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Concerts
Luke Bryan at the BOK Center
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Luke Bryan at the BOK Center

Luke Bryan at the BOK Center

Luke Bryan at the BOK Center

LUKE BRYAN BRINGS “DIRT ROAD DIARIES TOUR” TO TULSA

Luke’s career has sky-rocketed the last couple of years ending 2012 with some of his best accolades. His latest album tailgates & tanlines produced three back-to-back Platinum singles, became a Top 10 album in 2012 according to SoundScan, and sold seven million tracks. He has placed a total of six career singles at #1 and was named the #1 Artist of 2012 and #1 Male Artist of 2012 by Country Aircheck. Billboard named tailgates & tanlines the #2 Country Album and the #3 Country Artist Album of 2012 and claimed Luke as the #3 Top Country Artist of the Year. Also in 2012, Luke took home 11 music awards, including a record nine wins at the American Country Awards as well as his first American Music Award.

  • WHAT: Luke Bryan with special guests Florida Georgia Line and Thompson Square
  • WHERE: BOK Center
  • WHEN: Saturday, September 14, 2013
  • ON SALE: May 17th @ 10am
  • TICKETS: TBA
  • TICKET INFO: Available online at www.bokcenter.com, Arby’s Box Office, all Tickets.com outlets, or by calling 1-866-7-BOKCTR.

 Luke Bryan’s cache as a seasoned performer has long been recognized by his growing legion of fans and has recently captured the attention of the music community.  His ability to draw great crowds to his concerts became evident earlier this year as it was announced that the first leg of shows on his headline tour, the “Dirt Road Diaries Tour,” all sold-out!  The tour has been extended with a second leg including a concert at BOK Center in Tulsa on Saturday, September 14 with Florida Georgia Line and Thompson Square.

 “I feel like I have waited a lifetime to take my own show on the road,” shared Luke.  “The band and I have a lot of exciting things in store for the fans and are eager to get it started!”

 Luke’s recent Academy of Country Music Award wins for Entertainer of the Year and Vocal Event (“Only Way I Know”) with Eric Church and Jason Aldean, along with his first-time ACM hosting duty with Blake Shelton, are just a few of the career highlights Luke has enjoyed lately.  Additional accolades include multi-Platinum albums sales, back-to-back #1 singles and his first #1 album debut with “Spring Break…Here To Party.”  His spring break shows in Panama City Beach, Florida this past March brought in 120,000 fans during the 2-day concert event and his performance at the Houston Rodeo was the second largest attendance in the rodeo’s history with 75,000 fans.

 His last studio album, tailgates & tanlines¸ produced 3 back-to-back Platinum singles and became a Top 10 album of 2012 and sold seven million tracks.  He has placed a total of six career singles at #1 and was named the #1 Artist of 2012 and #1 Male Artist of 2012 by Country AircheckBillboard named tailgates & tanlines the #2 Country Album and the #3 Country Artist Album of 2012 and claimed Luke as the #3 Top Country Artist of the Year.  Also in 2012, Luke took home 11 music awards, including a record nine wins at the American Country Awards as well as his first American Music Award.

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