ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
45°
Clear
H 49° L 31°
  • cloudy-day
    45°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 49° L 31°
  • clear-night
    32°
    Morning
    Clear. H 49° L 31°
  • clear-day
    60°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 65° L 41°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Pediatricians promote benefits of recess

The American Academy of Pediatrics has two New Year's resolutions for schools: Keep the school nurse and don't drop recess.

The recommendations are part of two new policy statements published in Pediatrics.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says there's a growing trend in schools to take away recess and use the time to teach subjects.

"There is pressure on schools to increase performance on standardized testing, and a lot of times teachers are using withdrawal of recess as a punishment for children," says Robert Murray, MD, a co-author of the recess policy statement and a professor at the Ohio State University in Columbus.

"Recess is an important part of the school day that should not be cast off without thinking," he says. 

It is not a reward, he says. Recess is necessary and important to help children learn and grow.  

"No matter what kind of recess, whether indoors or outdoors, structured or unstructured, kids need a safe place to play," Murray says. "And the equipment should be good and people who supervise should be well-trained."

Health Benefits of Recess

The benefits of recess are many. "The child who gets regular breaks in the day performs better cognitively in the classroom and gets a lot of social and emotional benefits," he says. "Recess provides kids with the chance to be creative and play with others just for the fun of it."

It doesn't have to be a full hour or half-hour either, he says. Recess can come in shorter bursts of play time sprinkled throughout the school day. "We need to carve out time that belongs to a child."

Recess is not the same as physical education or gym either, says the policy statement's co-author Catherine Ramstetter, PhD. She is a health educator at the Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences in Cincinnati.

"Recess promotes a healthy learning environment. Importantly, recess should be used as a complement to physical education classes, not a substitute," she says. "It would be ideal if every school had deep pockets to build huge, amazing playgrounds. But every kid will play differently anyway, and every school doesn't have the resources. We need to protect recess as it benefits the whole child."

Key Role for School Doctor

A second AAP policy statement wants schools to assign important roles for a school doctor and school nurse.

School doctors serve school districts as advisors, consultants, volunteers, team doctors, or school district doctors.

But there's no single set of rules for states and school districts about what a school doctor should do. The new policy statement wants all school districts to have a doctor to oversee health services.

What's more, school doctors should help coordinate policy and practice plans for kids with chronic health conditions, such as diabetes and asthma. The AAP policy statement says kids spend about seven hours a day,180  days a year, in school. During that time they may only see their doctor once a year.

"Doctors in schools can be consultants to nurses and connect with the nurse in any way possible," Murray says. "Generally, it is a beneficial thing for schools to have a physician that they can easily identify and go to in case of emergency or policy development."

Miami Children's Hospital pediatrician Gloria Riefkohl reviewed the new policy statements for WebMD. She says that there is a role for school doctors. "They can serve as liaisons between the school and the child's medical home. And this can avoid disconnects between what is going on at school and outside of school."

Cynthia Devore, MD, co-author of the policy statement on school doctors, also stressed the role of liaison for a school doctor. 

"The best medical model for management of seizures or diabetes in a medical setting or home might be a rescue medicine that might frighten school staff who are unlicensed lay persons, like a bus driver or a secretary," she says. "The school physician can be a valuable liaison among the medical home, the school, and the family, educating all parties as to what is safe and reasonable, and working with the school nurse to develop a plan that allows for sound medical management of a child."

The school doctor and school nurse enhance one another's contribution to the school, she says. 

"Every school district should have a school physician who is either a pediatrician or a physician with expertise in children, and every school building a school nurse, ideally a registered nurse or school-nurse teacher," she says. "Together, a school physician and school nurse should be a well-oiled team-machine able to implement the goals identified by the medical home and the family into the school setting."

Changing Role of the School Nurse

Budget cuts and funding issues have threatened the school nurse position.

School nurses don't just dispense bandages and ice packs. Far from it, says Cathy Raisher, RN, a nurse manager at a school in Washington, D.C. 

"There are routine playground injuries and illnesses, vision and hearing screening, but there are also an increasing number of kids with diabetes and allergies," she says. "We are always at a heightened state of alert, as things can occur without any warning."

Parents can help make the school nurse's job easier. "Parents, especially those of children with special health needs, should go to the nurse and make sure they have recent health certificates," Raisher says.

"Bring your child and introduce the child to the nurse," she says. It's also helpful to let the nurse know what to look for if your child is having an allergic reaction or how they may look or act if their blood sugar dips through the day.

SOURCES: Gloria Riefkohl, MD, pediatrician, Miami Children's Hospital.Catherine Ramstetter, PhD, health educator, Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Cincinnati.Robert Murray, MD, professor, Ohio State University, Columbus.Cathy Raisher, RN, nurse manager, Washington, D.C.Cynthia Devore, MD, pediatrician, New York City.Devore, C. Pediatrics, January 2013.Murray, R. Pediatrics, January 2013.

© 2012 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • The city of Everett, Washington, ,” but the baristas are not backing down. The baristas are arguing that their skimpy costumes fall under freedom of expression.In recent court filings, the city claimed the coffee stands have a history of prostitution, sexual assault and exploitation. One of Everett's new laws requires the workers to wear a minimum of tank tops and shorts. It specifically applies to employees at 'quick service' restaurants, which also include fast food and food trucks. >> Read more trending news The other redefined the city's lewd conduct ordinance and created a new crime of facilitating lewd conduct. Both ordinances took effect in early September. But seven bikini baristas and the owner of a chain of the coffee stands called 'Hillbilly Hotties' sued the city to block the dress code in September, saying it's vague, unlawfully targets women, and denies them the ability to communicate through their attire.  KIRO-TV asked a constitutional law attorney about that argument.  “That is not a frivolous argument. One can see that this is conduct which may not be pure speech, but nevertheless is a conduct that does enjoy constitutional protections. The question is how much constitutional protection,” said constitutional law attorney Jeffrey Needle. The Everett City Council unanimously passed the ordinances in August but halted the ban while the case is in court.  A senior U.S. district court judge heard the arguments Tuesday in a federal Seattle court.
  • Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11 years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes. But years of legal push back by the industry over every detail means the ads will be less hard-hitting than what was proposed. Tobacco control experts say the campaign — built around network TV and newspapers — will not reach people when they are young and most likely to start smoking. “Their legal strategy is always obstruct, delay, create confusion and buy more time,” said Ruth Malone, of the University of California, San Francisco, who has studied the industry for 20 years. “So by the time this was finally settled, newspapers have a much smaller readership, and nowadays, who watches network TV?” The new spots, which begin Sunday, lay out the toll of smoking in blunt text and voiceover statements: “More people die every year from smoking than from murder, AIDS, suicide, drugs, car crashes and alcohol, combined.” Companies will also acknowledge their role in making cigarettes addictive: “Cigarette companies intentionally designed cigarettes with enough nicotine to create and sustain addiction.”
  • On Black Friday, you’ll want to know which items to stand in line for, and which items to buy after the holiday season has passed. You can end up saving a lot of money (and time) by shopping smart as you weave your way through the crowds or shop online. They may not be the sexiest of gifts, but small and large home appliances often are priced to sell on Black Friday. From electric mixers and coffeemakers to refrigerators and dishwashers, says it’s worth checking out the deals on these items on Black Friday.While some analysts say January, leading up to the Super Bowl, is the best time to find a television at a good price, there are still plenty of TV deals on Black Friday. Keep in mind that lower-end models tend to be priced the most competitively, making Black Friday the perfect time to pick up a television for a second bedroom or the kids’ room. If you are looking for a high-end television, it’s better to wait until after Black Friday.: Shoppers will find many basic laptop models at bargain-basement prices on Black Friday. Power users looking for good deals on high-end laptops should wait until after Black Friday.The same logic applies to tablets. There will be plenty of Black Friday doorbusters featuring basic tablet models; just don’t expect steep discounts on iPads.says gaming system bundles should receive good discounts on Black Friday. In years past, gaming system bundles have been priced up to $50 off the regular price on Black Friday. The furniture sales cycle resets in the summer, so if you wait until Black Friday, you won’t be getting the best deals, according to . And while buying outdoor furniture in winter might seem like a wise plan, retail experts say most of that merchandise has been removed from the floor to make room for holiday items by Black Friday, so you won’t find great deals on the remaining products. Unless your child is hoping for one of this year’s hottest toys, it’s actually better to wait until Cyber Monday or early December to shop for toys, according to . The toy that is priced up to half-off on Black Friday may end up being priced up to 75 percent off if you wait.Avoid spending your shopping money on winter clothing during Black Friday, because it generally sells at a much deeper discount soon after the holiday season ends. You might think that the best time to purchase workout equipment is during Black Friday, but the biggest deals on fitness equipment actually take place right after the turn of the new year.: You can still get your husband that tool set he’s been wanting for Christmas, just wait to purchase it until December, when tools and equipment sell for the largest discounts.There are rarely good deals on gift card purchases on Black Friday. The Street says this is because gift cards are the gift choice of procrastinators, so wait until just before Christmas to score better deals. Although you might want to buy a few special ornaments or decorations for your house on Black Friday, plan ahead by purchasing next year’s décor right after Christmas, when seasonal items are sold at clearance prices.
  • A U.S. Navy aircraft with 11 people on board has crashed into the Pacific Ocean, officials said Wednesday. >> Click here or scroll down for the latest updates >> Read more trending news
  • For those wanting the traditional Thanksgiving feast but who can’t, or don’t want to, do the cooking there are a few restaurants in Tulsa that traditionally use the holiday as a way to thank their customers by offering a free meal. In Tulsa, Tally's Good Food Café at 11th and Yale has offered free Thanksgiving for 30 years; they'll feed people from 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Thursday. Owner Tally Alame tells KRMG he loves Thanksgiving, and loves throwing his doors open to all comers on the holiday. “Coming originally from Lebanon, I experienced Thanksgiving when I came to the country here, and it has to be my favorite time of the year. You can look back and see everything that we are thankful for, and so I just want to share my gratitude with my customers.” This year, he’s also thankful that his success is about to lead to a second location, at 61st and Sheridan. He had hoped to have it opened by Thanksgiving, but says he’ll have to delay until (tentatively) December 11th. Duffy’s Restaurant at 706 S. Elm Place will serve its free meal from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Owner Eddie Chammat tells KRMG it’s about thanking his customers, but also about providing a welcoming place for those who might otherwise be alone on the holiday. Batman's at Pine and Mingo offers free Subway Sandwiches and pie from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. Thanksgiving Day.