ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
69°
Showers
H 78° L 65°
  • cloudy-day
    69°
    Current Conditions
    Showers. H 78° L 65°
  • rain-day
    77°
    Afternoon
    Showers. H 78° L 65°
  • rain-day
    74°
    Evening
    Few Showers. H 78° L 65°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

 

Ten Memorable Viral Videos of 2012

Here are 10 videos that were shared more than most others this year.

 

 

No. 10: A surprising opera performance that shocked Simon Cowell

 

 

PREV   Intro   10   9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1   NEXT
  • A move by Republicans to quickly pass a GOP-designed package of tax relief for those hit by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria was rejected by the House on Monday evening, when the bill failed to get a two-thirds vote for fast-track approval, as a small group of Republicans joined with most Democrats to vote against the plan, amid complaints of what was in – and not in – the measure. The vote was 245-171 – a majority – but less than the two-thirds needed for expedited approval under a process that is normally reserved for non-controversial legislation. “There are people out there who need the help,” said Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-FL), who pleaded with lawmakers to approve the aid package, telling stories of the devastation in his district, which includes the Florida Keys. “It’s been a tough couple of weeks in my community,” Curbelo said on the House floor. 245-171: House defeated FAA funding extension past 9/30 & hurricane tax relief bill. Fell 33 short of 2/3rds needed to pass. 163Ds voted No. pic.twitter.com/6azGdHZhsy — Craig Caplan (@CraigCaplan) September 25, 2017 Democrats argued the plan didn’t do enough to help those in need, especially with fresh reports of the extensive damage in Puerto Rico, which was hit last week by Hurricane Maria. “We are coming up short on our responsibility,” said Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA), who labeled the tax aid plan, “anemic.” “We should be sitting down here in the next 48 hours and putting together a massive package of relief,” Neal added. Democrats also pointed out that the tax relief would be available only for recent hurricanes, and not for victims of Hurricane Sandy, opening an old wound in the halls of Congress, where Democrats feel like victims of that disaster were denied quick help by GOP lawmakers in the Congress. “Front page of the papers in New Jersey today, people are still not back in their homes from Hurricane Sandy in 2013,” said Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-NJ), who complained that Republicans had taken tax relief provisions out of a bill he had authored – which was targeted for Sandy victims – and used them in the GOP measure to help those hit by Harvey, Irma and Maria. My heart goes out to those hit by Harvey, Irma & Maria. But we can't exclude Sandy victims in Disaster Tax Relief. https://t.co/IV4oV3MKLE — Bill Pascrell, Jr. (@BillPascrell) September 25, 2017 While most Democrats were against the plan, 26 Democrats voted for the bill, which combined disaster tax relief with provisions to extend the authorization for the Federal Aviation Administration, and separate sections to spur the creation of a private market for federal flood insurance. Those extra flood insurance provisions though created opposition in both parties. “I don’t understand how the program is going to have the resources to pay the claims,” said Rep. Garret Graves (R-LA), an expert on hurricane prep and flood insurance, as he said these new provisions spurring a private market “undermines” the existing federal flood insurance program. Republican leaders in the House have several options on this bill – they can consult with Democrats and find a bipartisan deal, or they can keep the provisions the same, and bring the bill up under regular order, and pass it later this week with a simple majority. The House vote to stop the tax relief package for hurricane victims came amid growing rumblings of concern in the Congress about the level of aid being offered to several million Americans who live on the island of Puerto Rico. “A territory of 3.5 million American citizens is almost completely without power, water, food, and telephone service, and we have a handful of helicopters involved in DOD’s response,” said Rep. Adam Smith (D-WA) of the U.S. military response to the disaster. “It’s a disgrace,” Smith added. Now, our most time-sensitive legislative task is helping the millions of Americans in Puerto Rico, full stop. — Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) September 25, 2017 At the White House, officials turned aside talk that the administration response has been less than needed. “We’ve done unprecedented movement in terms of federal funding to provide for the people of Puerto Rico and others that have been impacted [by] these storms,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.
  • As GOP Senators struggled to find enough support for the latest Republican plan to overhaul the Obama health law, dozens of demonstrators were arrested Monday after disrupting a U.S. Senate hearing on the Graham-Cassidy proposal, as the clock ticked to a September 30 deadline for action under special expedited budget procedures in Congress. “I’m here because Obamacare is a disaster in my state,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who for now is still a few votes short on his plan to change the way the Obama health law works, by sending money directly to the states, allowing them to best figure out how to cover those who need health coverage. “No cuts to Medicaid; save our liberty,” chanted protesters at the Senate Finance Committee, some of whom were in wheelchairs, as they were taken outside for processing by police. Outside Dirksen, they have a long line of people being arrested and processed. pic.twitter.com/lDSZqJIHYE — Matt Fuller (@MEPFuller) September 25, 2017 At the hearing – the only one scheduled on the Graham-Cassidy bill, which was still being changed on Monday morning – Democrats again zeroed in on how the GOP health bill would impact those Americans with pre-existing medical conditions. “It doesn’t protect them,” testified Dick Woodruff, a top official with the American Cancer Society. “It basically makes the patient protections that were enacted into law with the Affordable Care Act discretionary on the part of each state,” Woodruff added, contradicting the explanation from Republican supporters. Democrats complained that Republicans were trying to jam a bill through Congress that had not been fully vetted – and was still being tweaked. “We got a third version last night at 7:30,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), “and we got a fourth version last night at 7:50, and then we got a fifth version at 9:23 in the morning.” Important part of tense Wyden-Cassidy exchange: Wyden asked if insurers can raise rates when someone gets sick. Cassidy wouldn't answer. — Chad Bolt (@chadderr) September 25, 2017 But as the Senate convened on Monday, it still wasn’t clear when the Senate might vote on the plan this week, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell publicly thanked GOP lawmakers who have worked on health care. “If Obamacare’s failure has shown us anything, it’s that we need new ideas and a better approach,” McConnell said. But the Senate GOP leader was silent – for now – on when a vote on a GOP plan might take place.
  • Most of us probably don’t know what any of those codes mean on your boarding pass, but there’s one that you won’t want to see when you’re flying. It’s a simple series of repeated letters, SSSS, and it means that you’ll be subject to additional screenings. >> Read more trending news The SSSS is an acronym for Secondary Security Screening Selection. You and your luggage will be subject to a closer screening. You will be patted down, swabbed for explosive residue and your luggage will be opened and searched, News.com.au reported. You may have to provide extra information to prove who you are and give complete travel plans in detail to screeners. SSSS was developed by the Transportation Security Administration after 9/11 to prevent those who shouldn’t get into the U.S. from traveling here.  “Secure Flight is a risk-based passenger prescreening program that enhances security by identifying low and high-risk passengers before they arrive at the airport by matching their names against trusted traveler lists and watchlists,” TSA officials told Business Insider. The list that feeds the SSSS code is a secret. The TSA said that people are added to it after a computer randomly selects travelers. One clue that could mean that you may be on the list is if you can’t use online check-in for a flight, News.com.au reported.
  • Looking for ways to deal with hundreds of thousands of younger illegal immigrants who were brought to the United States by their parents, a group of Republican Senators introduced a plan on Monday which would let those “Dreamers” remain in the U.S. legally, but wait up to fifteen years in line with others who are seeking American citizenship. “This is not an amnesty bill where we take those individuals and just say, we’re going to give you a quick route to citizenship, and ignore the realities of what happened coming in,” said Sen. James Lankford (R-OK). “They were children, many of them were two or three years old when they came,” Lankford told a news conference at the Capitol. “They’ve grown up in this country, they know no other place.” Sen. Tillis and Sen. Lankford introducing “succeed act”- bill offers merit-based pathway for dreamers to stay in the US pic.twitter.com/NSkU0aGGEu — Dorey Scheimer (@DoreyScheimer) September 25, 2017 The plan from Lankford, Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC), and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), would not allow “Dreamers” to bring in relatives during that 15 year wait for possible citizenship – as critics worry it will mean ‘chain migration’ once those younger illegal immigrants are allowed to stay in the U.S. legally. Lankford made clear this bill to deal with the “DACA” children should not be considered on its own, but only as part of a broader Congressional deal on immigration matters. “This individual piece is not designed to be a stand-alone,” Lankford said, rattling off issues like border security, programs to stop companies from hiring illegal immigrants, and cracking down on people who enter the country legally, but then stay longer than their visa allows them to be in the U.S.
  • U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact. Today, health care is based on averages, what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients. The massive “All of Us” project instead will push what’s called precision medicine, using traits that make us unique to forecast health and treat disease. The goal is to end cookie-cutter health care. A pilot is under way now. If all goes well, the National Institutes of Health plans to open enrollment early next year. Participants will get DNA tests, and report on their diet, sleep, exercise and numerous other health-affecting factors. It’s a commitment: The study aims to run for at least 10 years.