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Latest from Dan Potter

    A man calls 911 early Thursday morning, when he hears his neighbor firing a gun.Deputies arrived at a home near West 7th and South Denver, and confronted Michael Pointer.  They spoke with him and then left the property.A short time later, the victim was on Facebook and received a threatening message from Pointer. 'Because TCSO IS A BUNCH OF COWARDS...YOU SHOULD mind your (cuss word) business.'Pointer then went on to dare the victim to call for help again.Deputies say the suspect went back outside and started firing his rifle again.The neighbor took Pointer up on his dare and called 911.This time, he was taken into custody. Pointer's grandmother told deputies he was staying at her place, and was upset with his spouse.
  • You've most likely heard people refer to Tulsa as the 'meth capital of the world.' This week we got a look at new numbers that prove it The CNN Money map published this week tracks the number of contaminated meth labs found in each county in the US from 2004 to last year. Tulsa County had 949 labs. That's more than any other county in the country. Now, the narcotics agents tell us that we have made progress. The number of labs they're finding is actually slowly dropping because of new laws making it hard to get pseudoephedrine, one of the key ingredients in crank. But, even as they say it's improving, they will tell you we won't beat this problem until Sudafed is restricted to prescription-only.
  • According to Reuters, US Airways has made a formal merger proposal to American Airlines parent AMR Corp and its creditors that could value the combined airline at around $8.5 billion. Reuters quotes two sources close to the negotiations. Details of the merger proposal emerged as American Airlines pilots voted to ratify a new union contract on Friday. The new labor contract, approved by nearly three-quarters of the AMR pilots who voted, gives the Allied Pilots' Association a 13.5 percent equity stake in AMR.  
  • When you vote on November 6th, you’ll find more than just the names of candidates on the ballot. There are also six amendments to the state constitution to consider. See the ballot language for all 6 state questions on the Oklahoma Secretary of State's website. This week, KRMG is looking at what each of those ‘state questions’ proposes. Our guide is Heather Hope-Hernandez of the Tulsa Chapter of the League of Women Voters.   We begin with two questions which both deal with capping or eliminating certain kinds of property tax. State Questions 758 and 766: Limitations on property taxes State Question 758 would limit how much property taxes can be raised in any given year. 'Right now,' says Hope-Hernandez, 'increases are limited to 5% of fair cash value in  any taxable year. (SQ 758) will cap the increase to 3% for some property.' Specifically, homestead-exempted property and agricultural land. Hope-Hernandez tells KRMG the League of Women Voters hasn‘t taken a position for or against SQ 758. 'What we are saying is that people need to understand that our property taxes generally go to support common education and that's something to think about when they go to the polls.' State Question 766 also deals with property taxes. It would ban taxes on so-called intangible property, things like patents, inventions, trade secrets, brand names and custom computer software. Read more about State Question 758 and State Question 766 on Ballotpedia.org. State Question 759: Banning Affirmative Action SQ 759 would ban Affirmative Action in state hiring, college scholarships and state business, meaning it would prohibit special treatment based on race or sex in public employment, education and contracts.  The League of Women Voters is strictly non-partisan on candidates and political parties, but Hope-Hernandez says they do take positions on some public policy issues and this is one of them. 'That is a state question the League of Women Voters is opposing,' says Hope-Hernandez, 'The League of Women Voters has a long history of non-discrimination and we feel that Affirmative Action is still an important part of our society to help level the playing field.' Of course, many feel that Affirmative Action is a form of discrimination. 'And,' counters Hope-Hernandez, 'we would disagree with that.' Read more about State Question 759 on Ballotpedia.org Read why the League of Women Voters has taken a position against SQ 759. Read why the American Civil Rights Institute supports SQ 759. State Question 762: Removing the Governor from the parole process for non-violent offenders SQ 762 would take the Governor’s office out of the process of deciding which non-violent state prison inmates get parole. The Tulsa Chapter of the League of Women Voters has only taken a position on two of the state questions, this one included. 'The League of Women Voters supports passage of this one,' says Hope-Hernandez. 'By passing this, the State of Oklahoma will join all of the other states in the nation by removing the Governor and therefore politics, from the parole process.' This question has no organized opposition. Read more about State Question 762 on Ballotpedia.org Read the League of Women Voters position on SQ 762 State Question 764: Allows Oklahoma Water Resources Board to issue bonds Hope-Hernandez says the League of Women Voters has not taken a position on SQ 764. 'Proponents say that this is going to help increase the (board's) leveraging capacity by providing low-interest loans to local governments for water and sewer improvements. We're seeing that there are infrastructure issues all across the state and proponents are saying that this is going to help with those issues. 'Opponents are saying, bottomline, Oklahoma doesn't need to incur any additional debt.' The bonds issued by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board could not exceed $300 million. Read more about State Question 764 on Ballotpedia.org State Question 765: Public Welfare Department amendment 'It abolishes the Department of Human Services.' At least, as it currently exists. Hope-Hernandez says this amendment would move authority for the Human Services Department from the executive to the legislative branch. She says the legislature would then have to 'create a new entity to oversee state care of our neediest children and the aged. 'People who are for this say DHS is out of date and there have been scandals that show that it's not working. 'The opponents of this say that, despite these recent events, the system is not so broken as to require such drastic measures.' Read more about State Question 765 on Ballotpedia.org Additional resources: Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs: State ballot questions at a glance
  • The little ghosts and goblins won't be getting any tricks from Mother Nature this evening. News on 6 Meteorologist Travis Meyer says temperatures should be around 60 when the sun sets. Trav says the winds will be light and there's no chance of rain in the forecast. Temps will fall into the mid 50's by 10 o'clock. The unseasonably warm autumn weather will continue into the weekend with sunshine and daytime highs in the mid 70s. We have a slight chance for showers Saturday night into Sunday. Sunday will be cooler with a high of 66.
  • A young girl was home alone yesterday in Bryan County, Oklahoma when a stranger kicked in  the door of the house. This morning, the young girl is okay and the intruder is nursing a bullet wound. The 12-year-old first called her mom at work. Debra St. Clair told her daughter to get the family gun, go hide in a closet and call 911. The child did as she was told. 'What we understand right now, he was turning the doorknob when she fired through the door,' said the Bryan County Undersheriff Ken Golden. Deputies found the suspect at the end of the block, bleeding. 32-year-old Stacy Jones was treated at a hospital and is now in the Bryan County jail.
  • KRMG SCAM ALERT: If you're on Facebook a lot, you'll recognize this: A message from a friend warning that Facebook soon will no longer be free, unless you act now. Even Rick Brinkley with Tulsa's Better Business Bureau gets them from his friends. 'When I look at it, I know that they've clicked on something that has installed a virus that is now sending that to all of their friends.' Now, there's a new twist on this scam that's as old as Facebook. 'What is happening now,' says the BBB's Brinkley, 'is they're coming back with a second wave of  'join this organization, click here to sign-up to portest that you're not going to pay for Facebook and at that point it begins downloading viruses onto your computer.' He adds, that potentially is lifting private information off your computer. If you get one of these messages, the B-B-B says tell your friend and refer them to Facebook's common myths page. If you believe the message is spam, report it to Facebook. Here's the scam alert from the BBB: How the Scam Works: You spot a friend's post in your newsfeed saying that Facebook will start charging users a monthly fee. The latest version claims a new pricing structure will have different membership tiers, including a 'gold' level for $9.99 per month. However, the post says, you can avoid any fees by just sharing the message. Post it on your wall, and your 'icon will turn blue.' This color change will exempt you from the new charges. Of course, that won't happen, and neither will these new fees. The posts above are really more of an annoying hoax than an actual scam. The scam comes in when users, infuriated by the rumors, visit and/or join Facebook 'protest' groups. These pages have been known to contain viruses. Be extra careful of any links, Facebook applications or requests to download files/software on such pages. I've Found a Fake Facebook Post. What Should I Do?     Tell your friend! These posts circulate because users think they are doing their friends a favor by sharing them. Refer your friends to Facebook's common myths page for confirmation. If the message looks like spam, report it to Facebook. Check out Facebook Help Center's scam page for details.
  • The storms this weekend carry threats like large hail, damaging winds and even the potential for tornadoes. But, you are much more likely to be injured or killed by the threat that seems to get mentioned the least: lightning. On average, lightning kills 58 people a year in the U.S. and injures more than 300. 'Lightning just decided to find my umbrella.' It happened to Lynda Eubanks in 2004. She remembers a big blue flash. 'And, I remember, the hand that was holding my umbrella felt like it exploded. National Weather Service meteorologist Nicole McGavock says lightning can strike at least 10 miles ahead of a thunderstorm. McGavock says, 'No place outdoors is safe when there is lightning in the area.' So, if you can hear it, fear it. Eight years later, Lynda Eubanks still has lingering neurological effects. But, the most lasting effect is a respect for the power of lightning. 'You know, you just always have to be watching and you always have to be careful.' The National Severe Storms Laboratory offers these tips for surviving a lightning storm: While it is difficult to quantify lightning losses, it is estimated that $4-5 billion damage occurs each year. Likewise, the cost of lightning protection to safeguard critical equipment and facilities from lightning strikes during severe weather is enormous. According to the National Weather Service, during the past 30 years (1979-2008) lightning killed an average of 58 people each year. Documented injuries average about 300 per year, although undocumented injuries are likely to be much higher. Most casualties result from inappropriate behavior during thunderstorms, particularly when people are caught outdoors during recreation or organized sports. Being aware of - and following - proven lightning safety guidelines can greatly reduce the risk of injury or death. Cloud-to-ground lightning can kill and injure people by direct or indirect means. It is not known if all people are killed who are directly struck by the flash itself. The lightning current can branch off to a person from a tree, fence, pole, or other tall object. In addition, flashes may conduct their current through the ground to a person after the flash strikes a nearby tree, antenna, or other tall object. The current also may travel through power or telephone lines to a person who is in contact with electric appliances, tools, electronics, or a corded telephone. Lightning can also travel through plumbing pipes and water to a person in contact either with a plumbing fixture or a person in water, including bathtubs, pools, and the running water of a shower. Damage to the human body: Lightning affects the many electrochemical systems in the body. People struck by lightning can suffer from nerve damage, memory loss, personality change, and emotional problems. There is a national support group for lightning and electric shock survivors. An example is some single nerve cells, such as those extending from the brain to the foot, can be as long as 6 feet or more. These types of cells are most prone to lightning damage due to the instantaneous potential difference across the length of the cell as lightning begins to enter the body. The intense heat of the lightning stroke can turn sweat instantly to steam and the tremendous pressure of the steam has been known to blow people's boots, shoes, and clothing off them. In places where metal is in contact with or close proximity to the body, such as jewelry or belt buckles, burn marks are found. Likewise, burn marks are found in places where the body had been sweaty, such as the feet, underarms, and chest. The best defense is plan ahead and avoid exposure to lightning when a thunderstorm occurs. Know where safe shelter is located and leave enough time to reach safe shelter before your danger level is high. Don't be an isolated tall object, and don't be connected to anything that may be an isolated tall object.
  • It's stressful enough worrying about the safety of one family during severe storms. Imagine the stress of worrying about hundreds of children who are all scheduled to be outside when the storm hits. That's exactly the position Union High School band director Matt McCready will be in this weekend. Union is hosting the Renegade Review marching band competition at Tuttle Stadium Saturday. 21 bands are entered in the competition. The prelims start at 9am  and last all day with 12 bands advancing to finals that evening. Click here to see the schedule of bands competing at the Renegade Review. The Oklahoma Bandmasters Association is also hosting it's state 4A and 5A marching band championships at Jenks High School and the state 1A and 3A championships at Charles Page High School in Sand Springs Saturday. 51 bands are slated to perform in those competitions. Click here to see the schedule of bands competing in the OBA State Marching Band Championships. McCready is well aware of the forecast for Saturday and the weather will be his number one concern during the competition. 'The show will go on rain-or-shine,' says McCready. However, even a light shower poses risks to marching band performers. Many of the instruments set-up along the front sideline, what's called the 'front ensemble' or 'pit', rely on electricity to power amplifiers, synthesizers and other electronic keyboards, so there's the risk of shock. Plus, at points in their shows, the marching programs can reach very fast tempos. It's not uncommon for performers to be moving at speeds exceeding 210 steps (beats) per minute, sometimes backward. Rain-slickened turf can lead to falls, which in a tight formation, may lead to performers falling in rapid sequence, like dominoes. Still, in light showers, bands can make adjustments to their shows, their equipment and their apparel, which would allow them to perform. Sprinkles are one thing. Severe storms are another. The dangers of lightning, hail, heavy downpours or worse, would stop the show immediately and the stadium would be evacuated. McCready has several options. He can delay the show and wait for the severe weather to pass. If the delays are frequent or lengthy, finals could be canceled and placements determined by the bands' preliminary performances. 'Our hope,' McCready says, 'is that each band will at least get to perform once.' But, if severe storms linger, McCready would be forced to cancel the competition. 'The show is important, but not important enough to risk anyone's safety.
  • Thunderstorm chances will increase as we head toward the weekend  in Tulsa as a warm front pushes through the region and stalls near the Oklahoma and Kansas border. South of the frontal boundary, southerly winds gusting 20 to 30 mph will be possible during the day Thursday which will create very high fire danger across the region.A strong upper level storm system is expected to push into the central plains Friday night and Saturday. Thunderstorms will likely develop west of the region Friday night and move into eastern Oklahoma during the day Saturday.Strong winds aloft combined with moderate instability suggest the likelihood for severe weather along and ahead of the approaching cold front. Depending on the exact timing of the system, a more significant outbreak of severe weather could occur. Gusty southerly winds over 30 mph at the surface Saturday will again create very high fire dangers for the region.Another upper level disturbance moves into the plains for the first half of the next work week continuing the thunderstorm chances.
  • Dan Potter

     A “reformed” Texan, Dan Potter can’t stay away from Tulsa!The host of the KRMG Morning News became our news director and morning anchor back in 2008. But, in 2010, family events forced his return to Texas. Still, he never really left Tulsa. He frequently returned to KRMG to fill-in as a substitute host on the KRMG Morning News and to assist during StormCenter events. In 2011, circumstances allowed him to return to Tulsa fulltime and, in November of 2012, Dan was named host of the KRMG Morning News.For almost two decades, Dan was Texas’ most-listened-to radio news anchor. He is the recipient of dozens of honors from broadcast news organizations. The Texas Associated Press Broadcasters and the Press Club of Dallas have awarded him Best Newscast honors a total of 6 times. He was also elected to two consecutive terms as chairman of the Texas AP Broadcasters. In Oklahoma, Dan has been honored with multiple awards from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, including two awards for Best Newscast. And, in 2013, the Tulsa Press Club awarded The KRMG Morning News top honors for Favorite NewsTalk Morning Show while Dan was recognized for the Favorite Radio NewsTalk Personality.Dan earned the national Edward R. Murrow Awardfor best large-market radio newscast from the Radio-Television News Directors Association in 2000. He was also part of the reporting team which won broadcast journalism’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, the DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton, in 2003-2004.In his radio journalism career, Dan has witnessed history. He anchored continuous coverage of the 9-11 attacks, Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and others, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Branch Davidian siege and the demise of the space shuttle Columbia over North Texas. He also reported live from the inauguration of President George W. Bush in 2001. He’s interviewed everyone from presidential candidates to Senators, from the First Lady to chefs and celebrities.Away from the studio and kitchen, Dan is celebrity in the world of competitive marching bands and world class drum corps as a stadium announcer and media personality for Drum Corps International and Bands of America.

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  • The state of Arkansas plans to conduct a double execution on Monday. Two condemned killers who admit they're guilty but fear poor health could lead to extreme pain during lethal injections might become the first inmates put to death in a double execution in the U.S. in more than 16 years. Jack Jones (pictured, left) and Marcel Williams are set to die Monday night. If put to death, they would be the second and third Arkansas inmates executed this month. Arkansas originally wanted to execute eight inmates before one of its lethal injection drugs expires at the end of the month in the nation's most aggressive execution schedule since the U.S. Supreme Court restored the death penalty in 1976. Arkansas put Ledell Lee to death last week in its first execution since 2005. Another inmate, Kenneth Williams, is set for execution Thursday.
  • Saturday, funeral services were held in Tulsa, for Oklahoma State Rep. David Brumbaugh. He passed away last weekend due to an apparent heart attack. Friends, family and colleagues had nothing but good things to say about Brumbaugh. “Every time that he spoke, he did it not because of what he thought politically, but because it’s what he thought was right,” one colleague said.  “Hopefully, those of us that are still there will be able to follow that.” The service was held at Tulsa Bible Church.  During the service, Brumbaugh was remembered as a man dedicated to public service and to his faith.
  • A cashier is said to be in stable condition, after getting shot during an armed robbery Friday night. The shooting happened around 7:29 p.m., at the RK Food Mart on North Utica Avenue. “After the cashier cooperated and handed over an undisclosed amount of cash, the suspect shot him in the foot one time,” Tulsa police said.  “The victim was transported to a local hospital for treatment.” A description of the suspect hasn’t been released.   Anyone with information regarding the robbery is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.
  • The heavens opened up in and around the Tulsa area on Friday, but how much rain did we actually get? National Weather Service Meteorologist Robert Darby has the answer. “We did see wide-spread 3 to 4 inches across a large portion of northeast Oklahoma and Tulsa County,” Darby said.   There is a chance of rain in the forecast for Saturday as well.   Sapulpa suffered some damage in Friday’s storms.   While driving around, we found uprooted trees, a destroyed gazebo and one resident received quite the surprise when he woke up. “Getting my dogs ready to go outside and kind of noticed I had no roof towards the bathroom area,” the resident said.   Crews were out helping with the debris around the city.
  • United Airlines is apparently trying to make the 'bumping' process a little less confrontational. A United passenger tells People magazine that when he was checking in for his flight on the airline's website, a pop-up screen asked him if he would be interested in taking a different flight in exchange for a travel certificate of at least $200. A United spokesman says they've done it for years, but the passenger said he didn't see it on the United check-in he did a few days before. Whether it’s new or not, the airline is taking other steps to try to avoid the ugly situation where Dr. David Dao was dragged down the aisle of a plane. United also now has a rule in place that passengers cannot be bumped if they're already seated on their flight. You can read more about the story here.