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    Despite entering the Pyeongchang Olympics as world champions and the favorites to win gold, Canada's women's curling team has been eliminated from medal contention after a shocking loss to Britain. It's an unwanted first for Rachel Homan and her teammates. No Canadian team has ever left the Olympics without a medal in men's or women's curling since the sport was reintroduced to the Winter Games in 1998. 'They played really well — they put the rocks in the right spots and we really didn't,' Homan, Canada's 'skip,' or captain, said after the stunning 6-5 defeat. 'Obviously, (we're) a little bit disappointed. We wanted to try to qualify and make the playoffs for Canada, but we gave it all we had. We never gave up and that's the way it goes sometimes. It's sport.' Canada entered the final end, or period, of the match up 5-4, but the British team had an advantage known as the hammer, which means they were allowed to throw the final rock. The Brits quickly crowded the center of the target, known as the house, with stones. Homan tried to remove the rocks by throwing a fast-moving stone. But she didn't quite nail the shot, leaving two Canadian stones close to the center of the house. Homan then faced a difficult final shot, which had to make its way around a cluster of rocks to the bullseye. It came up short of the target. And it was games over for Holman's team. Canada's uneven performance during the Games rocked the curling world, particularly Canadians who are by far the most feverish curling fans on the planet. The Canadian spectators at the Gangneung Curling Centre, normally the second-rowdiest bunch in the arena next to the hometown crowd of Koreans, fell unusually silent as the players reached over to shake their opponents' hands in gracious defeat. The Canadians were struggling to keep up from the start of the games, losing their first three matches and falling to last place. They managed to rally back to the middle of the pack, but faced fierce competition from the rest of the teams. Though Canada has long dominated the sport, the strong performance from other countries at Pyeongchang has proven that curling is no longer entirely Canada's domain. The Korean women's team, considered a longshot to reach the medal round, is now in first place. 'Especially on the women's side, every single team that was here earned the right to be here and are all amazing,' Canada's Lisa Weagle said. Though the pressure their homeland heaped on them to get the gold was intense, the curlers denied they'd let the lofty expectations rattle them, saying they stopped going on social media and reading articles about themselves after arriving in Pyeongchang. 'They are way harder on themselves than anyone else is,' coach Adam Kingsbury said. 'I'm well aware of the pressure that's being placed on them, but they're in a bubble. So any time they're in a competition, that pressure and that intensity and that fire you see — that comes from within.' The women still have another round of matches later Wednesday to determine who heads into the semifinals. Sweden is currently sitting in second place, followed by Britain. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Suddenly short-handed, the Philadelphia Flyers aren't going to let a few injuries stop them. Jakub Voracek scored the tying goal with 1:25 left in regulation and then got the game-winner 1:26 into overtime to lift the Flyers to a 3-2 victory over the Montreal Canadiens on Tuesday night. Voracek also had an assist and Nolan Patrick had the other goal for Philadelphia, which improved to 7-0-2 in its last nine games. The Flyers, third in the Metropolitan Division, pulled two points behind second-place Pittsburgh and three behind first-place Washington. 'That's a nice way to get two points,' Philadelphia coach Dave Hakstol said. It's even better, perhaps, considering the state of the Flyers. The Flyers were without forward Wayne Simmonds, who will be out for 2-to-3 weeks after suffering an upper-body injury in Sunday's win over the New York Rangers. Simmonds joins a growing list of injured Flyers. Starting goalie Brian Elliott had surgery Feb. 13 for a core muscle injury and is expected to miss up to five more weeks. Backup Michal Neuvirth, who was elevated to No. 1 last Tuesday after Elliott's injury, will be sidelined 4-to-6 weeks after suffering a lower body injury in Sunday's game. 'You just have to dig in,' Voracek said. 'We have to find a way to win games. We've got to keep finding a way.' Philadelphia acquired goalie Petr Mrazek from Detroit on Monday night for a pair of draft picks to fill the void. Mrazek backed up Alex Lyon on Tuesday. Lyon, appearing in his fifth career game, made 25 saves for his second victory. 'He took care of business and was a big part of us winning a hockey game,' Hakstol said of Lyon. 'We're going to need contributions from everybody in our lineup.' Oskar Lindblom replaced Simmonds, who has 20 goals and 37 points, and didn't register a point in his NHL debut. 'Those are big shoes to fill, but I don't think anybody spends too much time thinking about the injuries or who's out of the lineup,' Hakstol said. Paul Byron and Jeff Petry scored for Montreal, which lost its sixth straight. The Canadiens' NHL-worst road record fell to 8-19-2. With Lyon pulled for an extra attacker, Voracek sent the game to overtime with a slap shot from the point that deflected off Montreal's Max Pacioretty and through goalie Carey Price's five-hole. 'It's not ideal, that's for sure,' Price said of giving up the late tying goal. 'Pretty good game up to that point. That pretty much sums it up, really.' Voracek netted the game-winner when he skated to the slot and fired a wrist shot past Price's glove side. 'We would have liked to prove something on the road, but we weren't able to,' Pacioretty said. 'We were close tonight and it goes off my stick and goes in for the tie, so it's tough.' Price played in his 552nd game for the Canadiens to move past Patrick Roy for second all-time in games played among Montreal goalies. Jacques Plante tops the list with 556. Byron scored his 14th of the season after a pretty assist from Tomas Plekanec with 11:15 left in the third period to put Montreal up 2-1. Petry opened the scoring with 2:13 left in the first period when he deflected Karl Alzner's shot from the point past Lyon. The Flyers tied it on the power play 7:18 into the second period when Patrick, replacing Simmonds on Philadelphia's top extra-man unit, one-timed Claude Giroux's pass from the slot past Price's glove side. NOTES: Montreal C Phillip Danault returned for the first time since suffering a concussion on Jan. 13. ... The teams wrap up their season series Feb. 26 at Montreal. ... LW Nicolas Deslauriers, who signed a two-year contract extension on Monday, won a one-sided fight with Brandon Manning in the second period. ... The Flyers have not played short-handed in three straight games, becoming the first team to do so since the league started keeping power-play and penalty-kill stats in the 1977-78 season. ... Flyers C Travis Konecny struggled to get through the game after blocking a shot with his skate with 5:02 left in the first period. UP NEXT Canadiens: Host the New York Rangers on Thursday night to open a four-game homestand. Flyers: Host Columbus on Thursday night.
  • Miles Bridges grabbed the Big Ten trophy, lifted it and flashed an ear-to-ear grin. Bridges scored 19 points, leading No. 2 Michigan State to an 81-61 win over Illinois on Tuesday night to seal a share of the Big Ten championship. The Spartans (27-3, 15-2 Big Ten) have won 11 straight and can claim the conference title outright if they win at Wisconsin on Sunday. Bridges turned down a chance to make millions in the NBA this season to be a college sophomore in part to chase championships, and now he has one. 'That's why I came back,' he said. 'Memories that will last a lifetime.' It is clear, though, he's not satisfied with a Big Ten title. 'We're not done yet,' Bridges told the Breslin Center crowd after the game. Coach Tom Izzo, likewise, isn't content with winning his eighth Big Ten title. 'It's one of those years, I'm not satisfied with that one,' Izzo said. The Fighting Illini (13-16, 3-13) were coming off a win over Nebraska and looked like they were building momentum, competing well enough to trail the Spartans by just three points at halftime. Michigan State dashed their hopes of pulling off an upset by opening the second half with a 12-1 run to take control and went on to build 20-plus-point leads. 'They don't have any weaknesses,' Illinois coach Brad Underwood said. 'I think they're really capable of winning the whole thing.' The cushion allowed Izzo to put his three seniors in and out of the game in the final minutes. That gave each of them an opportunity to kiss the school's logo at midcourt and get an ovation from the crowd, following a tradition Shawn Respert started in 1995 during Izzo's final season as an assistant under Jud Heathcote. It was a feel-good night on a campus still reeling because of a crisis over how the school handled allegations against disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar . An ESPN report has also stirred Michigan State's basketball and football programs by questioning how Izzo and Mark Dantonio have dealt with allegations against their players. 'I hope you enjoyed this team and I hope they brought a little bit of a bright light,' Izzo said to fans during a postgame ceremony that included raising a Big Ten title banner. Joshua Langford had 16 points, Cassius Winston scored 12 and Jaren Jackson had eight points and five blocks for the Spartans. Illinois' Leron Black scored 20 points and Trent Frazier had 14 points on 4-of-13 shooting. BIG PICTURE Illinois: The young team has experienced growing pains that may serve the program well next season, when it returns almost every player on the roster. 'We're growing every day,' Underwood said. 'We have one senior. We have two scholarships open so we could grow the program with the addition of some recruits. We signed what we think is an elite point guard (Ayo Dosunmu), one of the best in the country.' Michigan State: Despite clinching a share of the conference championship, the Spartans have a lot to play for with an outright title at stake against the Badgers and a chance to improve their seeding for the NCAA Tournament. SENIOR START Izzo started Tum Tum Nairn, Gavin Schilling and Ben Carter in place of Winston, Jackson and Nick Ward. The coach said it was Winston's idea. EFFICIENT PLAY Michigan State's Kenny Goins scored a season-high nine points In 17 minutes. Ward had eight points, seven rebounds and two blocks in just 15 minutes. UP NEXT Illinois: Hosts Purdue on Thursday night and on Sunday plays at Rutgers, where the Illini will have their last chance to win a road game this season. Michigan State: Wraps up the regular season at home against Wisconsin on Sunday, shooting for its first outright title since 2009 and aiming to improve its postseason seeding. 'We have other things to accomplish,' Izzo said. ___ More AP college basketball: https://collegebasketball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ Follow Larry Lage on Twitter at https://twitter.com/larrylage
  • Lindsey Vonn cast a quick glance toward the sky after finishing what was likely her final Olympic downhill run, shrugged her shoulders after seeing her time and shook a friendly index finger at her good friend. No one could catch Sofia Goggia of Italy. Goggia won the women's downhill Wednesday at Jeongseon Alpine Center and Vonn earned bronze. The American was looking at a higher finish before Ragnhild Mowinckel of Norway turned in a surprise silver-medal performance as the 19th racer on the course. Then again, shocking finishes seem to be the norm on this hill. Ester Ledecka of Czech Republic made a late charge last week from back in the pack to take the super-G title. She skipped the downhill to step back into the snowboarding realm and will go through qualifying Thursday in the parallel giant slalom. Goggia finished in a time of 1 minute, 39.22 seconds to hold off Mowinckel by 0.09 seconds. Vonn was 0.47 seconds behind Goggia. 'I gave it all today, skied a great race,' Vonn said. 'Sofia just skied better than I did.' At 33, Vonn becomes the oldest female medalist in Alpine skiing at the Winter Games. The record was held by Austria's Michaela Dorfmeister, who was just shy of her 33rd birthday when she won the downhill and the super-G at the 2006 Turin Olympics. 'I wish I could keep going. I have so much fun. I love what I do,' Vonn said. 'My body just can't, probably can't, take another four years.' Vonn captured the downhill gold at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, but didn't get a chance to defend it four years later when she sat out the Sochi Games after tearing ligaments in her right knee. In a way, this was her 'defense.' 'If you think what's happened over the last eight years and what I've been through to get here, I gave it all and to come away with a medal is a dream come true,' Vonn said. 'You've got to put things into perspective. Of course, I'd have loved a gold medal but, honestly, this is amazing and I'm so proud.' This particular track suits Goggia's aggressive skiing. She also edged Vonn in March to win the only World Cup downhill contested on the hill. Maybe mind games. Maybe a ploy. But each pointed to the other as the one to watch in the days leading up to the race. Goggia referred to Vonn as 'definitely the favorite.' Goggia was behind at the top, but found another speed near the bottom. Vonn couldn't match it when she raced two spots later. This was Goggia's first gold at an Olympics or a world championships. She has four World Cup wins — two of them at this venue. 'I still don't realize I'm first,' Goggia said. 'I was really focused. I moved like a Samurai. Usually, I'm really chaotic but I wanted to take in every little detail, every particular in the morning. I believed in myself — and then what counts, counts.' Goggia and Vonn have struck up a friend over the years, with Goggia recently visiting Vonn at her home in Colorado. They bonded over their love of dogs — and ski racing. 'Lindsey is a great skier, the greatest skier, a great person and a great woman,' Goggia said. 'It's always an honor to take part in the same race as her. It's fun, too. Afterward, we're friends. We'll go for a coffee together, talk about our work. It's good for our sport.' Vonn has dedicated these Olympics to her grandfather , Don Kildow, who died in November. She wears his initials 'DK' on the side of her helmet as a tribute. 'It's been really hard for me not to get emotional for so many reasons, especially because of my grandfather,' Vonn said. 'I wanted to win so much because of him, but I still think I made him proud.' Mikaela Shiffrin didn't race downhill because of the altered Olympic program. When the Alpine combined was moved a day forward to Thursday, Shiffrin elected to skip the downhill race rather than compete in back-to-back days. So now Shiffrin and Vonn will meet for the first time in an Olympics race during the last individual women's event. The combined adds the times of a downhill __advantage, Vonn — and one run of slalom — big advantage, Shiffrin. Both are not planning to participate in the team event on Saturday to close out the Alpine skiing program. On her Twitter account, Shiffrin said: 'This. Track. Is. So. Fun! Only slightly bummed I'm not skiing it today cause we have 4 girls who are ready to hammer down and I can't wait to watch!' It's been a memorable Olympics for Mowinckel, who also finished with the silver medal in the giant slalom. American Alice McKennis finished fifth. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • The plan was simple: Score early against a weary opponent and ride the momentum the rest of the way. The Tampa Bay Lightning carried out the strategy perfectly, turning a big first period into a huge 4-2 victory over the Washington Capitals on Tuesday night in a showdown between division leaders in the Eastern Conference. Washington had played in Buffalo one day earlier, and that played significantly into the game-plan of Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper. 'The big thing for us is, we knew they played (Monday). The key for that is you've got to get the lead,' Cooper said. Brayden Point sandwiched two goals around a tally by Chris Kunitz to make it 3-0 after the first period. That proved to be enough of a cushion for goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy, who stopped 35 shots to earn his NHL-leading 35th win. 'A good first period, and then we kind of hung on,' Point said. After Alex Ovechkin notched his NHL-high 36th goal for Washington to make it 3-2 at 11:02 of the third, Nikita Kucherov clinched it with a breakaway goal with 7:02 remaining. The victory improved Tampa Bay's NHL-best record to 40-17-3 and kept the Lightning ahead of surging Boston in the Atlantic Division and the Eastern Conference. 'I liked a lot what happened in the first period. I thought we deserved to have a 3-0 lead,' Cooper said. 'There are a lot of positives to take out of the game, especially the fact that we got two points.' Lars Eller scored a power-play goal for the Capitals, who lead Pittsburgh by one point in the Metropolitan Division. Coach Barry Trotz was encouraged by his team's play over the last 40 minutes, but lamented Washington's miscues in the early-going. 'We made three mistakes and they got all three of them,' Trotz said. 'They didn't have very many shots ... but they had three goals and we dug ourselves a hole.' Seeking to end a five-game losing streak in Washington, Tampa Bay took control early behind Point, a 21-year-old playing in his second NHL season. After Point beat Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby with a power-play goal at 2:30, Kunitz scored on a deflection at 16:00 before Point split two defenders and delivered a backhander for his 23rd goal of the season at 17:52. 'That's how we wanted to start off the game,' Lightning defenseman Victor Hedman said. It was the fifth career two-goal game for Point, who's still seeking his first hat trick. 'You think about it for sure, but the win is the most important thing,' he said. The All-Star center did, however, extend his point-scoring streak to five games. Eller scored his 12th goal of the season at 9:32 of the second period, but Vasilevskiy stiffened after that. 'The goaltenders in this league are erasers,' Trotz said. 'Tonight, their eraser was really good, and so we take the loss.' NOTES: Kucherov leads Tampa Bay with 32 goals and 78 points. ... One day after being obtained in trade with Chicago, Capitals D Michal Kempny participated in pre-game warmups but was scratched. ... Holtby fell to 9-3-2 lifetime against Tampa Bay. ... The Lightning won the season series 2-1. ... Ovechkin is now six goals short of 600 for his career. He's scored 43 against Tampa Bay in 65 games. ... Washington fell to 20-9-2 at home but had its 395th consecutive sellout. UP NEXT Lightning: At Ottawa on Thursday night, the second of three straight road games. Capitals: At Florida on Thursday night. Series tied 1-1, with each team winning on road. ___ More NHL hockey: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey
  • The Miami Dolphins decided receiver Jarvis Landry is worth any headaches he causes, even if the cost is $16 million. Landry was given a non-exclusive franchise tag Tuesday after leading the NFL with 112 catches in 2017. The move by the Dolphins came on the first day that teams could assign franchise tags. The tag's value is expected to be about $16 million. Landry made $894,000 last season. Landry has said he wanted to remain with the Dolphins, and they said they wanted him back. But his volatile personality has been cause for a concern — especially on a team that went 6-10 last year in part because of poor discipline. Landry was ejected in the fourth quarter of the season finale, a loss to Buffalo, and coach Adam Gase said the episode was embarrassing and 'extremely bad.' But Landry was by far the highest-profile Dolphins player eligible for free agency, and perhaps the best player on an offense that sputtered throughout 2017. Miami still hopes to sign Landry to a multi-year deal, a person familiar with the team's plans said. The person didn't want to be identified because the Dolphins haven't publicly discussed contract negotiations with Landry. Landry had a franchise-record 112 catches and a career-high nine touchdowns in 2017, the final season of the contract he signed before his rookie season. He has been selected to three consecutive Pro Bowls and has 400 career receptions, a record for a fourth-year player. The non-exclusive tag allows Landry to sign an offer sheet with another team. The Dolphins could match that offer, and if Landry leaves, they would receive two first-round picks from his new team. Miami also could withdraw the tag. ___ More AP NFL: http://pro32.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL ___ Follow Steven Wine on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Steve_Wine
  • Andrew Luck delivered some good news to Indianapolis Colts fans on Tuesday. He feels better. He ruled out additional surgery. And he's eager to play football after spending the last 13 months rehabbing from shoulder surgery. If all goes well, the three-time Pro Bowl quarterback might even return in time for the start of April's offseason workouts. Colts season-ticket holders couldn't have asked for a better town hall meeting. 'That is not an option for me,' Luck said when Sports Illustrated reporter Peter King asked during a pre-taped interview if he might need more surgery. 'Right now, that ship has sailed in my mind, which is also a bit of a relief. I'm not going to lie.' The answer drew loud applause from a nearly packed house. Still, skepticism is understandable after the turns and twists of last season. Luck had surgery for a partially torn labrum in January 2017. He, general manager Chris Ballard and then coach Chuck Pagano all spent months optimistically talking about Luck's long-awaited return, only to watch the process continue to drag on. Team owner Jim Irsay joined the chorus in August, suggesting Luck would return to game action in September. But things didn't work out as anticipated. Instead, the top overall draft pick in 2012 missed all of Indy's offseason workouts, all of training camp and all of the preseason. After sitting out the first month of the regular season, Luck finally started throwing a football. Two weeks later, team officials shut him down after he complained of lingering soreness. He spent the next few weeks seeking opinions about a second surgery before going on season-ending injured reserve in November. Luck then headed to Europe, where he continued rehabbing until returning to the team complex days before last season's finale. He hadn't spoken publicly about the shoulder since Dec. 29, so the fact he's talking now could be a promising sign even though a throwing timeline remains unclear. 'I'm in the middle of a little bit of throwing,' Luck explained without saying whether he was using a football or another object. 'But I'm really preparing and strengthening the shoulder to handle the throwing load of an NFL quarterback, to make sure the shoulder can handle it.' A healthy Luck, the No. 3 pick in the upcoming draft and tens of millions of dollars in salary-cap space presumably could have made Indy's coaching vacancy the most attractive opening this offseason. Initially, it appeared the Colts may have gotten the most highly coveted candidate when New England offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels agreed to take the job. Eight hours later, he called back to say no despite already having hired three assistants. So last week, the Colts went with their next best option — Super Bowl-winning offensive coordinator Frank Reich of Philadelphia. While some around the league were mystified by what happened and others, including Ballard, were upset, fans embraced Ballard's second choice. When King, the event moderator, asked Reich if he appreciated McDaniels backing out, one fan shouted: 'We are.' 'That's very kind,' Reich said. If Luck's recovery lingers again, this time the Colts should be in better shape. Jacoby Brissett, a player Reich said he liked coming out of college, started 15 games for Indy after being acquired in a trade on cut-down weekend. Still, the Colts know with a lot of Luck, they could go from 4-12 to playoff contender. Reich just wants to make sure his franchise quarterback is healthy first. 'You don't want to say 'How you doing, how you doing, how you doing?' every day. I mean, who wants that?' Reich said. 'I'm hopeful that (his return), maybe that can happen (by OTAs). I'm hopeful, yeah. I know it sounds odd, but I'm not demanding an answer on that. I'm not. The question, to me, is, is he ready? I hope he's there, but we'll see.' ___ More AP NFL: https://pro32.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • The Arizona Diamondbacks sent infielder Brandon Drury to the New York Yankees and received outfielder Steven Souza Jr. from the Tampa Bay Rays in a three-team trade Tuesday that included five players plus two to be named later. The deal was announced one day after former Diamondbacks slugger J.D. Martinez agreed to a $110 million, five-year contract with Boston, pending a physical. Arizona has moved quickly to fill that hole in the outfield, signing speedy Jarrod Dyson to a $7.5 million, two-year contract on Monday before trading for Souza. Souza will be the starter at one corner outfield position, with Dyson subbing at all three spots. Drury gives the Yankees a new option at third base or second base, where New York was projected to start a pair of rookies. Top pitching prospect Anthony Banda goes from Arizona to the Rays, who also get minor league second baseman Nick Solak from the Yankees and two players to be named from the Diamondbacks. Minor league right-hander Taylor Widener moves from New York to Arizona. Drury played mostly second base for Arizona but came up through the minors as a third baseman and could fill that spot for the Yankees, who have top prospect Gleyber Torres penciled in at second. Another prospect, Miguel Andujar, was a leading candidate at third. New York traded All-Star second baseman Starlin Castro to Miami this offseason in the blockbuster deal for slugger Giancarlo Stanton. Chase Headley was sent to San Diego in a cost-cutting swap, and fellow third baseman Todd Frazier signed with the crosstown Mets as a free agent. The 25-year-old Drury also has experience in the corner outfield spots, but the Yankees are well stocked there. Souza helps fill a power void in Arizona's outfield created by Martinez's departure. Martinez had 29 home runs and 65 RBIs in 62 games with Arizona last season after being acquired from Detroit, but the Diamondbacks knew it was a long shot they'd be able to afford to retain him. Drury hit .267 with 13 home runs and 63 RBIs in 135 games for Arizona last season. To make room for him on the 40-man roster, the Yankees designated outfielder Jabari Blash for assignment. Souza, 28, batted .239 with a career-high 30 home runs and 78 RBIs last year. He had a .351 on-base percentage and .810 OPS. Drury was the odd man out in a crowded middle infield for Arizona. Chris Owings or Ketel Marte could shift to second from shortstop, where Nick Ahmed also is back from injury. Daniel Descalso can play all the infield positions, plus the outfield. Drury came to Arizona from Atlanta as part of the Justin Upton trade in 2013 and worked his way up through the Diamondbacks' minor league system. He isn't eligible for arbitration until next year. Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, going 2-3 with a 5.96 ERA in eight appearances, four starts. The left-hander was 8-7 with a 5.39 ERA in 22 starts for Triple-A Reno last year. The 23-year-old Solak split last season between Class A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, batting .297 with 12 homers and 53 RBIs. Widener, 23, will be a non-roster invitee to Diamondbacks spring training. He was 7-8 with a 3.39 ERA in 21 starts for Class A Tampa last season and advanced to Double-A Trenton, where he was 1-0 with a 3.00 ERA in two relief appearances. He threw the final five innings of a no-hitter against Binghamton on Sept. 8. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • The Latest on the Pyeongchang Olympics (all times local): 2:20 p.m. Alina Zagitova allowed her close friend and training partner, Evgenia Medvedeva, to enjoy her new short program world record for about 15 minutes. The 15-year-old Russian then performed a flawless 'Black Swan' routine to score 82.92 points inside Gangneung Ice Arena. That topped the score of 81.61 that Medvedeva put up three skaters ahead of her. It was the third time the world record has been set during the Pyeongchang Games. Medvedeva also broke the record in helping the Olympic Athletes of Russia win the team silver medal. ___ 2:15 p.m. The injuries are starting to pile up in men's skicross at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Three skiers left the course on medical sleds during the first round of eliminations following scary wrecks Wednesday. Canadian Chris Del Bosco's right side slammed violently into the ground at Phoenix Snow Park after he lost control in the air over one of the final jumps in the race that sends skiers side-by-side down the mountain. France's Terence Tchiknavorian landed awkwardly after a jump and appeared to injure his right leg. Austria's Christoph Wahrstoetter became tangled up in the fence after colliding with Sweden's Erik Mobaerg. ___ 2 p.m. Figure skater Evgenia Medvedeva has broken her own short program record set earlier at the Pyeongchang Games, scoring 81.61 points to Fredric Chopin's 'Nocturn' at Gangneung Ice Arena. The two-time world champion was perfect on her jumps, though her opening triple flip-triple toe combination was a bit awkward, and effortless on her spins and step sequence. Medvedeva and her Russian teammate, Alina Zagitova, are the heavy favorites to win gold. Zagitova skates later in the final grouping. Medvedeva also holds the free skate and overall record, both set during the 2017 World Team Trophy in Japan. Her then-record short program helped the Olympic Athletes of Russia win team silver earlier this month. ___ 1:45 p.m. Surprise Olympic champion Red Gerard has logged some 18,000 miles on a post-victory tour that took him from Pyeongchang to Los Angeles to New York, and now, back to South Korea. Ten days after his victory on the slopestyle course, the American has returned to the snow, where he qualified for the final of the big air contest — the newest, highest-flying snowboarding event at the games. His agent, Ryan Runke, can barely keep up with all the phone calls. Sponsorship and media opportunities are flooding in, and the mission isn't so much about grabbing everything he can, but finding the right fit. ___ 1:15 p.m. Canada's world champion women's curling team is out of the running for an Olympic medal after suffering a shocking loss to Great Britain at the Pyeongchang Games. Canada's 6-5 loss to Britain on Wednesday in the women's round robin eliminates them from medal contention. The Canadians came into the Pyeongchang Games as the favorite to win gold, and their lackluster performance has stunned the curling world. Canada's captain, Rachel Homan, says she is disappointed in the loss but said the British team simply played better. ___ 1 p.m. Nine days after becoming the first U.S. woman and third overall to land a triple axel in the Olympics, Mirai Nagasu has taken to competitive ice again in the short program. She came down on two feet on her opening triple axel, then fell to the surface. While the rest of her program was clean, Nagasu's chances for an individual medal were damaged. She earned 66.93 points, a season's best, but not likely to put her in position for the podium. Nagasu, 24 and the fourth-place finisher at the Vancouver Games, helped the United States win a bronze medal in the team event with her historic jump and a spotless free skate. ___ 12:15 p.m. Sofia Goggia of Italy has won the women's Olympic downhill, with good friend Lindsey Vonn taking the bronze. Ragnhild Mowinckel of Norway was the surprise silver medalist after turning in a sizzling run as the 19th racer on the course. Mowinckel also earned silver in the giant slalom at these Games. Goggia finished in a time of 1 minute, 39.22 seconds to hold off Mowinckel by 0.09 seconds. Vonn finished 0.47 seconds behind Goggia. At 33, Vonn becomes the oldest female medalist in Alpine skiing at the Winter Games. The record was held by Austria's Michaela Dorfmeister, who was just shy of her 33rd birthday when she won the downhill and the super-G at the 2006 Turin Olympics. This is likely Vonn's last Olympic downhill race. ___ 12 p.m. The top four spots midway through the women's figure skating short program are held by American-born skaters representing four different countries. Bradie Tennell remains on top for the U.S. after her score of 64.01 points. She's followed by Isadora Williams for Brazil, Emmi Peltonen for Finland and Alexia Paganini for Switzerland. Williams was born in Marietta, Georgia, and grew up in suburban Washington, D.C. But her mother is from Belo Horizonte and Williams has a large family still living in Brazil. Peltonen was born in Nashville, Tennessee, while her father Ville Peltonen was playing in the NHL. Paganini was born in Connecticut to a Swiss father and holds dual U.S.-Swiss citizenship. ___ 11:50 a.m. Sofia Goggia of Italy is in first place and American Lindsey Vonn in position for the bronze medal after the top 20 racers in the downhill at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Ragnhild Mowinckel of Norway turned in a surprise second-place finish as the 19th racer on the course. The only thing that could disrupt the podium finish is a surprise showing by one of the remaining lower-ranked skiers. Nothing is guaranteed, though, especially after Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic made a late charge last week from back in the pack to take the super-G title. Ledecka, who also dabbles in snowboarding, didn't compete in the downhill. ___ 11:45 a.m. There have been some dramatic crashes in the women's downhill at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Michelle Gisin of Switzerland crossed the finish line and then crossed her skis, sending her falling to the snow. She slid a ways before getting up and waving to the crowd. Earlier in the race, Stephanie Venier of Austria crashed on the course. She went down on a hip and tumbled down the hill before coming to a stop. She got back up. Later, two Italian racers crashed — Nadia Fanchini, who fell backward after a jump, and then Federica Brignone, who wound up sliding into the fencing on the side of the course. ___ 11:20 a.m. American ski racer Lindsey Vonn has the second-fastest time so far in the women's downhill after a solid run. Vonn finished 0.47 seconds behind leader Sofia Goggia of Italy as the seventh racer to take the course at Jeongseon Alpine Center. At 33, Vonn is trying to become the oldest female medalist in Alpine skiing at the Winter Games. ___ 11 a.m. Russian women's curling coach Sergei Belano says he is convinced a Russian curler charged with doping was slipped meldonium without his knowledge. Belano says he doesn't believe Alexander Krushelnitsky would have taken the drug because it would be foolish to do so. Belano said he is certain someone must have drugged Krushelnitsky. Belano did not explicitly say who he suspects would have done such a thing, but he said that multiple housekeepers come in and out of the athletes' rooms each day. Krushelnitsky won bronze with his wife in mixed doubles, but he now is likely to be stripped of the medal. Russian curling officials have said Krushelnitsky could have been set up by a rival Russian athlete or a political enemy of the country. Meldonium is designed for people with heart problems and some believe it can help athletes increase stamina. It was banned in sports in 2016. ___ 10:40 a.m. American figure skater Bradie Tennell fell during the opening combination in her short program at the Pyeongchang Olympics, such a rare mistake that not even she can remember the last time she made it. Tennell, whose strength is her jumps, recovered to skate cleanly the rest of the way. The reigning national champion wound up with 64.01 points. As the first skater on the ice, that total should keep her in first place for quite a while. The rest of the medal contenders all skate about two hours later. 'It was definitely unexpected,' Tennell said of her fall on a triple toe loop, 'but things happen. We're all human. We all make mistakes. You just have to get up and keep going.' The starting order is determined in part by world rankings, and Tennell dealt with injuries much of last season and did not compete in the biggest events. That forced her into the opening group, and she drew the No. 1 starting spot from among those skaters ___ 10:30 a.m. Skier Mikaela Shiffrin is thinking of her American teammates even if she's not racing with them in the downhill at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Shiffrin wrote on her Twitter account: 'This. Track. Is. So. Fun! Only slightly bummed I'm not skiing it today cause we have 4 girls who are ready to hammer down and I can't wait to watch!' Shiffrin, who won Olympic gold in the giant slalom last week, decided to sit out the downhill when the Alpine combined was moved a day forward to Thursday due to weather concerns. She didn't want to race on back-to-back days, like she did with the giant slalom and slalom, where she entered as the defending champion and finished fourth. ___ 10:20 a.m. U.S. champion Bradie Tennell has taken the lead in the women's short program at the Olympics. Of course, she is the first skater to perform. Tennell drew the opening spot, not an advantageous position in a field of 30. She has been consistent throughout her breakthrough season, but this time fell on the second part of her triple lutz-triple toe loop combination. Tennell, who helped the Americans win the bronze medal in the team event, has earned 64.01 points. A score of 81.06 is the Olympic record, set last week by Russian Evgenia Medvedeva in the team competition. The other Americans, Mirai Nagasu and Karen Chen, are slated to go 20th and 22nd, respectively. Medvedeva skates 25th. ___ 9:40 a.m. The Trump administration says Vice President Mike Pence was ready to meet with representatives from North Korea during his visit to the Olympic Games in South Korea but that North Korea canceled at the last minute. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert says that Pence 'was ready to take this opportunity' and would have used the meeting to emphasize U.S. concerns about the North's nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Nauert says the U.S. regrets North Korea's 'failure to seize this opportunity.' ___ 9:30 a.m. Lindsey Vonn is set to compete in her last Olympic downhill, but she says she'd rather not focus on that right now. Vonn, the downhill gold medalist at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, is generally considered the favorite at the Pyeongchang Games. She's looked good in training runs. Also Wednesday, the women's figure-skating competition starts with the short program. Among the competitors is American Mirai Nagasu, who in the team competition became the first U.S. woman to land a triple axel. The Russians also have strong contenders, including two-time reigning world champion Evgenia Medvedeva, who broke her own short program world record in the team event. She has lost to only one skater since 2015 — her teammate Alina Zagitova. The medals will be awarded Friday. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Managers or coaches must make a pitching change if they head to the mound for the seventh time in a game under baseball's new pace of play rules. Commissioner Rob Manfred and executive Joe Torre explained some of the parameters Tuesday, one day after MLB imposed stricter limits on mound visits in an effort to speed up games. 'I don't see pace of games issues as harsh or not harsh,' Manfred said during his annual visit to the Cactus League. 'I see them as a fan friendly issue.' Torre noted that umpires will keep players from proceeding to see the pitcher if six mound visits have already occurred. 'From our perspective it's important to go back to, first, principles. On pace of game, I think the first and most important principle is that pace of game is a fan issue,' Manfred said. 'Our research tells us that it's a fan issue, our broadcast partners tell us that it's a fan issue, and the independent research that our broadcast partners do confirm with that, that it's a fan issue. 'Because it's a fan issue at the end of the day, I hope it's an issue that you will be able to find common ground with all the constituents in the game moving forward, because it is after all the fans that makes the engine known as Major League Baseball run.' MLB has the right to institute rules changes absent an agreement with one year notice and made proposals during the 2016-17 offseason for a pitch clock and more restrictions on mound visits. Giants catcher Buster Posey noted that it's the players' jobs to move forward as the game adapts, whether they like the decisions or not. 'I actually was listening to John Smoltz talk about it and I agree with what he was saying. He says as baseball players you adjust,' Posey said last week. 'No matter what it is, you adjust. I think it might affect a few people, but they'll adjust. If it affects me, I'll adjust. I don't foresee it being an issue. For me personally, baseball being my job, my job's to go out and perform with what I have. That's kind of the way I approach it. I think ultimately though if you're looking at it from a fan's perspective, you want to put a product on the field that they're going to enjoy the most.' Cubs manager Joe Maddon joked of having a coach keep track of the mound visit similar to the way an assistant basketball coach tracks timeouts, saying 'maybe there's going to be seven on the scoreboard like the number of timeouts in a game.' 'Our numbers suggest that we were a little over four, something like that,' Oakland manager Bob Melvin said. 'You're just going to have to have an awareness. You're going to have to deal with it. A month or two for now maybe it's a non-issue at some point. There's no sense in fighting it, being combative about it. Just figure out a way to try to make it part of your routine because it's a very routine sport.' Regarding slow-moving free agency, Manfred said MLB is pleased to see more signings in recent days. 'At the end of the day we want players signed, we want the best players playing the game,' he said. 'It's always our goal.' ___ AP Sports Writer Bob Baum contributed to this report. __ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball