, while banana and cinnamon give them some special flavor.

8. Pear and Arugula Smoothie
A squeeze of fresh orange brightens up this green smoothie. Greek yogurt gives it a protein-rich body, and peppery arugula lends an atypical flavor (which is balanced out by the sweetness of the pear).

SOUPS, SALADS, AND SIDES

9. Colcannon
The classic Irish dish gets revamped here, using kale and leek instead of the traditional cabbage. (Though using kale and cabbage would get you double superfood points!)

10. Crispy Green Beans with Pesto
These lightly sautéed green beans go perfectly with fresh, homemade pesto. This dish is fancy enough to satisfy the foodies at any St. Paddy’s Day get-together and also simple enough that the green-bagel-loving crowd won’t be scared away.

11. Green Rice
Brown rice is simply flavored and given some color with fresh cilantro, peas, and cumin — a simple and flavorful side dish for any table!

12. Minted Pea Mash
This is one simple, healthy, and delicious side dish that will go well with just about any St. Patrick’s Day celebration meal. Plus, it’s bright green. It’s simple to make, too: just a dab of butter, frozen peas, mint, salt, and pepper!

13. Green Tomato Mozzarella Stacks
No, these green tomatoes are not fried. But they still take a delicious center stage in this fun salad recipe. Layer thick slices of fresh green tomatoes with equally sized slices of fresh mozzarella cheese, and drizzle the top with herb-packed green goddess salad dressing.  

SNACKS

14. Fresh Fava Bean Almond Spread
This simple spread is perfect for sharing with a crowd. Plus, it’s easy to customize with whatever type of beans or peas you have available. Fava beans give a nice creamy texture while chopped almonds add some crunch.

15. Cucumber Feta Rolls
Super-thin cucumber slices give these rolls a festive outer layer. Inside, there’s a protein-rich Greek yogurt, feta, sun-dried tomato, and olive filling.

16. Green Falafel
Falafel is one of those go-to drunk foods. Or, basically, the perfect St. Paddy’s afternoon snack! These little guys are full of protein- and fiber-rich chickpeas, parsley, garlic, and cilantro.

For all 32 healthy green recipes, go to Greatist.com


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