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Entertainment
Bacon deodorant newest pork-powered product from quirky Seattle company
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Bacon deodorant newest pork-powered product from quirky Seattle company

Bacon deodorant newest pork-powered product from quirky Seattle company

Bacon deodorant newest pork-powered product from quirky Seattle company

I say “bacon deodorant,” and you say, “Huh?”

Yup, a Seattle-based company is helping you take your bacon-loving-lifestyle to new heights with the launch of "Power Bacon," a bacon-scented deodorant.

J&D’s Foods in Seattle started in 2007 when two bacon-loving-fanatics got together over a beer (or maybe five or six) and decided that “everything should taste like bacon.”  Duh, why didn’t we all think of that?

The first product they launched was bacon-flavored seasoning salt, a zero calorie, zero fat, low sodium seasoning that makes everything taste like bacon. Immediately, people began sprinkling eggs, popcorn, chicken, leafy greens, everything … with their product.

When I first met local bacontrepreneurs Justin Esch and Dave Lefkow of J&D’s Foods in 2010, all I knew was that I had been assigned to shoot a video about some “local dudes” who had created “a Kevin Bacon head out of bacon.” Ehhhhhh?

They invited me to J&D’s headquarters south of downtown Seattle to meet face-to-face with their life size Kevin Bacon head. Lefkow would tell me at the time, “Kevin Bacon has earned this. He deserves to be enshrined in bacon.”

Fast forward four bacon-filled years and J&D’s Foods has been on Oprah, The Daily Show, CNN, NY Times, the SeattleInsider page on KIROtv.com and has captured over two billion press impressions for their bacon efforts.

Since creating the business in 2007, J&D’s Foods has launched BaconPop, Baconnaise, Bacon Lip Balm, BaconLube, Bacon Sunscreen, Bacon Croutons – hell, they’ve even created a Bacon Coffin for those who simply, love bacon to death.

This year, the item that will make your stocking dance for the holidays is Bacon Deodorant.  The product goes on sale Nov. 7 and is available to anyone looking to add a little spice to their underarms.

“We realize that everyone loves bacon,” Esch said. “Well, now everyone can smell like it 24 hours a day.”

Click here to watch video of a local radio show blindfolding their co-worker and putting him through a sniff-test of the bacon deodorant.

To purchase a stick of Bacon Deodorant for yourself or a meat-loving friend, visit, www.powerbacon.com.

Story produced by KIRO-TV's SeattleInsider, Michael Fox

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