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Charity
Wild Brew at Cox Convention Center
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Wild Brew at Cox Convention Center

Wild Brew at Cox Convention Center

Wild Brew at Cox Convention Center

Wild Brew combines Tulsa’s best restaurants with first-rate beers by artisan brewers from the U.S. and around the world. This year's Wild Brew will be on August 23rd 5:00pm-8:00pm at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Tulsa and feature live music by local favorites - Mid-Life Crisis.  Tickets for Wild Brew start at $70 and can be purchased online.

Wild Brew is a terrific event that supports an internationally recognized, nonprofit conservation organization. Funds from the event underwrite educational projects such as the bald eagle nest Web cam, a statewide live bird school program and the Sutton Natural History Forum and scholarship program. These activities teach kids the importance of native birds to our ecosystem in a way that’s fun, meaningful and consistent with Oklahoma school standards. You can take part in this legendary Tulsa event by purchasing a ticket and attending or becoming a sponsor.

THE SUTTON CENTER

Our Mission:

The Sutton Center was founded in 1983 as a nonprofit organization dedicated to funding cooperative conservation solutions for birds and the natural world through science and education. In 1997 the Center affiliated with the University of Oklahoma through the Oklahoma Biological Survey in the College of Arts and Sciences. Our biologists and governing board strive to protect natural resources and environments where birds live and breed. Through their efforts, the Center has become an internationally recognized leader in avian conservation.

Research and Conservation Programs:

One of the Sutton Center’s most successful projects has been re-establishment of the bald eagle as a nesting bird in Oklahoma and other southeastern states. As a result, our national bird was removed from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife in the summer of 2007. Currently, the Center is researching the lesser prairie chicken, identifying threats and developing management techniques to halt the decline of this prairie icon. Other projects include publication of papers related to our prairie songbird conservation program, as well as ongoing surveys of bald eagle nests in Oklahoma, and a seven-year undertaking to produce a full-color Oklahoma Winter Bird Atlas as a companion volume to our Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas.

Education Programs:

The Sutton Center places strong emphasis on education through programs including:

  • It’s All About Birds!  - More than a dozen native and exotic birds fly around the auditorium in an exciting presentation that teaches students about science, biology and the ecosystem. The show highlights the importance of birds in art, history, literature and philosophy.
  • The Sutton Natural History Forum  - Photographers and cinematographers from National Geographic have shared their experiences with more than 53,000 Tulsa area students at this annual event. In addition, the Sutton Center, with support from NatureWorks and corporate sponsors, has awarded more than $85,000 in scholarships to conservation-minded Oklahoma students over the last four years.
  • Bald Eagle Nest Camera  -Continuous Web cam coverage gives viewers in more than 60 countries a rare look at our national bird. Online visitors can watch bald eagles hunt, feed their young and defend the nest.

How You Can Help:

As a nonprofit, the Sutton Center relies on the generous support of business leaders, as well as private and corporate foundations in the communities we serve. To learn more about helping or about our programs, contact the Center at 918.336.7778 or visit www.suttoncenter.org

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