ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
42°
Sunny
H 67° L 33°
  • clear-night
    42°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 67° L 33°
  • clear-day
    63°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 67° L 33°
  • clear-night
    53°
    Evening
    Clear. H 67° L 33°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

National Govt & Politics

    When President Donald Trump's U.N. ambassador recently urged the world to sever diplomatic ties with North Korea, she was sketchy on the details: Should all embassies close? How about those providing the U.S. intelligence from the largely inscrutable country? And what of Sweden, which helps with imprisoned Americans?Nikki Haley's recent call to action underscores the challenge for the United States as it tries to advance a nonmilitary strategy for resolving the nuclear standoff with North Korea. Isolating the reclusive, totalitarian state has been a central component of the U.S. plan, even though Washington says it remains open to talks.Like international economic penalties, the Trump administration believes the diplomatic isolation serves two purposes.It's designed to punish North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for developing an atomic arsenal of bombs and intercontinental missiles that potentially could deliver nuclear warheads anywhere in the United States. U.S. officials also contend that freezing out North Korea could drive Kim's government to seek negotiations.'We do know they care a lot about their international reputation,' said Mark Tokola, a former No. 2 at the U.S. Embassy in South Korea.Trump's team has chalked up some successes in narrowing the North's diplomatic reach. Mexico, Peru, Italy, Spain, and Kuwait have expelled North Korean ambassadors from their countries. Haley said Portugal and the United Arab Emirates have suspended diplomatic relations. Others have cut trade and security ties.But North Korea isn't and won't be completely isolated.Last month, China, whose once-close relationship with North Korea has been strained by its adoption of tough U.N. sanctions, sent its highest level envoy to Pyongyang in two years. North Korea also recently welcomed a Russian parliamentary delegation, in a sign of increasing contacts between the former Cold War partners. And the North just hosted the most senior U.N. official to visit in years: Jeffrey Feltman, the undersecretary-general for political affairs.Even before he departed, experts played down expectations that Feltman, formerly a senior American diplomat, could offer a breakthrough as the standoff over the North's nuclear weapons threatens to spiral into war. Feltman carried no message from Washington, State Department spokesman Heather Nauert said.Yet Feltman's visit, which included an audience with Kim's foreign minister, added to questions about how effectively the U.S. can isolate North Korea. Feltman left Pyongyang on Saturday after four days of talks with the North Korean Foreign Ministry. 'I have to brief the secretary-general first,' he said when asked for details of his trip.Also unresolved is whether Trump and his top advisers have a game plan for the second half of a strategy they've called 'maximum pressure and engagement.' If North Korea signals a willingness to negotiate, now that Kim has declared that he has 'realized the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force,' how will the U.S. respond?'This is probably as good a time as any to try to pivot to engagement,' said Suzanne DiMaggio at the New America think tank, who has been involved in several rounds of unofficial talks with North Korean officials. She said the administration has focused almost completely on pressure.Kim's declaration followed North Korea's test last month of its most powerful intercontinental missile yet, which led Haley, at an emergency U.N. Security Council meeting, to speak of a world 'closer to war.' At the same time, she pushed for others to cut trade and diplomatic ties with Pyongyang.U.S. officials say doing so would stop North Korea from abusing diplomatic privileges that allow it to raise revenues or conduct illegal business in support of its nuclear and missile programs. It's also intended to exploit North Korean sensitivity to its international standing.But the U.S. has given mixed messages on what form concretely the isolation should take.Haley called on all governments to sever ties. Other U.S. officials say the emphasis is on getting North Korean diplomats expelled from overseas postings, not on closing foreign embassies in Pyongyang. To date, no embassies have shut down in the North Korean capital as a result of the U.S. campaign.According to research by the Washington-based East-West Center and the National Committee on North Korea, North Korea maintains diplomatic relations with 167 countries. It has embassies in 47 foreign capitals. Twenty-four countries have embassies in Pyongyang, and those include American rivals and friends.'If the U.S. is really serious about depriving North Korea of diplomatic relations, it must start with its own closest ally, Great Britain,' said Artyom Lukin, a North Korea expert at Far Eastern Federal University in Vladivostok, Russia.Since the U.S. has no diplomatic presence of its own in North Korea — the two sides remain technically in a state of war — it relies to some extent on Britain, Germany and other partners to stay abreast of what's happening there. Most critically, it needs Sweden, its protecting power, to assist three currently detained Americans in North Korea, on the rare occasions when Kim's government allows consular access.Any isolation campaign will have only marginal diplomatic and economic effect without the participation of North Korea's most powerful partners, China and Russia. Both support more dialogue with the North, not more diplomatic sanctions.Even if only smaller countries follow America's advice, the U.S. could lose potential go-betweens, such as Vietnam and Mongolia, which have constructive relations with the U.S. and North Korea.'If they left, I would be worried I was losing a source of information and a more neutral voice that the North Koreans might actually listen to,' said Frank Jannuzi, a former Senate staff specialist on Asia.___Online:State Department on North Korea: https://www.state.gov/p/eap/ci/kn/
  • Start the countdown clock on a momentous two weeks for President Donald Trump and the GOP-run Congress.Republicans are determined to deliver the first revamp of the nation's tax code in three decades and prove they can govern after their failure to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law this past summer. Voters who will decide which party holds the majority in next year's midterms elections are watching.Republicans are negotiating with Democrats on the contentious issue of how much the government should spend on the military and domestic agencies to avert a holiday shutdown. An extension of the program that provides low-cost health care to more than 8 million children and aid to hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico, Texas and Florida need to be addressed. And further complicating the end-of-year talks is the fate of some 800,000 young immigrants here illegally.Lawmakers are trying to get it all done by Dec. 22.A look at the crowded agenda:___TAXESRepublicans are upbeat about finalizing a tax bill from the House and Senate versions for Trump's first major legislative accomplishment in nearly 11 months in office.'I feel very confident we're going to get this done ... at the end of the day we're going to get this to the president's desk and he's going to sign it,' House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., said Sunday in an interview on Fox News Channel.The House and Senate bills would cut taxes by about $1.5 trillion over the next decade while adding billions to the $20 trillion deficit. They combine steep tax cuts for corporations with more modest reductions for most individuals.Republican leaders have struggled to placate GOP lawmakers from high-tax states like California, New York and New Jersey whose constituents would be hit hard by the elimination of the prized federal deduction for state and local taxes. Repeal of the deduction added up to $1.3 trillion in revenue over a decade that could be used for deep tax cuts.Lawmakers finally settled on a compromise in both bills — full repeal of the state and local deductions for income and sales taxes, but homeowners would be able to deduct up to $10,000 in local property taxes.And yet it's still not a done deal.'There's a lot of conversation around the fact that in some of the blue states where the taxes are high, the property tax alone, they will not be able to use the $10,000 possible deductions,' Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., said on NBC's 'Meet the Press with Chuck Todd' on Sunday. 'So allowing for income and property taxes, which would cost another $100 billion by the way, to be options for folks in those states would be a better solution. And we're looking at ways to make that happen.'Just a few weeks ago, lawmakers were unyielding on their insistence that the corporate tax rate be slashed from 35 percent to 20 percent. Now, one way to finance the changes on state and local taxes would be to cut the corporate tax rate to 21 or 22 percent instead.___GOVERNMENT SPENDINGRepublicans and Democrats are trying to work out a sweeping budget deal. They got a temporary reprieve from a partial government shutdown when they passed a stopgap, two-week bill last Thursday.Republicans want a major boost in defense spending. Democrats want a similar increase for domestic agencies.Congress also has to figure out how much disaster aid should be directed to Puerto Rico, Texas and Florida. The Trump administration requested $44 billion last month, an amount lawmakers from hurricane-slammed regions say is insufficient. The latest request would bring the total appropriated for disaster relief this fall to close to $100 billion — and the government still must calculate how much it will cost to rebuild Puerto Rico's devastated housing stock and electric grid.___CHILDREN'S HEALTHFresh federal money for the Children's Health Insurance Program, known as CHIP, ran out on Oct. 1, a blow to the widely popular program that provides low-cost medical care to more than 8 million children. Some states have relied on unspent funds, while others that were running out of money got a short-term reprieve in the two-week spending bill.Lawmakers hope to agree on a long-term budget solution for a program that's about $14 billion a year.___IMMIGRATIONDemocrats want to act now to protect young immigrants who came to the United States illegally as children, with demands that a solution is included in any year-end spending deal.'We will not leave here without a DACA fix,' said Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., referring to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.These young immigrants, often referred to as Dreamers, face deportation in a few months after Trump reversed administrative protections established by President Barack Obama.Republicans say it can wait till next year and shouldn't bog down the broad budget agreement. However, House GOP leaders likely will require Democratic votes for the spending bill and they have to work out a deal with Pelosi.___Associated Press writers Marcy Gordon and Andrew Taylor contributed to this report.
  • Alabama Democrats see Tuesday's special Senate election as a chance to renounce a history littered with politicians whose race-baiting, bombast and other baggage have long soiled the state's reputation beyond its borders.Many Republicans see the vote as chance to ratify their conservative values and protect President Donald Trump's agenda ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.At the center are Republican Roy Moore, a former jurist twice removed as state chief justice and now accused of sexual misconduct with teenage girls decades ago, and Democrat Doug Jones, an erstwhile federal prosecutor best known for prosecuting two Ku Klux Klansmen responsible for killing four black girls in the 1963 bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church.The winner will take the seat held previously by Trump's attorney general, Jeff Sessions. Republicans control the Senate with 52 seats.In truth, the matchup mixes both Alabama's tortured history and the nation's current divisive, bitterly partisan politics, and it has made a spectacle of a Deep South state well acquainted with national scrutiny but not accustomed to competitive general elections.'This is an election to tell the whole world what we stand for,' Jones told supporters at one stop Sunday, adding that his campaign 'is on the right side of history.' At an earlier appearance, he declared Alabama is 'at a crossroads' and that Moore, an unapologetic evangelical populist, tries only to 'create conflict and division.'Jones, 63, stops short of explicitly comparing Moore to the four-term Gov. George Wallace, whose populism was rooted in segregation. But Jones alluded Sunday to that era of Alabama politics.'Elect a responsible man to a responsible office,' Jones said, repeating the campaign slogan of another Alabama governor, Albert Brewer, who nearly defeated Wallace in 1970 in a contest Alabama liberals and many moderates still lament as a lost opportunity.Some of Jones' supporters put it even more bluntly. 'I thought Alabama's image was pretty much at the bottom,' said Pat Lawrence, a retired software engineer in Huntsville. A Moore win, Lawrence added, 'will be a whole new bottom.'Those concerns extend even to some GOP quarters. Alabama's senior senator, Richard Shelby, confirmed Sunday that he did not vote for Moore, saying he wrote in another 'distinguished' party figure he declined to name.Yet for many Republicans, Moore is a paragon of traditional values. They reject accusations that he molested two teenage girls and pursued relationships with others decades ago. Moore denies the charges.'Everyone has to vote their convictions,' said Kevin Mims of Montgomery, as he held his Bible outside his Baptist church Sunday in Montgomery. 'My conviction is he's the right man for the job.'Where Moore's critics see a state judge who defied federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court's decision legalizing same-sex marriage, Mims see a stalwart who stands 'on the word of God.' Other conservatives see an anti-establishment firebrand in the mold of Trump, who won Alabama by 28 percentage points.Moore encourages that view with fundraising emails that urge backers to help him 'defeat the elite,' a swipe at both Democrats and the establishment Republicans who tried to deny him the GOP nomination earlier this year.Ultimately, Republicans from Moore to Trump himself are betting on a simple bottom line: Most Alabama conservatives simply won't defect to a Democrat.'If Alabama elects liberal Democrat Doug Jones, all of our progress will be stopped cold,' Trump says in a robocall the Moore campaign plans to push out Monday.The president also invokes a common fear among Republicans, calling Jones 'a puppet of Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer,' the Democratic House and Senate leaders in Washington, both of them reviled by conservative voters. 'Roy Moore is the guy we need to pass our Make American Great Again agenda,' the president insists.Moore's baggage could make it difficult to draw conclusions about what the results might mean beyond Alabama, but both parties are watching closely.Democrats need to flip 24 GOP-held seats to reclaim a House majority, and they're trying to dent the slim Republican advantage in the Senate and its dominance of statehouses around the country. In many of those races, they'll need the same thing Jones must get to win in Alabama: strong turnout among young and non-white voters, along with improved performance among suburban moderates.A Jones victory would be hailed as a potential precursor, and Democrats have indicated they have a post-Alabama strategy even if Jones loses: They'll take Alabama's brand national, hammering Republicans as 'the party of Donald Trump and Roy Moore.'-----Barrow reported from Mobile, Alabama. Follow Barrow on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BillBarrowAP and Chandler at https://twitter.com/StatehouseKim.
  • With two weeks until Christmas, the to-do list is a long one for the Congress, as GOP lawmakers try to finish work on a sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code, fund the government into 2018, and look to deal with a number of other contentious issues that have eluded lawmakers and the White House, but it’s not clear how much the House and Senate will be able to accomplish before going home for the holidays “If things don’t get done, we are going to have quite a catastrophe,” said Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), one of many GOP lawmakers who remain confident that Republican leaders will find a way to reach a deal on tax reform. “I think this is one that we’re going to get done,” said Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). “There’s unanimity in the conference to get this done.” Here is what lies ahead for lawmakers in the Congress: 1. GOP must move quickly to finish tax reform bill. If Republicans are going to get a tax reform bill on the President’s desk before Christmas, they don’t have much time. Lawmakers certainly don’t want to be on Capitol Hill after Friday the 22nd; the first formal meeting of the House-Senate tax reform “conference” committee is on Wednesday, but that’s really more for show. Behind the scenes, key GOP lawmakers have already been trying to reach agreements on final language in the bill. If you want a full rundown on the differences between the House and Senate versions, read this comparison from the Joint Committee on Taxation. There have already been a number of stories about mistakes and loopholes in the GOP tax reform plan – we’ll see if those get resolved as well. This is no slam dunk, but the odds still favor the GOP. Tight squeeze. Conference draft by 11th. Many hairy issues. Must finish by 18th to do budget due on 22nd. Stephen Cooper and Dylan Moroses: 'Brady Says International Tax Changes May Need Transition' https://t.co/LutCCAUq2V — Martin Sullivan (@M_SullivanTax) December 8, 2017 2. Next stop gap budget runs out on December 22. There isn’t enough time to write a full “Omnibus” spending bill (Speaker Ryan said that last week), so the question is more likely how much will Congress get done on funding the operations of the federal government, and how much gets booted into 2018. Republicans have been making noise about approving a funding bill for the military, keeping all other agencies on a temporary budget, and then adding in a bunch of year-end sweeteners to the bill. It’s also possible that such a deal could increase the ‘budget caps,’ allowing for a larger defense budget, and maybe more domestic spending as well. The idea of increasing spending just before the holidays does not sit well with more conservative Republicans. And what about DACA and the immigrant Dreamers? There could be a lot of wheeling and dealing in the days ahead. Would Freedom Caucus support a CR compromise that includes CHIP, health CSR, or defense/non=BCA cap breaking? If not, Dems may be able to demand DACA in CR without getting full blame for shutdown or threat — Matt Grossmann (@MattGrossmann) December 10, 2017 3. Will there be more shoes dropping on Capitol Hill? After what was a historic week – where three members announced their resignations due to allegations of sexual misconduct – it’s not unreasonable to wonder if more stories will surface in coming days. There’s already pressure on Rep. Ruben Kihuen (D-NV) and Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-TX) to resign – an ethics probe was announced last Friday on Farenthold, who says he will pay back an $84,000 sexual harassment settlement with a former staffer. Over the weekend, reports surfaced about another possible taxpayer payout related to a harassment lawsuit, involving Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL). As a reporter, I cannot stress how unusual last week was on Capitol Hill. If you have one lawmaker announce a resignation, that’s a big deal. Two resignations was a major headline. And then a surprise third. One cannot discount the possibilities that more such stories are in the pipeline. Stay tuned. Taxpayers paid $220,000 to settle a sexual harassment suit involving Florida Democratic Rep. Alcee Hastings… https://t.co/j5dQct1nea — George Bennett (@gbennettpost) December 9, 2017 4. From member of Congress to anti-filibuster PAC? Last Thursday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) stunned his colleagues by announcing his resignation, effective January 31. But on Friday, he decided to make it effective immediately, citing the hospitalization of his wife, after revelations that he had tried to get female staffers in his office to be a surrogate for his child (not a campaign surrogate). In between those events, a Minnesota television news crew that was in Washington to cover the resignation of Sen. Al Franken (D-MN), stumbled into Franks at their hotel, as they overheard the Arizona Republican on the phone soliciting big money donations to start a political action committee that would fight to get rid of the filibuster in the Senate, which Franks, and other more conservative Republicans in the House have been blaming for inaction on the GOP agenda. The news crew that stumbled into that story must still be shaking their heads about their luck. Amazing: Minnesota news crew in DC for Franken overhears Trent Franks soliciting $2 million to start an anti-filibuster PAC https://t.co/TkAzUXx6Yz — Matt DeLong (@mattdelong) December 9, 2017 5. Roy Moore and the Alabama U.S. Senate race. Tuesday is finally Election Day in the Yellowhammer State, and no matter what else is happening in the halls of Congress this week, the outcome of this race will be a big deal. If Moore wins, a lot of GOP Senators won’t like the outcome. If Democrat Doug Jones wins, that will be a setback for President Donald Trump, who tried to stir support for Moore during a Fright night rally in Pensacola, Florida. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell telegraphed last week that if Roy Moore wins, then the new Alabama Senator is certain to face a review by the Senate Ethics Committee. Alabama’s senior Senator, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), made it clear again on Sunday that he wrote in someone else – instead of voting for Roy Moore. Just that part of the story is highly unusual, let alone all the other news stories that keep coming out about Moore’s past actions and beliefs. It would be an unprecedented situation if Moore wins, since so many GOP Senators have made it crystal clear that they want no part of him.
  • Rappelling into a bull-riding rodeo event , crawling through dirt in a SWAT obstacle course and entering a burning building with firefighters.These could be action movie stunts by Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Hollywood star turned California governor.But they were all done by another governor earning a reputation for public displays of physical prowess — Eric Greitens of Missouri.The 43-year-old Greitens — the nation's second-youngest state executive — revels in the attention, posting videos of his action adventures on Facebook and even using them to help stay fit while keeping a demanding schedule.In one feat of strength, Greitens visited an indoor rock climbing business and easily scaled two walls as media cameras rolled. Greitens was at the veteran-owned business to announce an initiative to eliminate all start-up business fees for veterans in Missouri. Other exploits include leading runs with military members , climbing 110 flights of stairs in memory of 9/11, and riding in a Missouri Highway Patrol car through a high-speed obstacle course'Look, this is fun. It's a good time,' Greitens said after scaling the climbing wall. 'And I think it's important that people know we are fighting every day for the people of Missouri.'A novice to politics, Greitens has experience in real fights. He was a boxer in college and has a black belt in Taekwondo. A former Navy SEAL officer, he was once chlorine-gassed in a suicide bomb attack in Iraq. He returned to service three days later.Greitens was elected in 2016 with no prior experience in public office. He typically wakes up between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m. to run on local trails or do strength training at the Missouri State Highway Patrol gym, spokesman Parker Briden said. Shooting the photos and videos of the governor does not require a fulltime staffer and there is no cost to the state of Missouri, Briden said.He's not the first elected official to earn a reputation for fitness. House Speaker Paul Ryan is a fan of high-intensity P90X workouts. And seven-time Mr. Olympia — Schwarzenegger —went every year to a bodybuilding competition. He called lawmakers 'girlie men' when they didn't go along with him.But Missouri State University communications expert Elizabeth Dudash-Buskirk said Greitens' use of social media to highlight his physical exploits is 'unprecedented.'He wants to be that picture that you think of when you think of a strong government, when you think of a strong military (and) when you think of a strong police force,' she said.Dudash-Buskirk said Greitens' self-branding as a veteran might also signal higher political aspirations from a governor who has long been pegged as highly ambitious. The Republican reserved the web address ericgreitensforpresident.com years ago.The governor has gotten generally good reviews on Facebook for the stunts. In response to a video of Greitens rappelling into the bull-riding event, one user commented that 'Missouri now officially has the coolest governor.'Springfield resident Conor Bruner, who voted for Greitens, said the videos show Greitens 'being a man.'They're all pencil pushers,' said Bruner, referring to other elected officials. 'He sort of changed the game.'There are skeptics, too. Sharon Swon of Mexico, Missouri, asked why Greitens keeps trying to prove how 'macho' he is.'So he can do pushups,' Swon said. 'I'm not impressed.'----Ballentine reported from Jefferson City, and Stafford reported from Kansas City. Associated Press writer Juliet Williams also contributed to this report from San Francisco.
  • Simeon Booker, a trail-blazing journalist and the first full-time African-American reporter at The Washington Post, has died at the age of 99.Booker died Sunday in Solomons, Maryland, according to a Post obituary, citing his wife Carol.Booker served for decades as the Washington bureau chief for the African-American publications Jet weekly and Ebony monthly. He is credited with bringing to national prominence the death of Emmett Till, the 14-year old African-American boy whose brutal murder in Mississippi became a galvanizing point for the nascent civil rights movement.Booker was born in Baltimore and raised in Youngstown, Ohio. He joined the Post in 1952, but moved on two years later to found the Washington bureau for Jet and Ebony.In 2016, he received a career George Polk Award in journalism.
  • As Alabama's high-profile Senate race heads toward a Tuesday vote, supporters and opponents of GOP candidate Roy Moore are bending the truth — or shattering it to pieces — in the campaign's final stretch.One website falsely proclaimed that one of the women who accused Moore of sexual misconduct had recanted. Another erroneously reported that a Moore accuser 'forged' his yearbook inscription to her. On the other side, Moore's detractors took to social media to assert, erroneously, that Moore had written in a 2011 textbook that women shouldn't hold elected office.The Associated Press checked these out; here are the real facts:NOT REAL: BREAKING: Roy Moore's Lying Accuser Admits He Didn't Ever Touch HerTHE FACTS: None of the women who accused the Alabama Republican Senate candidate of sexual misconduct, including two women who said Moore molested them, have backed off their initial claims. This fake headline is from a website, Reagan Was Right, which promotes hoaxes and satire. The woman featured in a photograph accompanying the story shows a British reality TV star, not any of the eight women who have accused Moore of sexual misconduct.NOT REAL: Claims that Roy Moore authored a textbook in 2011 that says women shouldn't run for officeTHE FACTS: Moore is in fact a co-author of a 'textbook' which serves as a study guide for a series of Bible-based video and audio lectures on U.S. law and public policy. The course packaging also identifies him as a 'featured speaker.' Despite claims spread on the web this week, however, Moore did not author the specific section or deliver the lecture that argues that women should not hold elected office. That talk was given by William Einwechter, an elder at Immanuel Free Reformed Church in Pennsylvania. Moore's office says he does not believe that women are unqualified for public office.NOT REAL: BREAKING: ROY MOORE ACCUSER ADMITS SHE FORGED PART OF YEARBOOK INSCRIPTION!!!THE FACTS: Moore supporters celebrated misleading news that Beverly Nelson, one of his accusers, 'forged' a 1977 yearbook inscription that was considered key evidence against the Alabama Republican. The inscription reads, 'To a sweeter more beautiful girl I could not say, 'Merry Christmas.'' It is followed by the signature 'Roy Moore D.A.' and the notation '12-22-77 Olde Hickory House.' Nelson's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Friday that Nelson had added the date and restaurant name to the inscription. However, Allred also said that a handwriting expert found Moore's signature in the yearbook to be authentic.___Associated Press writer Michael Rubinkam contributed to this report.___This is part of The Associated Press' ongoing effort to fact-check misinformation that is shared widely online, including work with Facebook to identify and reduce the circulation of false stories on the platform.___Find all AP Fact Checks here: https://www.apnews.com/tag/APFactCheck
  • President Donald Trump is again railing against the news media, calling them a 'stain on America.'In a tweet Sunday, Trump blasts the lack of attention over what he describes as 'false and defamatory stories' by the 'Fake News Media.'They are out of control - correct reporting means nothing to them. Major lies written, then forced to be withdrawn after they are exposed...a stain on America!' Trump writes.Over the past two weeks, ABC News and CNN have had to issue corrections and clarifications on stories that initially had been damaging to the president but didn't live up to scrutiny. And on Saturday, Trump demanded and received an apology from a Washington Post reporter over a photo of Trump's Florida rally on Friday that made it look sparsely attended.
  • The Latest on the race for the Alabama Senate seat (all times local):7:10 p.m.Alabama voters are getting a recorded phone call in which President Donald Trump says he needs Republican Roy Moore in the U.S. Senate.The 90-second audio recording released Sunday by the Moore campaign includes Trump saying progress on his agenda will be 'stopped cold' if Alabama elects Democrat Doug Jones.State voters will begin receiving the call on Monday, the day before the election.Trump calls Moore a conservative who will help get the nation back on track after what he refers to as the 'Obama disaster.' The president says Republicans need Moore's vote in the Senate, where the GOP has a majority with 52 votes.Trump calls Jones a liberal who's a puppet of Democratic congressional leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer.___6:20 p.m.Alabama Democratic Senate nominee Doug Jones is using the words of the state's senior GOP senator in his last-minute push for votes.In a Sunday night speech at a Huntsville church, Jones repeated Sen. Richard Shelby's remark on a morning talk show that Alabama can 'do better' than electing Republican Roy Moore in Tuesday's race for US Senate.Shelby says he did not vote for Moore, but instead wrote in the name of another Republican.Jones's campaign has been emphasizing Shelby's statement through the day.Moore did not hold any public campaign events on Sunday. He has scheduled a Monday night rally with former Trump strategist Steve Bannon.___5:10 p.m.Democratic Senate candidate Doug Jones says Tuesday's election against Republican Roy Moore will send a message far beyond Alabama's borders.Jones told campaign workers during an appearance in Birmingham on Sunday that the vote will tell the world what Alabama stands for. Jones says his campaign 'is on the right side of history.'Jones was joined for a second day by New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, one of just two African American Democrats serving in the Senate. Jones' campaign is painfully aware of their need to drive extraordinary levels of black voters and moderate Republicans to the polls.Alabama doesn't have any Democrats in statewide office. Jones' campaign has been buoyed by allegations that Moore made improper sexual advances toward teen girls decades ago.___11:30 a.m.Roy Moore's chief strategist is tying the Republican Senate candidate to President Donald Trump's star in Alabama.Dean Young said Sunday on ABC's 'This Week' that the special election is 'ground zero' for Trump and that Alabamians who want the president's agenda to be achieved should vote for Moore.He says: 'This is Donald Trump on trial in Alabama.'Trump has urged voters to back Moore over Democrat Doug Jones in Tuesday's election.Moore's candidacy has been rocked by allegations of sexual misconduct by multiple women.Young says the women aren't credible. In contrast, a number of senior Republicans in Congress say they believe the women. Trump, however, has raised doubts about the accusers and has criticized Jones as the 'liberal puppet' of Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi.
  • Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been a rare sight on the traditional campaign trail in the days ahead of a critical U.S. Senate race. He's appeared at only a handful of rallies in front of friendly audiences and steadfastly has shunned reporters from the mainstream media.Moore's past campaigns have never been heavy on the conventional, but his relative absence from the spotlight this time around is nearly unheard of for a major party candidate.Moore has focused on meeting with small groups of supporters and an aggressive social media campaign out of camera range as he tries to win Tuesday's election against Democrat Doug Jones - a contest that was supposed to be an easy GOP victory - until November, when a number of women stepped forward to accuse Moore of engaging in sexual misconduct when he was in his 30s and they were teenagers.Moore has denied the allegations and refuses to back down.Moore's stealth effort has left Jones resorting to mockery as the Democrat crisscrosses the state trying to pull an upset in Tuesday's special election, buoyed by the possibility that enough Republicans will abandon the 70-year-old Moore in the wake of the allegations.'Roy Moore is in hiding. He's kind of like the groundhog. He comes out every so often to see if he can see his shadow,' Jones said Saturday in Selma during one of several stops for the Democrat this weekend.Ben DuPre, a campaign spokesman, said Moore is not holding back.'He's talking to voters. We are getting the message out any way that we can. I know you are the old media and you get offended when we don't talk to you, but we've got Twitter. We've got Facebook. He's doing interviews. He's doing radio.'Moore campaign chairman Bill Armistead said Moore has spent the week doing smaller unannounced events with supporters and has been on the phone with pastors and others urging supporters to get to the polls on Tuesday. He said the campaign feels confident going into Tuesday.Moore's campaign is actively pushing his narrative on social media and in press releases. He's also drawing headlines with the help of President Donald Trump, who came to the Florida Panhandle on Friday night and has lined up a recorded telephone call from the president that will start being delivered to Alabama voters on Monday.Moore has never been conventional. He has built a large following among some evangelical voters from two failed gambits: upholding a display of the Ten Commandments in a state building and trying to block same-sex marriage in Alabama. He was tossed from office in both instances.Moore plans to close out his campaign Monday night with another large rally featuring former Trump campaign guru Steve Bannon.Alabama campaign consultant David Mowery - whose client Democrat Bob Vance lost to Moore in the 2012 Alabama Supreme Court chief justice race - said Moore has never been a candidate to do many public events but shunning just about all traditional media during the Senate race is 'pretty unprecedented.'Still, Mowery said, Moore knows how to focus on his base.'We never knew where he was and then we'd get a picture from somebody showing us some church marquee saying, 'Judge Moore is here on Saturday,'' he recalled. 'He's out there, he's just with his base, and usually in small events.'Mowery said the temptation is to obsess too much over what Moore is doing.'You lose the forest for the trees worrying over the opponent,' Mowery said. 'It wasn't like we were competing over the same voters anyway.'We were going after the Chamber of Commerce, country club, First Methodist kind of Republicans ... not the fundamentalists and the snake handlers. We were never going to get them anyway, and neither is Doug,' he said.Bill Stewart, the former chairman of the political science department at the University of Alabama, said Moore appears to be banking on his evangelical base, as well as the state's overwhelming tendency to vote Republican, to carry him to victory on Tuesday.Republicans in Alabama tend to clear 60 percent of the vote — though Moore has struggled in his previous races to reach that number — and voters here haven't elected a Democrat to the Senate since 1992.Stewart said he can't remember a candidate ever virtually 'disappearing from public view' the way Moore has. Still, he said Moore has little to gain but 'a lot to lose' by making a mistake.'There may be a method in his madness,' Stewart said.